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Why case prep is important

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by dudel, Oct 17, 2010.

  1. dudel

    dudel

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    Got a load of 45ACP SP from my once-fired brass guy. He's always supplied good stuff in the past. No exception here.

    Processed a boatload of Speer Friday and yesterday. I normally punch out the primers with a Lee universal decapper, then tumble them. The media does a good job of cleaning out the pockets, but I still run give them a quick touch with a pocket cleaner. The picture below shows why.

    Out of several hundred cases, there was one case with a large primer (same headstamp), there was also another where the top of the primer came off but the sleeve was still in the pocket. Either of these would have made a mess while reloading (the LP would have dribbled powder, while the non empty pocket might have caused a primer detonation).

    Not a big deal to do while sorting brass. In this case, it turn out to be all Speer, with a few variations on the theme.
     

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    Last edited: Oct 17, 2010
  2. byf43

    byf43 NRA Life Member

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    A good friend of mine bought a few hundred pieces of 9mm brass at a gunshow a few years ago (Magtech) and most of the primers did exactly what your center piece of brass shows.

    He didn't discover it, until he was loading his 9mm on my Dillon RL550B.

    He was seating a Win SP primer and it went "Pop!" and scared the crap out of him!

    I had offered him some safety glasses before he started, and he refused.
    When that primer went off, he asked if I still had those safety glasses that I had previously offered.

    We wound up using a Lee decapper to remove the primers, and almost 60% of those primers did the same thing.

    A very small screwdriver was used to pry the primer ring out of those cases.
     

  3. dudel

    dudel

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    I bet he's a bit more careful now! Good idea on the small screw driver. I was using a drill bit turned in by hand as a screw extractor. It works; but it's slow.

    Ya gotta be careful with strange brass.
     
  4. sdelam

    sdelam

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    I have had it happpen on several calibers, .223 seems to be the most frequent for me but I catch those while running them though the Dillon 600.

    If it don't feel right, stop and investigate.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2010
  5. dudel

    dudel

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    Now that you mention it, the punched primer does seem to happen more often on the crimped .223 rounds. Doesn't seem to be as big a problem on the non crimped rounds.

    Still, these Speers were non crimped (the Fed NT 45ACP Sp is crimped). From the corrosion on the case of the center one, it looks like this one may have been left on the range longer than the other and had some corrosion between the primer and the pocket.
     
  6. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel

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    Wow, thats a good reason to avoid once fired brass. Sounds unsafe and like a lot of work.



    ;)
     
  7. dudel

    dudel

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    You bet! I'll send you my address so you can forward me all your once fired brass. I'll even pay for shipping :supergrin:

    I'll see if I can dig up my pictures of problems with new brass. It's not a free ride there either. I had a few, from reputuable sources, with no flash hole(!), or with the chad still attached to the flash hole.

    New brass can be a pain as well. Feel free to send me any new brass you don't care to deal with. :embarassed:

    You'll spend time somewhere, it may as well be while there are less things going on.
     
  8. freakshow10mm

    freakshow10mm 10mm Advocate

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    Always inspect brass, even new brass. I found some new brass that had off center flash holes and even a few with no flash hole punched.
     
  9. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel

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    Every time I need brass it just shows up in my truck some how. I guess I am just lucky like that.

    I have never had a issue with any of that brass (it's police stuff). I never inspect it or anything. I just tumble and load it. I need to find some wood to knock on.
     
  10. chris in va

    chris in va

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    All the more reason why I like loading with my Lee Hand Press. I get to inspect every single case at least three times during the process.
     
  11. dudel

    dudel

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    Heh! I seem to do that prepping brass for with a progresive. I must like the feel of brass. What's the rush?
     
  12. kelevra

    kelevra

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    I've ran into the same problem with federal brass. I was lucky and didn't "pop" a primer but from the distorted look of the primer it was close enough.