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View attachment 862614 [QUOTE = "DienBienPhu, post: 29869842, member: 43146"] Uso una replica di una pistola ad aria compressa come strumento per fondere, disegnare e puntare a "fuoco secco", fanno repliche eccellenti che hanno l'aspetto e la sensazione di una vera pistola, salvo usura sulla mia vera pistola

a volte uso anche i cappucci a scatto, se prevedi di fare fuoco a secco estensivo usa un cappuccio a scatto, non consiglierei di sparare a secco e far cadere il vetrino sulle camere vuote della tua pistola da trasporto. [/ CITAZIONE]
This right?
If you are asking if the photo is right for a snap cap, yes.

Se stai chiedendo se la foto è giusta per un tappo a scatto, sì.
 

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Interesting you posted this. I just got done doing draws and dry fire. Since my health dipped, last year, I’ve been too fat to get my duty belt on (former LEO). I decided to see if I could squeeze into it. Gladly, I got it on, not pretty, but it was on.

It’s amazing how smooth my draw is, out of my multi-retention duty holster. I didn’t even have to work at it, today. Just think it and the G22 was out and in my hand. Of course, this comes from years of practice on the same system (I’ve had this setup since 2013).

Before most shifts, I didn’t walk out the door until I had three smooth draws, in a row. If things were slow, I would pull over and draw to the ditch. We had offices shared with one other Deputy. My office mate and I usually worked different shifts. No one cared if we went to the office and practiced draws or dry fire.

ETA: Make sure you remove live ammunition, before practicing.
Thank you for your service! I go back many decades when there were height requirements and .357mag carry. IMO, trigger reset is as important as trigger pull, it's a hand in glove part of shooting, sport or critical situations. Also in my opinion, it's easier to go from revolver training to pistol training in becoming proficient.

A very simple way to learn trigger pull and reset w/o live fire, is dry firing a revolver with a quarter on the top strap. It only takes a few minutes of balancing the quarter on the top rib to learn trigger pull and reset.

Like you, when I pull a 27-2/5" it's a going home type of feeling and I can still push fast split times shooting mag ammunition...and while moving.

This carries over to Glocks, but I feel more confident and better shooting Styers, again it goes back to trigger pull and reset...cold. In personal defense, it's first shot placement cold, no warming up. Bare hands at ~25F has a very different feeling than 75F practicing.

Mindset, skillset, toolset, in that order. :)

Thank you for sharing.
 

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Dry firing is like masturbating to porn, and simulated driving games----something critical is missing. You are only practicing 1/2 or less of the "drill".

Yes you can dry fire all you want, but when your live ammo goes BANG, and your gun kicks, lo and behold, your trigger control, your mind, grip, and sight picture go to crap. So it can be incomplete and almost useless when in the real thing.
You need to post a picture of some of your national championship trophies, so you will have some credibility against everybody else with those trophies who all say dry firing is the key to mastering marksmanship.
 

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I have the laser lite laser cartridge and target for a sig 220. It is good for several things. Trigger and sight control ( especially double action); sights on target on the draw and push out, and trigger control; and finally, no one ever shot them self in the knee and drew blood.
 

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I have looked at that and think it is pretty good. They have a new one that has the MantisX incorporated into it. MantisX is a great system.
 

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Someone mentioned above that dry fire will hurt a pre Gen 5 Glock. I spend a lot of time dry firing my Glock 19 Gen 3, but it always has a G-sight laser in the barrel. Does the laser help with not damaging the gun in anyway?
 

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Can you cite any specific accounts? I can’t see how dry fire can put any stress what so ever on the breech face. Please elaborate where you got that info from. Sorry but that statement makes no common sense.

Dry-fire with a striker-type firing pin design, like that in a Glock (99, M&P, etc), means the front flat part of the firing pin head slams against the rear of the breech face unless the impact is cushioned by the firing pin tip impacting a primer cup, or primer-substitute (snap-cap).

In the typical hammer-fired pistol, with a tapered firing pin, the tapered body of the firing pin passes through the firing pin hole, but there isn't the same type of "head" right behind the tip of the firing pin slamming up against the breech face.

Consider that the breech face is also being pounded by the base of the case being forced against it, during firing, before the bullet leaves the barrel and the pressure starts to drop. This is also happening along with heat produced by the fired round(s).

Basically, the breech face gets continually hammered (under heat) from the front during live-fire, and with the "headed" striker-type firing pin it can also be hammered from the rear (without heat) during dry-fire, especially if done without cushioning the firing pin's impact by use of a snap-cap.

Now, apparently also if there's any mistake in the manufacture of steel alloy which might lead to hydrogen embrittlement, reduced ductility and load bearing, and cracking, might occur.

... I go back many decades when there were height requirements and .357mag carry. IMO, trigger reset is as important as trigger pull, it's a hand in glove part of shooting, sport or critical situations. Also in my opinion, it's easier to go from revolver training to pistol training in becoming proficient.
...
Mindset, skillset, toolset, in that order. :)

Yep, learning the importance of trigger recovery in shooting a DA revolver is critical, and learning it right can help someone make the transition from using revolvers to pistols a lot easier, than going the other way 'round (pistols to revolvers).

We noticed that when our agency transitioned from service revolvers to TDA pistols many years ago. ;)
 

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Hello friends, yesterday I went to the armory before the Lockdown to buy these look good total aluminum, a problem but they are 10mm ... :)).
06.11.2020 011.jpg
 

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I have looked at that and think it is pretty good. They have a new one that has the MantisX incorporated into it. MantisX is a great system.
what i use and have so far is this:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00OMCTX96
with this:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07K34W265

and for my max available 20ft distance in the basement where my home office is - it works ok.

dunno if it would worth to invest into any 'systems' or other contraptions, as, yet, you can draw, you can work on pointing and hands stability, but, to throw a $100 for a mag like that - dunno. i do not mind to pull a slide and i do not think it damages it much, at all. it is a gun.
 

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what i use and have so far is this:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00OMCTX96
with this:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07K34W265

and for my max available 20ft distance in the basement where my home office is - it works ok.

dunno if it would worth to invest into any 'systems' or other contraptions, as, yet, you can draw, you can work on pointing and hands stability, but, to throw a $100 for a mag like that - dunno. i do not mind to pull a slide and i do not think it damages it much, at all. it is a gun.
I am a firearms instructor and have the stuff to use in my classroom. In my apartment, I can get 33 feet from my target so that does me well. I have a few markings on the floor to indicate different distances.
 

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The only problem I have with dry firing is that I think is can lead to complacency and can make trigger pulling a mindless habit... with obvious consequences.

I'm sure it has a place in training, but I think making a "habit" of it is dangerous.
 

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The only problem I have with dry firing is that I think is can lead to complacency and can make trigger pulling a mindless habit... with obvious consequences.

I'm sure it has a place in training, but I think making a "habit" of it is dangerous.
As a first car accident makes you to keep your distance- a first accidental trigger pull makes one respect the weapon. :)
 

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I just picked up an airsoft G-19. This has the same weight, size, trigger feel and the slide racks between shots just as a real G-19. Heck it even comes apart like one. This will be my training tool.

You can draw, aim , fire and reset trigger without using real ammo. I plan on limiting range firing due to the uncertainty and price of ammo.
 

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Why? Because in my view, it quickly reaches a point of diminished returns. Unless of course if you are a bullseye shooter. I am definitely not any sort of gun gamer or exhibition shooter. I am simply a guy who wants to defend himself in a fight. I have never had any problem maintaining meaningful accuracy over the decades and I have never experienced any sort of difficulty or problem related to combat accuracy (torso zone).

I will acquaint myself with the trigger of a new gun by dry firing the thing 8 or 10 times... thats it. The rest of the time it will be during training of when necessary to disassembly a weapon, check or render it safe.

If it makes you feel good.. fine. I certainly wont try and talk anyone out of sitting around dry firing. At the same time I am simply not inclined to believe that it is likely making people better fighters. Some people have a need for a tactical kabuki dance and perhaps dry firing is it.

In my opinion, being reasonably acquainted with a trigger is a box to be checked and then move on. I accept that some people are going to do stuff for the sake of doing it. I aint mad at them.
 
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Why? Because in my view, it quickly reaches a point of diminished returns. Unless of course if you are a bullseye shooter. I am definitely not any sort of gun gamer or exhibition shooter. I am simply a guy who wants to defend himself in a fight. I have never had any problem maintaining meaningful accuracy over the decades and I have never experienced any sort of difficulty or problem related to combat accuracy (torso zone).

I will acquaint myself with the trigger of a new gun by dry firing the thing 8 or 10 times... thats it. The rest of the time it will be during training of when necessary to disassembly a weapon, check or render it safe.

If it makes you feel good.. fine. I certainly wont try and talk anyone out of sitting around dry firing. At the same time I am simply not inclined to believe that it is likely making people better fighters. Some people have a need for a tactical kabuki dance and perhaps dry firing is it.

In my opinion, being reasonably acquainted with a trigger is a box to be checked and then move on. I accept that some people are going to do stuff for the sake of doing it. I aint mad at them.
I dont understand how anyone can sit there and say practicing is bad, especially when it comes to a skill that involves life or death...but here we are.
 
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