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I'm a huge advocate for dry firing when ammo is short or hard to come by.

Something as simple as drawing and aiming at a post-it note on your wall will help you improve without needing to use live ammunition. I dry fire at least 30-45 minutes a night.
 

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I'm a huge advocate for dry firing when ammo is short or hard to come by.

Something as simple as drawing and aiming at a post-it note on your wall will help you improve without needing to use live ammunition. I dry fire at least 30-45 minutes a night.
Amen brother! I hate to admit it, but the first couple years I never did it and just went to the range to shoot. After just the first day of doing this I saw noticeable improvement in all aspects of drawing my handgun. It's invaluable to do this!
 

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Mr. Awesome
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Interesting you posted this. I just got done doing draws and dry fire. Since my health dipped, last year, I’ve been too fat to get my duty belt on (former LEO). I decided to see if I could squeeze into it. Gladly, I got it on, not pretty, but it was on.

It’s amazing how smooth my draw is, out of my multi-retention duty holster. I didn’t even have to work at it, today. Just think it and the G22 was out and in my hand. Of course, this comes from years of practice on the same system (I’ve had this setup since 2013).

Before most shifts, I didn’t walk out the door until I had three smooth draws, in a row. If things were slow, I would pull over and draw to the ditch. We had offices shared with one other Deputy. My office mate and I usually worked different shifts. No one cared if we went to the office and practiced draws or dry fire.

ETA: Make sure you remove live ammunition, before practicing.
 

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I have taken to working my draw from a boxing stance with hands up to replicate going to the gun when I can make distance in a fight. Get good there and you will be lightening fast when starting with hands around the navel.
 

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Check with the maker of your firearm to confirm dry-fire is approved for the make/model handgun you're using, and whether the maker recommends the use of snap caps, especially if you intend to indulge in what the gun maker may consider to be excessive dry-fire.

Dry-fire cycles still subject parts of a firearm to wear and tear. One gun company for which I'm an armorer finally started listing amounts of dry-fire cycles in their scheduled parts replacement recommendations (meaning live-fire numbers and dry-fire cycle numbers).

Obviously, maximum attention to safety rules is still required when handling an EMPTY firearm (and EMPTY magazine) for dry-fire and practicing drawing and presentation.
 

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I just attended a class were I was getting hooked up on my level III when drawing from the holster. Slow draws I was fine. The more I sped up, I would have this problem. So, like the comments above, practice all the fundamentals.
 

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MacGyver
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Dry firing is like masturbating to porn, and simulated driving games----something critical is missing. You are only practicing 1/2 or less of the "drill".

Yes you can dry fire all you want, but when your live ammo goes BANG, and your gun kicks, lo and behold, your trigger control, your mind, grip, and sight picture go to crap. So it can be incomplete and almost useless when in the real thing.
 

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MacGyver
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There have been some Glocks that cracked the breech face by too much dry firing
When guys think that their Glocks are indestructible, and dry fire 600 x a night thinking it is good and useful.
 

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I dry fire all the time , mostly when driving ,at stop lights. I pick out a imaginary terrorist point and click, get funny looks but so far have not had the cops stop me:horsey:
 
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I worry about the same round getting stripped out of the magazine and loaded into the chamber, even though I know the possibility is minuscule.
 

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Secret Squirrel
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....So it can be incomplete and almost useless when in the real thing.
Incomplete - yes. Useless - no. Dry firing is great for eliminating flinching or "anticipating" the "boom". It really works well for that especially for less experienced shooters. Just another way to enhance skills. Just another tool in the toolbox.
 

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Dry firing is a very good thing and should be part of everyone’s training regiment

if people say it shouldn’t be don’t listen to them they don’t know what they are talking about

I had two new shooters do a basic pistol course a few weeks ago

told them both to go home and dry fire

took them both to the range the other day to see how they progressed

the guy that did the work shot great

the other guy not so much
 
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