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Wrote a book, Now what??

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Bilbo Bagins, Sep 18, 2012.

  1. Bilbo Bagins

    Bilbo Bagins Slacked jawed

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    So a good friend of mine, out of the clear blue asked me for a favor. He asked me to read something and tell him what I think. Little did I know my goofball of a friend was a closet Sci-Fi novelist and he handed me memory stick with a 400 page novel in it.

    The crazy thing is...its freakin good. After I read it the first thing I told him was he needs to get it published. Unfortunately he is way too shy and sheepish. His wife also agrees that he needs to talk to a publisher, but his response to the both of us is...I don't know how :dunno:

    Any GT writers out there can explain, in plain English, the process of how a first time writer can get a book published.
     
  2. Atlas

    Atlas transmogrifier

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    All I can contribute is that the percentage of novelists (any genre) who are published is microscopic..

    You/he may want to Google-search "self-publish".


    By the way, the real money is in.... romance novels.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2012

  3. Peace Warrior

    Peace Warrior Am Yisrael Chai CLM

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    As a newbie, he can speak to xulon press. It is a pay to publish/print type service, but for less than $500 he gets a publisher and all the toys and whistles that goes along with a professional's book deal.

    If it sells, someone will probably be knocking on his door, holding a check, trying to get him to sign a deal for another book.

    Also, with today's digital media allowing writers to print books as they sell them, he can also go that route and after the initial set up fees, he can simply pay for what he wants printed out each time. (IOW, he won't have boxes of books collecting dust in the garage as he tries to market them.)

    I know a writer in Georgia who both her and her mom write and publish their own stuff. They aren't million sellers or on NY best seller list, but they do okay as far as supplementing their income.
     
  4. JimP

    JimP

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    you need to find a publisher that deals with that genre'. Send them a copy to see if they will pick it up for publishing. They will want to edit the dogsnot out of it so ensure you retain final approval. Good luck.

    Or - self-publish like previous poster suggested. much easier but marketing can be difficult.
     
  5. Peace Warrior

    Peace Warrior Am Yisrael Chai CLM

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    I write quite a bit, but I'm not ready to take the plunge as far as owning up to what I'm writing. If he ever wants a ghost writer to help with making a deadline, tell him to send me a PM here. :supergrin:
     
  6. Flying-Dutchman

    Flying-Dutchman

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    Try Amazon’s Kindle

    Publishers are no longer the gate keeper.
     
  7. bwphoto

    bwphoto Lifetime Member

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    1- Who are the authors he wants to emulate?
    2- Find out who their agents are
    3- Contact those agents and see if they're interested
    4- Blog about it, put snippets online, start doing your own promotion

    I write a lot and have researched this topic. My reason for doing so was not related to a novel, but for novels this is generally the advice I find. E-books aren't a bad way to go, but you'll have to have him promote the hell out of it in absence of a "real" publisher. And it doesn't sound like promotion is his strong suit.

    Also google around on other websites. GT knows a lot about Glocks, but there are better resources out there. As always, be wary of anyone offering to read it if you pay them up front (other than an editor, which it also probably needs)

    Good luck!
     
  8. Gallium

    Gallium CLM

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    What of copyright? Has it been established?
     
  9. coqui33

    coqui33 NRA Instructor

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  10. jtmac

    jtmac Señor Member

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    He needs to get an agent.

    Agent agent agent agent agent.

    If he has the social or technical ability (not to mention the gumption) to break into online communities and make a go with e-books and print-on-demand self-publishing (Amazon and several others have nice systems for this), he can have a go at it. That's what I'm doing with my novel, but I don't have to spend money for website design and the other technical needs and I know where to break in to try to get some free publicity.

    If he has any interest in traditional publishing and getting into bookstores, he needs to find an agent. There's a process to doing so, but it's well described on many websites.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2012
  11. Batesmotel

    Batesmotel

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    Remind him to swallow his ego when it comes time to have someone edit it.

    My wife has a friend with at least three books that should have published. She would have made good money. But they are in need of editing for continuity, grammar and style. Nothing major just tweaks and corrections and the grammar is rather regional. She E-published them and has done OK but could have made much more and now paper publishers won't touch her because her name is tied to the flawed E-books.
     
  12. bobby_w

    bobby_w Alienigena Platinum Member

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    Kim Komando (America's Digital Goddess) has a pretty good article on Self Publishing.

    Sell your book online
     
  13. Peace Warrior

    Peace Warrior Am Yisrael Chai CLM

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    Hmmmmmmmmmm......... interesting. thanks. :wavey:
     
  14. RonS

    RonS Millennium Member

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  15. K720

    K720

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    I wrote a book as well and had it professionally edited by an established editor. I'm in the process of trying to find an agent, and I've had a lot of rejections thus far. I'll keep submitting it and hopefully, someone will decide to take a chance on it. Tell your friend that writing the book was the easy part!
     
  16. tslex

    tslex

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    Traditional publishing is getting narrower and narrower, with fewer fiction authors published each year, but sci fi is actually a genre that is a bit easier to break into thrillers or mysteries.

    Your buddy needs to find a good list of literary agents (here's one http://www.writers.net/agents.html ), find those who handle his sort of book, and then send out at least a couple score of submissions. The KEY is to follow each agent's submission guidelines to the letter. I mean exactly. Some want 10 pages by email in the email body, some want two chapters in a PDF, some want every other word inscribed in blood on a camel's back. Whatever each one wants, send them THAT exactly and nothing more or less. Any variance at all and the query is likely not be opened, let alone considered.

    Each submission needs a query letter and the query letter is an art in itself. Here's some advice: http://www.agentquery.com/writer_hq.aspx

    Then . . .wait . . . and persist.

    I queried 56 agents when I finished my novel. About 40 sent form letters or ignored me. About a dozen asked for more, including the whole manuscript and the response from most of those was the same: We like it, you can write, nifty story but it "doesn't fit our list." (Meaning usually it's a bit too cross-genre to be easily published, or that they have other projects they like more, or both.) Four agents liked well enough the book not only to read it all but to correspond in some detail, or ask for changes, or have suggestions, but in the end none of them wanted to rep it.

    i let it sit a few months, then I decided to go wtih Kindle Direct Publishing. I'm not going to explain that process because it really could not be easier -- follow the instructions and it's more straight forward than preparing a PowerPoint. https://kdp.amazon.com/self-publishing/signin

    There are tons of other direct publishing sites and the model has changed now to where I don't think "self-publishing" carries the stigma it used to. At least I hope not.

    See my sig line for the book.