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Wife wants to start camping...

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by USMCsilver, Nov 19, 2002.

  1. USMCsilver

    USMCsilver Boat Life ©

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    Okay, it's been some years since boy scouts and the Corps wasn't exactly "camping"...

    What do people take these days?

    I have 2 sleeping bags, an Igloo 5 gallon water container, a Jansport pack with external frame, a Leatherman, and a Tahoe. I know I need the tent, duh.

    What else? I need a lantern I guess; what about a stove? Is that a common camping tool? She mentioned a cooler and sandwich stuff, but that sounds too "picnicy" to me.

    I want to go and have a good time and I don't mind "roughing" it, but I'm not sure exactly what she wants out of this.

    Anyway, toss out some ideas of other "essential" stuff I need to go on a decent camping trip.
     
  2. kels

    kels

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    A couple of air mattresses for under your sleeping bags. GRIN
    Your back will thank you in the morning.

    A small bag with basic medic type stuff.
    Any daily meds you take
    asprin/pain meds
    antibotic ointment w/pain reliever for small scrapes
    bug spray/sunscreen/sunburn spray
    bandaids
    tweezers/fingernail clippers
    antihistimes
    etc
    (those with kids will understand this list) GRIN

    Something to start a fire always helps.

    Good quality tent stakes. Something to hammer them in and take them
    out.

    More water than beer. Contrary to the belief of some. GRIN
     

  3. pizzaaguy

    pizzaaguy

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    Are you camping or backpacking?

    For camping, yes you want a stove...Coleman 2 burners are cheap.
    For cooking, you can usually get by with 1 pot and 1 frypan.
    Don't forget a perk coffe pot if you like coffee.

    Get a porta-potti, unless you want to have to escort her to the
    outhouse every 2 hours!

    Get a decent cooler. For extended stays, you can freeze your
    meat for days 2 thru whatever, and eat stuff as it thaws.

    Yes, get a gas lantern for out side the tent, but get a battery
    lantern for inside.

    Hope that helps,
    Richy


    ;)
     
  4. Sixgun_Symphony

    Sixgun_Symphony NRA4EVR

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    Do you like to cook?

    If so then go with a Dutch Ovens

    A hatchet is always useful for splitting fire wood. Get some tongs for handling coals to adjust cooking temperatures.

    Dutch Oven cookbooks
    Dutch Oven Cooking by John G. Ragsdale
    Cee Dub's Dutch Oven and Other Camp Cookin' by C. W. "Butch" Welch
    The Old-Fashioned Dutch Oven Cookbook by Don Holm, Myrtle Holm
    Lovin' Dutch Ovens: A Cook Book for the Dutch Oven Enthusiast by Joan S. Larsen

    These titles are available at Amazon.com
     
  5. P-990

    P-990 Certified Nutz

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    Camping? Definitely need a stove. The backpack is not such a major component if you can drive up to the campsite. Dutch oven cooking is lots of fun, but takes some practice to get things down. Air mattresses are the only way to go for a good night's sleep IMO. My personal favorite is called the Therm-A-Rest by Cascade Designs. Awesome piece of equipment in my experience.

    But I am a backpacker at heart. So I am accustomed to roughing it in a slightly rougher fashion than campers. I am a former Boy Scout, and I was always amused by the camping trips that looked like an Army mechanized unit deploying for battle! ;) Backpacking is so much easier. Can't fit it in your pack? Don't need it! ;f Good luck, and happy camping.
     
  6. Short Cut

    Short Cut PatrioticMember CLM

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    I'll second the vote for a self inflating Thermarest mattress and make it a big one like one of the Luxury Series. If she sleeps comfortably the whole experience will be the better for it. I also pack a small down pillow which seems like an extravagance especially with the limited space when I go motorcycle camping but to me it's 100 times better than sleeping on your rolled up Levis. You can start off with a simple candle lantern for light. They are small and light and the quality of light is nice for two people sitting at a picnic table. Lanterns are great for lighting up the whole campsite but they are so dang bright that they destroy your night vision too.


    Eureka! makes a good quality mid-priced tent. When the tent makers give a count for how many men a tent will accomodate take it with a grain of salt. IMO for two people you'll appreciate a 4 man tent and that will also give you some room to bring some gear inside.

    clic pics
    [​IMG]
    Camp Rest model.

    [​IMG]
    Tetragon model.
     
  7. TheGrip

    TheGrip Stockpiling

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    IMHO your home away from home should have some serious consideration.

    1. Find a tent that can hold 2 people PLUS gear comfortably.
    2. It's been raining since the middle of the night AND the inside of your tent is dry (Bathtub Floor)
    3. The Rain Fly extends over your entrance, COMPLETELY covering it from driving rain.
    4. You have correctly used a product called SEAM SEALER on all tent and rain fly seams.
    5. Adequate ventilation.
    6. Use some sort of "tarp" under the tent.
    The tarp should be sized to fit EXACTLY the floorshape of the tent, less 1/2" so water or debris will not catch.
    7. Before your first trip, set it up WITH your wife to familiarize yourselves with it.

    I may not be stressing the point of waterproofness enough.
    Make no mistake, it's for your comfort. :)
    Do not be afraid to set-up the tent on the sales floor and get in it with your wife. Lie down in it. Roll around.
    You will be glad you did.
    If purchasing over the net, find a store that carries at least something comparable and test it out.
    When you get back from your trip, set it up for a couple of hours to air or dry it out.

    With tents, you get what you pay for.
     
  8. Short Cut

    Short Cut PatrioticMember CLM

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    Totally agree. If you know how often you will use it and in what type of weather it will help to zero in on an appropriate price range. I recommend the Eureka! tents to folks who will camp a couple of times per year where there is a possibility of rain. The Eureka! will fit that mode very well and will last much longer than the cheaper tents.

    My favorite tent for solo or two person camping any time of year even in heavy snow or rain is my green Bibler Ahwahnee. It is a single layer tent and is completely waterproof and breathes exceptionally well. The body releases a 1/4 cup of moisture per hour and if a tent doesn't breath the moisture will form as condensation beads on the inside of the tent. The tent costs approximately $700 but for someone that camps regularly and year round it is a superb tent.

    clic pic
    [​IMG]
     
  9. USMCsilver

    USMCsilver Boat Life ©

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    Thanks for the replies. I forgot to add that I do have a very nice first aid kit, so that stuff is covered. Sunscreen and bugspray this time of the year won't be needed.

    I thought about an air mattress, but I dunno if I will bother for the first excursion.

    As far as the trips go, it beats me what kind of camping we will do or where it will be done. I am guessing somewhere in NC up in the hills. Hopefully near a stream so I can take the fishin' pole.

    I am thinking about getting a tent from Bass Pro Shops. It is a Coleman IIRC. It is a nice 6 or 8 person with "room dividers". I like this idea because all the crap can be on one side and we can be on the other. When I camped as a kid, we always brought along a cheap pup tent to house the gear.

    I guess I could swing a little Coleman stove. They look very handy and easy to use.

    I just don't want to go shucking a bunch of money into this because I'm not sure if she will want to do it very often. She loves the outdoors, but she would rather be at a resort than the sticks even though she may say differently.

    Thanks again; all the imput has been great!
     
  10. P-990

    P-990 Certified Nutz

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    Short Cut, I agree with this whole-heartedly. And also the statement about taking capacity ratings with a grain of salt. My troop always had a joke about 2-person tent capacity: She better be really hot!! And the Eureka! tents are fairly standard items at most shops I've perused. Last time I went camping was in June with my senior class. We got hit with major rain, and my girlfriend and I were the only ones dry and warm the whole weekend. Remember, it pays to take advice from somebody who has (yawn) been there before. ;)

    PS: My tent is a Eureka! Timberlite 2, but I will confess I have been looking around for "upgrades." ;v
     
  11. Short Cut

    Short Cut PatrioticMember CLM

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    At the very least get a foam pad. For my kids I use an Army surplus foam pad. The cost me $10 a piece and they are very lightweight. Otherwise your body will be unsuccessfully trying to heat the earth all night. In other words the cold ground will transmit its temperature to your body without some type of an insulated pad between you.
     
  12. Old Blue

    Old Blue

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    From experience: Anything you can do to make her more comfortable will make the whole experience much more enjoyable for both of you. Don't let your friends make you feel guilty that you are not "roughing it". They are not the ones who will have to deal with your tired, achy, mosquito-bitten wife. The air mattress is well worth it. Something comfortable to sit on around the campfire is a must.

    Again, from experience: Make sure she packs appropriate shoes for the activities you will be doing (hiking, fishing, wading in the streams, etc.) and more than one pair, for when the first one gets wet. Anything with any kind of heel or elevation has absolutely no place on your camping trip, no matter how comfortable she thinks they are around the house.

    Most importantly, the better time she has on your first outing, the more likeley she is to want to go on a second...and a third...and so on.
     
  13. andrewy

    andrewy

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    Wow... I can't believe nobody mentioned this yet....

    Don't forget the Glock! ;)


    AndrewY
    www.thehuts.net
     
  14. J. Parker

    J. Parker

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    I introduced my wife to camping about twelve years ago when we first met. I'll be straight-up with ya......tent camping sucks the big one. I did it with the wifey and three kids for ten years until I discovered RV's.

    Get an RV and you'll never look back. A used travel trailer, maybe 17 to 21 feet long, for $4,000 or so. A used camper for the same price if you have a pickup. "Tent" camping is for tree huggers.
     
  15. hagar

    hagar Millennium Member

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    Look into one of these portable power packs. We use ours for a lot of things, inflating the air mattress, recharging the 500,000 candle handheld spotlight, playing the CD player with a 110 volt converter, powering the trolling motor on a rubber boat, jumpstarting the car etc etc. Buy a queen size air matress and 12V electric pump, sleeping comfortably is the MOST important thing after keeping dry, and for $25 for the mattress, it will be the best money you ever spent.
     
  16. Arbee

    Arbee

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    The big Coleman tents are usually a waste of money. They are okay if you have perfect weather, but if there is wind and rain you'll be sorry. If you are not sure you are going to do this more than once, why not RENT some of the stuff? Are there any high-end back packing shops, or an REI store in yur area? Most rent tents and the air mattresses mentioned in above posts. Rent a good 4 person tent and see how you like it. Buy one electric lantern, a large cooler (even a cheap styrofoam one would get you through a weekend) and a coleman stove. Take a pot and a pan from home. The tent is the big expense and you'll be miseable or worse in a cheap one with no mattress if it is bad weather at all, so rent. Most shops will also apply the rental cost towards a tent purchase when you return the rent tent. Then if you both decide you don't like camping, you still have a coleman stove and an battery lantern for emergencies, but have not wasted money on a tent and mattresses you won't use again.
     
  17. JimM_PA

    JimM_PA

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    Hmmmmmm....the RV suggestion has alot of merit, and if you go that route, this stuff won't go to waste either....works for tailgate parties if nothing else.
    Coleman propane stove with electronic ignition, Coleman propane gas lantern....both do double duty here if the power goes out.
    Eureka tents....if your not carrying it far, a 4-man dome tent works and gives you pretty good bang for the buck.
    I like Lodge dutch ovens also....flat bottom for use at home and on the Coleman stove.
    A couple of 9x12 poly tarps with plenty of 1/4" nylon line or 550 cord....for shade, privacy, rain, wind protection.
    Cooking and eating utensils in a separate container with salt, pepper, coffee creamer, matches.....etc. Paper towels, handi wipes, pepto bismal, immodium, plus your well-equiped first aid kit.
    Small flashlights for the "What was that?....".
    Fold up chairs and a small folding table.
    Truth be told, the camping and cooking lessons learned in boy scouts have come in handy many times in the years since.
    Good luck. I hope she enjoys it.
    Jim
     
  18. Arbee

    Arbee

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    I'll second the folding chair idea. If you are car camping they are great. If you are even just going fishing for the day, they are great to have along in the car or SUV.

    If this is your first time out, I suggest considering a state park. In many areas they tend to be relatively safe and some have amenities such as cafe, convenience store, fishing shop, restrooms with showers, and running water. Some are more primitive, of course. It is really quite easy to be comfortable while camping or back packing if you have good stuff and know how to use it. As others have said: pitch the tent once before you go, and plan to set it up while there is still day light. Give all equipment such as stoves and lanterns a trial run.

    Check out the REI website; I bet they have suggested equipment lists for different kinds of camping as well as a good survey of different kinds of tents and other equipment at various price levels. You don't have to buy or rent the most expensive, but avoid the bargain stuff at Wal-Mart, Oshman's, Bass Pro, etc.

    A few years ago a fishing buddy and I camped out in what should have been cool temperatures with plenty of fish in the river, but a heat wave came through along with a thunderstorm. His usually sturdy tent held up to the wind but sprung a leak somewhere. And no fish. This was not a good time. It was the kind of time that if it was your first time, you would swear it off forever. If you do it long enough you will have a bad-time story, too, but try not to guarantee it's on your first trip by skipping on essential comforts like Thermarest mattresses and a solid tent.

    Good luck.
     
  19. NMGlocker

    NMGlocker BOOM headshot

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    RV's are for old folks, and candy-asses. ;)
    Tents are for wusses too.
    I just toss my bag on the ground, and if it rains I crawl into my bivy-sack.
    Of course the wife won't go with me when I do that.......... hehehehe.
    ;f
     
  20. arnold ziffle

    arnold ziffle aka dingle

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    a big enough tent that will hold two chairs and your beds will go a long way toward making her comfortable. number one is a place for her to pee. there are some light weight portable toilets that are breifcase size.