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Why doesn't the B2 bomber have vertical stabilizers?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Roogalator, Nov 4, 2004.

  1. Roogalator

    Roogalator Senior Grackle

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    Is there some other aspect of its design that compensates for not having vertical stabilizers?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Stuckinhell

    Stuckinhell

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    It has a pretty sophisticated fly-by-wire computer which deflects one of the B-2's many movable surfaces, when needed, to achieve stability.
     

  3. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    I think the intent with the design of Northrop’s original flying wing was that it reduced drag. With the new flying wing, it also reduces the radar signature. Notice there are no flat, vertical surfaces anywhere.
     
  4. BillCola

    BillCola Supreme Cmdr ®

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    The B2 is one case where I actually believe in voodoo.
     
  5. Roogalator

    Roogalator Senior Grackle

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    Any idea of the handling characteristics of this bird? Is it one of those really cantankerous machines that's trying to kill you every second you're in the air, and that only a very few highly trained individuals can handle? Or does it behave itself?
     
  6. podwich

    podwich

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    It is my understanding that the B2 is one of those machines that would like to kill you. However, the flight computers don't let it do so (at least without you trying yourself).
     
  7. CaptainOveur

    CaptainOveur

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    The computers probably make it fly like any large jet (it has Boeing 757 landing gear trucks :) ).

    If you want to read about things other than a vertical stabilizer that contribute to "stability", go buy a copy of "Aerodynamics for Naval Aviators". This is the "bible" as far as aerodynamics are concerned.
     
  8. One Ragged Hole

    One Ragged Hole Dis ain't funny

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    B2's use drag rudders, which open like a clamshell on the trailing edge. They cause the craft to yaw towards the side of the one that opens because of aerodynamic drag. No vertical surfaces are needed with this method. Some old German designs had a tube with holes that extended from the wingtip to cause a turn. The F117 was called "The Wobblin Goblin" by the first pilots that flew it. The Air Force was not amused. I think the B2 would be in the same league. I know the original Northrop wing (XB47) had a tendency to porpoise in level flight.
    O-R-H
     
  9. CaptainOveur

    CaptainOveur

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    BTW, this is from WWII :D
     
  10. CanadianGlockFan

    CanadianGlockFan

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    Vertical stabilizers would also make this plane's radar signature very much larger than it currently is, which sort of defeats the purpose of the plane to begin with.