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WI deer opener report

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by rfb45colt, Nov 23, 2002.

  1. rfb45colt

    rfb45colt safe-cracker

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    Today was the big day. Opening of the 9 day gun deer season. Legal shooting time in my area was 6:38am. I was in my tree stand, ready to rock, at 5:45am. It was overcast, 26 degrees, with a light snow falling, 2" snow on the ground, and no wind. Perfect! I saw two deer moving through the woods at 6:10... 28 minutes too early to shoot... about 60 yards out. Couldn't tell what they were, it was still too dark. At 6:45, I saw a deer (a doe) walking from left to right, about 100-120 yds away. Way too far to try a shot with my .45 Colt Ruger Blackhawk. As I watched her with my binocs, I noticed she kept looking back over her shoulder. I scanned her back trail, and sure enough, a nice buck was trailing behind her by about 40 yds. He too was too far away to try a shot with a revolver (I'm bringing my .280 Rem tomorrow, in addition to the pistol). He appeared, then disappeared behind the young 5-10' tall balsam trees, then appeared again briefly, then gone, etc. They were heading away... I watched them til they were no longer visible. I didn't see another deer until about 3:15pm... then all hell broke loose. There were deer everywhere. A medium sized doe and a young spike buck walked under my stand at a range of about 30 yds. I whacked the doe with my .45... she went down where she stood. The 300gr Cast Performance LBT broke both shoulders. One "meat" tag filled, one buck tag and three more doe tags to go. I packed up my stuff, and as I got ready to climb down to tag her, I saw another deer approaching... then another... then another! I unholstered the Blackhawk, then froze as the deer approached. One was a young doe, the other two were young bucks... one was a spike, the other a forkhorn. I let them pass by at 15 yards. One meat deer to drag the half-mile back to the truck is enough for one day. (If it had been "Ole mossy horns" that would've been differant, but immature bucks get a pass, so they can grow into big bucks.;)) I saw nine deer today, in the same area, where in 60 hours of bowhunting the past few weeks, I saw not hide nor hair of a single deer. Go figure. :)

    I registered my deer at the nearest DNR station. I donated the head to be tested for CWD disease. I should've taken a picture first. I took one of the .45 slug's exit hole, after I hung the deer in my barn. It's below. If the sight of a beheaded deer will bother you, don't click on the pic. There's no blood or gore visible... just a large exit hole, center of the shoulder, just behind the neck. I've shot 6 deer with these .452" hard cast bullets, and have yet to recover one. :)
     
  2. paynter2

    paynter2 It ain't over Millennium Member

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    Well? How did day two go? Or are you too tired to write about it?
     

  3. Michigun

    Michigun Miss Michigan?

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    Dang dude... they took a lot of meat with that head!

    Congratulations!

    I hope not too much shoulder meat was wasted with that .45 hole.
     
  4. ithaca_deerslayer

    ithaca_deerslayer

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    You literally were "under a pine tree, surrounded by deer!"

    Good shot.

    Was the entry hole in the location on the other side? Did you aim for the shoulder? Personally, I like to aim for the spot just behind the elbow (but odds of hitting the shoulder itself are pretty high, too).
     
  5. rfb45colt

    rfb45colt safe-cracker

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    The entry hole was directly opposite, but just a little bit higher (she was 30yds out on level ground, I was 18' up in a pine tree). Hit exactly where I aimed... slight downward angle, so I hit a bit above center, angling down through to center on the other side. I used to aim just behind the shoulder (still do with a bow), but I learned from experience, that although that shot is almost always fatal, they can run more than 100yds before they expire if they've got four good legs. I've dragged too many deer from a nastyass swamp... deer that I shot on high ground, but they ran straight for the thickest, baddest cover around... then they died. There's a fairly steep ridge about 175 yds away. I've had to drag more than one deer up that ridge, and one was enough. Some have run 100-200yds while they were dead... they just didn't know it yet. By hitting the shoulder directly in the center, and with a pass through shot from a good hard-cast bullet with plenty of power exiting the opposite shoulder, they normally drop in their tracks... and are dead upon contact with the ground, or very shortly thereafter. It's like flipping off a switch... BANG!... then smack, they hit the ground. They can't run with two broken shoulders. Not a single step. If they're in a bad spot for retrieval, then don't shoot 'em until they clear it. This one was about 20' off an abandoned old fire trail. Easy draggin'. :)

    Day two and day three were not as good as the first. Only saw three very young deer in both days. I'll be in my other tree stand tomorrow morning, by 5:30 am. This one is located in very thick cover, where visibility is 25yds max (if you're on the ground), and it's where the deer usually go to hideout after the shooting starts. I usually wait a few days before hitting that spot. The tracks in the snow indicate it should be full of deer by now. They go out in the dark to browse, and trickle in just before sunrise, and bed down. Last year, I watched about dozen come in, and lay down, some only yards away. It's my ace-in-the-hole stand, and it too is 18' up in a big white pine . ;f

    Although I saw few deer yesterday and today, at least I was "entertained". Several scavengers are after the gut pile from Saturday's deer. There is a large adult female weasel that lives in a hollow tree about 100 yds from where I shot and field dressed the doe. Last year, she had two young-uns following her around, but I haven't seen any young ones with her this year, so far. That weasel looks forward to my coming... because I've shot 5 deer within 100yds of her home in the past few years. :) Before shooting the deer Saturday afternoon, I watched her peering from the dead tree she calls home... watching me. She was probably thinking "Yippee, he's back... another good Thanksgiving dinner is on the way... yum yum". I left the heart and liver for her to enjoy, too. Yesterday, she defended her treasures from a coyote. He was too smart to mess with her. She spent the better part of today chasing away crows and jays.

    If you don't like trackin' & draggin' much, and want the deer down where it stands, then try the center of the shoulder-blade shot. It really doesn't waste too much meat with a bullet that penetrates rather than expands. I wouldn't do it with a shotgun slug or a hollow point, however.