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I’ve only been a handgun owner for six months and I have to say dry firing exercises have helped me a ton. I’ve used snap caps with my 9mm and just getting used to loading, racking the slide and clearing the occasional jam as a n00b made me feel much more comfortable when I finally went to the range to practice with live ammo. I’ve continued to do it and it’s paid off in quicker sighting.
 

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Few thoughts. People often misunderstand what ‘dry fire’ is. Yes trigger manipulation has its place, and it could be damaging if done in excess on pre-Gen 5 Glocks. But there is so much more to dryfire. The draw, transitions, reloads, and other manipulations can be perfected without ever pulling the trigger. It’s the bread and butter of all top level USPSA and Steel shooters. Ben Stoeger has some excellent books on the subject. If you’re talking practical shooting, this is where the majority of your gains will be made. No need for fancy laser cartridges or digital dart boards. Your eyes, sights, and focused attention are all you need.

As an anecdote from my experience, I joined GSSF and was hooked after the first march. First year I shot around 20,000 live rounds in practice. I barely squeaked my way into bottom feeder level master. Second year I should maybe 2 or 3,000 live rounds. All with a very specific purpose in exercises I was trying to improve on, and to diagnose any problems arising from poor dry practice habits. I easily dumped as much time into dry practice in that second year as I did live practice in the first year. Lo and behold, my scores improved exponentially.

How many good handgun shooters dedicate time to dry practice? Literally all of them.
 

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Dry firing is like masturbating to porn, and simulated driving games----something critical is missing. You are only practicing 1/2 or less of the "drill".

Yes you can dry fire all you want, but when your live ammo goes BANG, and your gun kicks, lo and behold, your trigger control, your mind, grip, and sight picture go to crap. So it can be incomplete and almost useless when in the real thing.
I think all the top competitors use dry fire to practice. Who am I to say they are wasting their time?
 

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Dryfire does not help in recoil mitigation. But, to be fair, it is very helpful in training the draw, trigger press, sight alignment, reloads, and clearances/manipulations!
I fully agree, it is a great way to train all aspects of shooting - except the BANG and recoil management.

I have a SureStrike laser ammo, and use it with dryfireonline.com. Makes dry fire more fun.

And I always warm up before I go to the range. Ammo and range time is expensive.

But I guess most gun owners are just not serious about firearms, have other interests and/or lack the discipline, motivation and persistence that training requires. So they stuck on the beginner level, and the gun goes into the drawer.
 

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I dry fire at least 30-45 minutes a night.
Wow. Then you must be an expert on this topic, so please end the controversy once and for all:

With the typical centerfire revolver or auto, does high-volume dry firing do anything worse than ordinary wear and tear and maybe wear out a cheap and easily-replaced firing pin?

I almost feel like this question is "What is the nature of God," for all the unending controversy it can inspire.

But seriously, what's the answer?
 

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Just throwing this out there. What would you folks considered excessive dry firing on a gen 5 glock? I've never really thought about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Like other's have pointed out, those who want to say dry firing is overrated are clearly missing the point here and I can guarantee they are not nearly as proficient with how they handle their weapons. Like I stated in the video, I rarely pull the trigger all the way so the risk of damage doesn't even cross my mind. I'm mainly honing in my confidence and comfortability with my weapons, my ability to draw and acquire my sight picture quickly, and reload smooth and quick. Luckily there has been more people agreeing that dry fire is critical in our training :dancing:
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Just throwing this out there. What would you folks considered excessive dry firing on a gen 5 glock? I've never really thought about it.
I know I'm not answering your question here but just find the wall of your trigger and stop there. It's not necessary to pull the trigger endlessly, although fun (highly doubt pulling the trigger as much as you would at the range would do any real damage). But, there's no real gain in skills by doing that. I wish they would have come up with a better term for dry firing since it encompasses everything but actually firing the weapon with a live round.
 

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There have been some Glocks that cracked the breech face by too much dry firing
Can you cite any specific accounts? I can’t see how dry fire can put any stress what so ever on the breech face. Please elaborate where you got that info from. Sorry but that statement makes no common sense.
 

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I do a lot of dry fire training and recommend it to my students. As an instructor, it seems that I spend more time at the range teaching and very little time shooting myself. For me it makes more sense to train when I can and then I am putting less ammo downrange.
 

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Si chiama memoria muscolare, questo tipo di esercizio, ottimo per me. Lo divido in fasi. Estrazione, inserimento caricatori, puntamento e fuoco. Ogni decimo di secondo è utile per chi pratica sport.
 

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Glock pistols designed by Gaston Glock , Austria
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I use a replica air pistol as my "dry fire" holstering, drawing , aiming tool , they make excellent replicas that have the look & feel of a real pistol, save wear and tear on my real gun

sometimes I also use snap caps, if you plan to do extensive dry fire use a snap cap, I wouldnt recommend dry firing and dropping slide on empty chambers on your carry gun.
 

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salva percussore.jpg
[QUOTE = "DienBienPhu, post: 29869842, member: 43146"] Uso una replica di una pistola ad aria compressa come strumento per fondere, disegnare e puntare a "fuoco secco", fanno repliche eccellenti che hanno l'aspetto e la sensazione di una vera pistola, salvo usura sulla mia vera pistola

a volte uso anche i cappucci a scatto, se prevedi di fare fuoco a secco estensivo usa un cappuccio a scatto, non consiglierei di sparare a secco e far cadere il vetrino sulle camere vuote della tua pistola da trasporto. [/ CITAZIONE]
 
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