Why Does the PPK Endure?

Discussion in 'General Firearms Forum' started by MGGLOCK9, Oct 1, 2020.

  1. AF-Odin

    AF-Odin

    Messages:
    955
    Likes Received:
    1,254
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007
    Location:
    Central Texas
    Back in the early 70s I really wanted a PPK/s, but what I could afford was an Astra Constable in .380 (closely resembles the PPK/s) which I bought in 1975 for $140 at Wal-Mart in Arkansas. Was a nice concealed gun for many years, but is now eclipsed by the mini-9mm's. Shot well for 45 years, but last July on the range suffered a catastrophic failure of the safety and hammer. Had a devil of a time finding parts, but did find a company that makes parts for out of production guns. Now just waiting for the gunsmith to replace those two parts.
     
  2. ThatGuyYouKnow

    ThatGuyYouKnow

    Messages:
    586
    Likes Received:
    717
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2020
    "The one-eyed man is king in the land of the blind."
     
    boilergonzo likes this.

  3. hannstv

    hannstv

    Messages:
    2,330
    Likes Received:
    5,207
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2008
    I have a PPK/S that was built in W. Germany. I bought it in the late 70's. I don't believe it has ever bobbled and is very accurate. There are a lot of better carry options but I would feel horrible if this was mt EDC. Double action is heavy!
     
  4. mac66

    mac66 Huge Member Millennium Member

    Messages:
    10,889
    Likes Received:
    8,537
    Joined:
    Oct 28, 1999
    Location:
    Blue Planet
    Good point
     
  5. Jim2527

    Jim2527

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    29
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2018
    IMHO the PPK in stainless steel is a beautiful gun. Winston Churchill said the 3 best guns ever created were the 1911, Luger and PPK. It’s a gun with a lot of history.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2020
    boilergonzo and LPD ret. like this.
  6. CBTENGR

    CBTENGR

    Messages:
    376
    Likes Received:
    199
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2020
    Location:
    Mid Missouri
    The PPK is iconic, in part from the Bond movies and also there were enough brought back in GI's duffle bags after WWII.

    I have never owned one but have shot the 32 and 380 versions. And yes the DA trigger pull is bad. The 32 is more pleasant to shoot compared to the 380. I have the PPK's Hungarian cousin, the FEG PA-63 in 9x18. It is the same as far as horrible DA trigger pull and slide bite. And the PA63 in 9x18 with it's aluminum frame makes a PPK in 380 seem pretty tame.
     
  7. bac1023

    bac1023

    Messages:
    125,053
    Likes Received:
    26,911
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2004
    Location:
    PA
    It’s an icon, though I never liked it
     
  8. jhooten

    jhooten NRA Life Member

    Messages:
    897
    Likes Received:
    330
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2003
    Location:
    Central Texas.
    Hi-Point.
     
  9. taurn88

    taurn88

    Messages:
    290
    Likes Received:
    136
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2010
    I had a Polish P64 in 9x18.. now that was terrible to shoot! I only got through 2 mags and called it quits.

    I am curious about the newer PPKs, I haven't held one yet but from the pictures I've seen, the quality looks subpar.
     
  10. Tuscany

    Tuscany

    Messages:
    640
    Likes Received:
    658
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2014
    Location:
    Northeast Tennessee
    The summer I turned 16 I had a worn out 56' Chevy with three blue wheels and one green one. I also had a summer job working for the Manpower company, and yes it was exactly the kind of work you would expect from a company with that name.

    I saved my money because I wanted a center fire handgun. My Dad's only handgun was a Colt Woodsman. By the end of the summer I had saved enough for a genuine Walther PPK and my Dad bought it for me using my money. This was just before the '68 Gun Control Act. My new PPK was made in France as I remember and it was in .380 caliber. I was a James Bond fan then as well, but it was the coolest looking gun I had seen at that time regardless of Bond.

    I never had any problems with mine. I shot it all I could afford and it worked very well and it did not jam, period. The double action trigger was very heavy, but since it was the only DA/SA gun I had ever used I thought was just normal.

    I was probably more pleased with that handgun than the many, many dozens I've owned since simply because it was my first. I only read about the reportedly harsh recoil of a .380 and slide bite years later. I never experience slide bite on that gun nor did I think the recoil was especially harsh in my teenage and young man's hands. It is after all a heavy steel gun from a late 1920's design.

    My Glock 42 is a much, much better "using" pistol, but it is a 21st century design and has just zero visual or handling appeal. It isn't something I look at with loving eyes or handle for it's in-the-hand feel, although it is the one I chose when deciding on a .380 caliber handgun.

    After returning from the Marine Corps I was back in college and married. I needed money more than I needed the PPK so it was sold. Do I wish I had it back? No, at my stage in life I can afford any handgun I want, but I won't buy another PPK although they are still the best looking auto loading handgun ever made with that great feel.

    Like any other gun, if you don't like it then just don't buy one. Others have posted here about their pleasure of ownership and reliable operation of their PPKs. This classic gun has been made for the past 90 years, several decades of that before James Bond became a household word. There is something about it beyond the fictional Bond character that has kept it going.

    So, soldier on PPK, you've got a lot of admirers and none of them owes anyone else an explanation for their attraction to this old gun design.
     
    boilergonzo and MGGLOCK9 like this.