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I thought I absolutely would never consider buying one; until today...

My AZ house has a couple of offers in on it so I thought I might want to start house hunting in the area.

Found a great little town 10 miles from work, 13 miles from family, and close to 2 other larger towns in case my new job doesn't pan out.

It has about half a dozen homes for sale in my price range which my dad and I checked out.

One of them was a manufactured home that was on a foundation.

I had no idea it was a MH until my dad pointed it out. It has a great wrap around porch, normal pitched roof, 2x6 construction, and is basically a brand new home.

An old guy had a great lot developed for it in 2009, lived in it for a year before he died, and it has been vacant for nearly 3 years.

One of the neighbors is a retired older guy who keeps the lawn mowed and shows the house. He and my dad talked at length and discovered they knew a lot of the same people.

He told us that the children of the old guy live in Seattle and haven't budged on the asking price.

He also informed us who did the foundation work, how the other neighbors are, and all the other little details you don't often find out until you buy a place.

The size is perfect, the location is perfect, I love the floor plan, and the price is within budget.

My dad said the brand of home is the best in the industry and is as close as you can get to stick-built for a MH.

The stick-built homes in the area in my price range are all very old, about the same size, and need remodeling.

It's very tempting, but the depreciation is what has me concerned, as well as the apparently idiotic kids who won't budge on the price...
 

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I looked into them hard before I finally bought the house I have now.


I'd certainly live in one if it was what I was looking for.
 

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It's very tempting, but the depreciation is what has me concerned, as well as the apparently idiotic kids who won't budge on the price...
Why are they idiotic? Because they want X amount of dollars for something and you think that is too much?
 

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As for a mfg'd home.

I think some of the construction can be quite good. There is nothing particularly better in construction with a stick home. What I think you will see the big differences is finish and size. Mfg'd home are limited on size because they must move and they arent typically "high end" fit and finish.
 

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I wouldn't mind one at all, made in a controlled environment and made well enough to be moved. Can't say that about my house.
 

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Define "manufactured". Houses these days aren't built up from scratch on-site. In many cases, the roof members are brought in on a truck pre-built, and the walls as well.
 

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I live in one now. The house is over 25 years old. It has held up very well. I have updated many things along the way. It's pretty nice. No complaints.
 

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One of my wife's family members has one as a vacation home up in the Sierras. It essentially looks like a stick built tract home. I would have no problem living in one.

I saw some high end homes being built recently and they were lifting the complete rafters into place.

I think the line between stick built and manufactured home these days is getting pretty blurred. I think it will come down to where it is assembled. On site vs factory.

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Not sure about now, but used to be a difference between what was called a "manufactured home" (MH) and a modular home (MOD).

MH had a frame built into it and was placed on wheels a towed to the site. Could be two sections. The walls were usually less than 2x4. Usually not drywalled, but some other material. Roof pitch was usually shallow. Heating and AC was usually built into them. In the northeast they were not put on a full basement, but usually put on a slab. They might look nice from both the inside and outside, but you could tell, the casual buyer could tell, they were different from a stick built. Usually they would depreciate, and the materials tended to show wear quicker. Appliances are usually delivered as part of the MH.

The MOD, however, had no frame that wheels could go onto for transportation. Instead the sections had to be craned onto the transportation trailer, and then craned onto a foundation, which in the northeast was always a full basement. The construction was 2x4, often 2x6 for outside walls. The roof was standard pitch. Most materials, if not all, was the exact same as stick built. The house might be set up as a ranch, cape, or 2-story. They could be purchased as a shell, or with the interior drywalls and trim done, or even with all the cabinets and sinks installed at the factory. Plumbing was stubbed to the floor. On site a plumber and electrician would have to finish the connections. The furnace and A/C would also have to be done on site. The pipes, vents, and registers might be in place throughout the house when delivered, but they didn't go anywhere and need to be finished on site after a funace system was installed. Roofs were done, but had to be hinged up and finished on site.

Once the MOD was done, a casual buyer would not be able to tell the difference between a stick built. But if you look, from the basement looking up, you can see the marriage wall above you of how the sections came together. In the attic you can also see how the separate roof sections are joined. All interior would be the same materials, construction, and quality as stick built. Appliances typically purchased locally and are later installed on site, usually by the home buyer, although the MOD company could handle that and find a local appliance company to do it after the house has been set up.

With regard to quality differences between MOD and stick built, you get what you pay for. Some MOD companies offer highly customized and high quality packages. Some are more basic. But that is true of stick-built. There are probably some high end custom stick-buliders that stand out as better than both their stick-built competitors and any MOD offerings, but you will certainly pay a lot more for their wages.

The MH as a general rule were targeted at a lower price point and achieve those lower costs by using a less expensive design, build, transportation, and setup process. They also use different materials. They can be nice homes, but they meant to undercut the stick-built market for buyers wanting to spend less money.

The MOD are not all designed to be less expensive. Some are, due to economy of a central construction factory, and set-up packages that use basic and simple designs. But they also can have many customizations in design, and higher quality construction if you want pay for a better company, and better grades of cabinets, windows, carpet, whatever.



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Based on what I've read and heard from people who have them, I wouldn't hesitate as long as the price is right. If the kids are being buttheads about the price that may be a dealbreaker.
 

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Forgot to mention, one big reason for a home buyer to go with MOD over stick-built is time. If you buy some land and want to built a house. You can plan a 6 month (for example) time table. Pick out MOD company and house you want them to build for you, and set a delivery day. Then find an excavator to put in a driveway snd dig a foundation, and get a cement worker to build the basment. Have them coordinate (they probably know each other) on the due date of the house. Put them in contact with the MOD company. If you get that site work done in time, the MOD company WILL deliver. The set-up after delivery might only take a couple days to a week for the MOD company to finish everything you need them to do. You might have you own electrician and plumber and furnace people working for a week, or you could have paid the MOD company to do that after they setup. Get appliances delivered, get a home inspection, and move in.

Banks are really comfortable working with such a time table.

But if you are going to hire someone to build you a stick-built home, the potential for problems in delays, reliabilty, weather, working together, material shortages or timing of material deliveries, whatever. It is all more complex, lots more unknowns. Not saying it won't go well, but there are increased risks that you can't meet the time table the bank is expecting.

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Based on what I've read and heard from people who have them, I wouldn't hesitate as long as the price is right. If the kids are being buttheads about the price that may be a dealbreaker.
I second the notion of moving on if the kids are being unrealistic. After my experience with for sale by owner deals they should either proceed quickly or move on fast. I wasted time and money on a for sale by owner deal.

They are trying to make as much money as possible by selling it themselves and will not give up much and will likely be unrealistic.
 

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In Michigan, for insurance purposes, they are in the same class as mobile homes, even if they are on a foundation.

Thats interesting I have never heard of this before and I have been in the insurance business for over 13 years and in several different states.


/
 

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I too thought I may consider one some day, but not now. When I go to the hardware store for some odd or end I need for my regular home I see two types of parts.....one for "regular" homes and one for "m'fged" homes. One type looks much better and sturdier than the other.



You can guess which one. Besides, here in OK.......they attract storms/tornadoes like nobody's business.:shocked:
 

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They don't do well down here. But then again neither does anything not made out of blocks.

As was mentioned, theres a difference between manufactured homes and modular homes. Manufactured homes are trailers. Theres nothing against them - we have 'em on our hunting property. They're in use at jobsites across the world. They have their purposes. But they're not that great to live in and don't last all that long. Personally, I'd steer clear.

Modular homes, on the other hand, are on-par with any stick-built house out there these days. Still can't use 'em down here much because the moisture turns anything that isn't block into a wet noodle, but they're not bad houses at all. I've looked into them before and they set just like any other house.
 

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There is a reason that a MH isn't worth as much. ;)




Mr. HE:cool:
 
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