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Discussion Starter #1
I used to carry a Glock 26 and Glock 19, but I sold them a while back to try other things and started carrying a Sig Sauer P229 Enhanced Elite in .357 SIG & 9mm. I also have a S&W M&P Bodyguard 380 for deep concealment. I'm thinking I want another in between option, so I am considering either getting another Glock 26 or a Steyr S9-A1. The Steyr is pretty amazing, but I'm not sure it's small enough to be the middle option. It almost seems closer to a G19 than a subcompact. It's also strangely limited to 10 rounds. What do others think?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I think I will never replace my G26 with a Steyr S9-A1.

The only gun that "might" replace my G26 is a SIG P365 and even if I get the SIG, it will be a long time before the G26 gets sold, maybe never.
I thought about the P365, but even though I am a huge SIG fan, I don't trust their striker-fired guns, and I didn't appreciate the way they handled the P320 fiasco. At the end of the day, I believe striker-fired pistols need a trigger safety.
 
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I thought about the P365, but even though I am a huge SIG fan, I don't trust their striker-fired guns, and I didn't appreciate the way they handled the P320 fiasco. At the end of the day, I believe striker-fired pistols need a trigger safety.
Why do you feel striker fired guns need a trigger safety?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Why do you feel striker fired guns need a trigger safety?
To avoid what we saw last year with the SIG P320. I can't think of a single striker-fired handgun manufacturer other than SIG that doesn't use one.
 

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To be more specific, the P320 incident proved Sig was wrong about their design when they forwent the trigger safety. It's not enough to rely on the sear engagement and a firing pin safety (neither prevented that officer from getting shot in the leg when his holstered SIG P320 fell on the floor). That's why the Glock, S&W, Walther, SA, HK, Taurus, etc... all use them on striker-fired handguns.
 

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To avoid what we saw last year with the SIG P320. I can't think of a single striker-fired handgun manufacturer other than SIG that doesn't use one.
My Kahr's don't have a trigger safety. Frankly I have never understood how the trigger safety actually increased safety. Glocks have had their fair share of ND's from the trigger getting actuated by inadvertent snags of the trigger. I have never actually heard of the trigger safety actually preventing an unwanted discharge.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
My Kahr's don't have a trigger safety. Frankly I have never understood how the trigger safety actually increased safety. Glocks have had their fair share of ND's from the trigger getting actuated by inadvertent snags of the trigger. I have never actually heard of the trigger safety actually preventing an unwanted discharge.
Kahrs are not striker fired pistols. They are DAO.
 

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Moreover, the design flaw in SIG's P320 results in accidental discharges and not just negligent ones. There's a difference. When has a Glock ever fired because it fell on the floor? They have dropped them from planes and helicopters and I've never heard of a Glock going off. If something makes its way into the trigger guard, that's different, but that's not what happened with the SIG P320.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
To answer your question, think of the trigger safety as a drop safety. That's really what it's there for. In other words, inertia itself isn't going to allow the trigger bar to move rearward to move the sear and release the striker. When you don't have one, however, then the pistol, when hit hard enough, can go off as we saw with the SIG P320.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
A striker-fired action is considered to be a subcategory of DAO, but hey are different. DAO actions generally have a longer heavier trigger pull to mitigate the possibility of a ND or AD.
 

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Hell yeah I would! In a hot second. Steyr pistols are better designed and have a better trigger out of the box. Hell, you even get better sights out of the box.


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Discussion Starter #14
My SIG P250, for example, had a striker, but it's a DAO. It is not striker fired.
 

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My SIG P250, for example, had a striker, but it's a DAO. It is not striker fired.
Actually, I don't know if you'd consider it a striker. I'd probably just call it a firing pin.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
DAO can basically have a hammer or be hammerless, but it's generally going to have a longer and heavier pull. That's the difference. Perhaps SIG thought, "Hey, Kahr has a good safety record, maybe we can tease out that idea in a striker-fired gun." Obviously that proved to be a bad idea last year, and the voluntary upgrade should have been a mandatory one, and it should have been a new trigger with a new trigger safety rather than a physically lighter trigger that is supposed to resist inertia better than the heavier one it replaced.
 

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Moreover, the design flaw in SIG's P320 results in accidental discharges and not just negligent ones. There's a difference. When has a Glock ever fired because it fell on the floor? They have dropped them from planes and helicopters and I've never heard of a Glock going off. If something makes its way into the trigger guard, that's different, but that's not what happened with the SIG P320.
We don't seem to agree on anything. There is absolutely no distinction between accidental and negligent discharge to me. Frankly, to me there is no such thing as an accidental discharge.

As far as drop safe, the design of the gun is either drop safe or it isn't, the doggle on the trigger is just one possible element. Clearly one that means a lot to you, obviously not something I think much about at all.

The Glock trigger safety in all practical senses has zero effect on drop safeness. There isn't enough mass in that stubby plastic trigger to actuate the trigger regardless of how the gun landed, with or without that safety block.

After all the fiasco surrounding the P320, do you really think SIG would ship the P365 if it wasn't drop safe?
 

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To be more specific, the P320 incident proved Sig was wrong about their design when they forwent the trigger safety. It's not enough to rely on the sear engagement and a firing pin safety (neither prevented that officer from getting shot in the leg when his holstered SIG P320 fell on the floor). That's why the Glock, S&W, Walther, SA, HK, Taurus, etc... all use them on striker-fired handguns.
The gun was fine before and is fine after. There are probably more people that have shot themselves cleaning a Glock or shot themselves in the D reholstering than have fired and shooting a P320 by dropping it. Both guns will fire if attention isn’t paid when handing them.

And Sig handled the whole thing pretty well, IMO.


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Discussion Starter #19
Plus, when you look at the best striker fired triggers in the market (the Walther PPQ, the Steyr M, S, C, and L pistols, the CZ P-10c etc...) they all manage to have a better trigger than the P320 and they all have a trigger safety. The truth is, SIG Sauer is not the company that brought the P226 to the market. They are essentially an American company operating with nearly complete autonomy, and I don't trust their newer designs. Even though the American subsidiary produced the P229, it is obviously a modified P226. Their 1911s are obviously not theirs either. The SIG P320, however, is their brain child and I just don't think their engineers are the same caliber of a John Browning or a Gaston Glock (or even other great engineers at Walther, S&W, Steyr etc.). That's just my opinion, but I wouldn't buy one of their striker-fired guns.
 

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I used to carry a Glock 26 and Glock 19, but I sold them a while back to try other things and started carrying a Sig Sauer P229 Enhanced Elite in .357 SIG & 9mm. I also have a S&W M&P Bodyguard 380 for deep concealment. I'm thinking I want another in between option, so I am considering either getting another Glock 26 or a Steyr S9-A1. The Steyr is pretty amazing, but I'm not sure it's small enough to be the middle option. It almost seems closer to a G19 than a subcompact. It's also strangely limited to 10 rounds. What do others think?
I agree that it's actually closer in size to a G19 than it is a G26. and My only objection to a G26 is that while if has a shorter grip and slide, it's just a s thick as a G19 and both feel to me like carrying a block of wood in an IWB holster and I prefer a single stack for IWB carry. According to the specs the Steyr S9-A1 is even a little thicker and it's heavier than the G26.

That said, it has nice ergonomics and I would probably carry better than your Sig P229 but if you want something in-between the Sig and the 380 you might want to try a S&W Shield which is available with a factory 8 round mag.

I'ds have to actually handle a Steyr S9-A1 before I could decide between it an a G26 but if you've carried a G26 in the past and were comfortable with it I think it seems a little more concealable than the Steyr. And the advantage to the Glock is the cost and availability of spare mags both 10 round and 15.

But I do like the looks of the Steyr but I think I'd be more interested in the 40 caliber version which is the same size but holds the same number of rounds (10+1).
 
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