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I think I like that Barrel;Blok thing.

It's like a permanent snap cap? I'm not sure about the part that goes into the magazine. What does that do?

I did go to the website. Didn't read anything about the magazine part .
 

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Millenium #3936
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I dont understand how anyone can sit there and say practicing is bad, especially when it comes to a skill that involves life or death...but here we are.
Brother.. firstly, I do not feel that its intellectually honest to frame my comment to suggest that I am saying "practice is bad". I clearly placed my comment within a reasonable context. Whether or not "practice" is good or bad (productive or unproduction) economical or costly ( concervative or wasteful) a benefit or a drawback.. often depends on many things.

Pulling a trigger is not rocket science and I seriously doubt that ANY self defense action is going to hinge on the difference between what someone who dry fires daily can do -vs- some guy who only pulls the trigger on the range a few times a year.

I have always acquainted myself with any new gun and I do so in just a few minutes of thoughtful articulation. I solidify the experience during live fire, not sitting around my house.

If someone wants to sit around dry firing.. fine, I aint mad at them. As I said, I feel that its an endeavor which quickly reaches the point of diminished returns.

In my opinion there are plenty of things(skills) which may tip the scales of combat in your favor but dry firing aint it. People can dry fire if they want but I will simply "check that box" and apply time and effort towards things I feel are much more critical.
 
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I dont understand how anyone can sit there and say practicing is bad, especially when it comes to a skill that involves life or death...but here we are.
Diminished returns does not mean practice is bad, quite the opposite. Learning how to pull a trigger is pretty basic in the scheme of things. If it takes an inordinate amount of time to learn a Glock's trigger, then it's time to move on to a platform with a short learning curve, IMO.

Learning to accurately shoot while moving is more practical than sitting in a recliner and pulling a trigger. To me, that is what diminishing returns is all about, having a mindset, mindset, mindset to engage in critical scenarios has a much higher priority than dry firing for hours at a time. Focus on the package, whether it be sport shooting, critical situations or both; it's not rocket science. YMMV :)
 
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Why? Because in my view, it quickly reaches a point of diminished returns. Unless of course if you are a bullseye shooter. I am definitely not any sort of gun gamer or exhibition shooter. I am simply a guy who wants to defend himself in a fight. I have never had any problem maintaining meaningful accuracy over the decades and I have never experienced any sort of difficulty or problem related to combat accuracy (torso zone).
So, since you don't do it, no one else needs to either. Got it.
 

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I don’t do a lot of dry fire because TV sets, wall repair take time to dispose of/fix. ;). ;)
I have done holster presentation practice. Unloaded gun, holstered, covered. Draw, aim, dry fire, reload, rack dry fire.

Yrs back I had a range holster, mag holder. (No retention straps). After few life fire reps, put on carry holster, mag carrier with straps/flap. Did same drill. My reload was faster from covered mag holder. Because it was trained.
For me the presentation part is useful.
 

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Millenium #3936
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So, since you don't do it, no one else needs to either. Got it.
if that is what you get from the couple of hundred words I said in this thread, you have missed the point. I clearly outlined several circumstances where I consider the practice to likely be worth the effort as well as the reasons why I dont. I do not mind disagreement but lets not omit information which is integral to the primary point.

Generally speaking, I have learned more from people who I disagree with than I ever learned from those who sit around nodding their heads when someone speaks.

I may not be right about anything I have ever said on this forum over the past 20 years but I am not one who sits around watching youtube or parroting things that other people say. I tell people what I think based on my own training, knowledge and experiences.
 

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Millenium #3936
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I'm happy for you, but I guess most people need more than a box to get reasonably acquainted with a trigger. At least I do.
English is not my first language but I was not talking about a box of ammo. I said it was a box to be checked. That simply means that I acquaint myself and figuratively "check that goal off the list" and move on. I clearly stated that I solidify the experience with live fire. I never said anything about how many round or boxes that would take.
 

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I may not be right about anything I have ever said on this forum over the past 20 years but I am not one who sits around watching youtube or parroting things that other people say. I tell people what I think based on my own training, knowledge and experiences.
Hey, there's probably always going to be some disagreement between the folks who talk about things because they've read about it, and those who share experiences because they've done it. (And it's usually better if those experiences were successful examples. ;) )

Book knowledge and experiential knowledge may be at opposite ends of a spectrum ... or maybe it's a circle where the best of both types of knowledge may meet. Dunno.
 

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After 50 plus years of shooting I don't think dry firing will help me all that much. I prefer live firing.
 
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