Who's your favorite GA aircraft manufacturer?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by JellyBelly, Jul 30, 2007.

  1. JellyBelly

    JellyBelly Meat Popsicle

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    I'm not a pilot, but I've been looking at Cessna's, Beechcraft's, and Piper's websites and based on cosmetics alone I really like the Cessnas.

    In the tradition of Ford vs Chevy vs Mopar, which aircraft manufacturer do you prefer?
     
  2. sourdough44

    sourdough44

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    I have always be partial to the low wing type. I used to own a Piper Cherokee 140 & have rented the 180's a fair amount. It may be just in my mind but I like them better when landing in a X-wind. I have also rented the C 152's & 172's a fair amount. I have the airplane idea in the back of my mind & it would be a 4 seat Piper if I was to take the plunge. There were some nice ones at Oshkosh.
     

  3. Beeg

    Beeg Guest

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    I've always been partial to Cessna's. Maybe cause I learned to fly in a 185 but also they are easier to get into on the ground and offer a much better view of the ground to enjoy. I also prefered them for crosswind landings as thier wingtips are further from the ground.
     
  4. ateamer

    ateamer NRA4EVR

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    I'm partial to Cessnas because they have doors on both sides, windows that can be opened in flight and have far better vents than Pipers.
     
  5. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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  6. New

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    MOONEY ALL THE WAY!
    Best bang for the buck, and the J models, heck, it blows the doors off most twins on 1/3 of the fuel consumption. Not to mention, they have never had an in flight structural failure, that I know of.
     
  7. heliguy

    heliguy

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    Low wing vs high wing is like the Glock vs 1911 wars....Fly both, pick the one you like to fly. I did my training in Piper Warrior 3's but rented a 172 several times.

    In the small things I like the piper. Low wing is a lot more 'sporty', turns are sharper and crisper, flaps are manual instead of electric (manual is better because you can see the flap position by the position of the handle).

    If your primary issue is visibility, absolutely can't beat a high wing. If I was sightseeing the mountains, high wing it is. But for every day fun, it's the low wing. I'd also rather sleep with a Glock than a 1911.....
     
  8. JellyBelly

    JellyBelly Meat Popsicle

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    Interesting.

    http://www.mooney.com/
     
  9. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    Until composite builders like Lancair, Glasair and Cirrus came along, Mooney was the unadulterated King of Speed. All Mooneys have retracts and the there are no exposed rivets on the forward aspect of the wing surfaces. Plus the cockpit has a smaller cross section than most comparable GA aircraft, all of which adds up to a sleek, slippery design. There are many hangar stories about GA pilots who are new to Mooneys getting violated because they failed to anticipate how fast it is when they start downhill and go blowing through an ATA at > 200 kts.
     
  10. New

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    I have some very big issues with all the composite airplanes out there. I believe some day they are going to end up with a black stripe along the leading edge like the Katana's ended up with.

    I was working at a high end FBO who had a SR22 on the line. It was the only plane I was not checked out in, out of preference. The school's manager kept on asking me when I was going to get checked out in it, so I did a little research on the plane and asked the "Certified Cirrus Repair Shop" about some if any real issues.
    I could not believe the issues with that plane. I mean, I have heard storys from other pilots, mainly the SR20 guys who bought them right up the first they came out, but my gosh. The plane had just over 400 hours, and it literally had three major structural "changes" since new.

    Some cracks where beginning to be found around the OAT probe, and in the service manual it states that particular area is a structural part of the plane, and NO cracks should be found. Well, after a month or so of detailed pictures being sent to the factory, they sent them some supplemental paper work to put in the POH and told them to forget about it. Then, they noticed a huge crack, right above the rear window. Guess what the factory told 'em to do about it. Oh yeah, and thats a structural part too. They had them sand the crack out until it was gone, and painted right over it, no filling no replacing composite, just paint. So now, there is a chunk sanded out that is about 1/2 inch deep and about an inch long! I used to joke to people that it was a "speed mod." Heres the clincher, from what was explained to me, all flight controls are a "fly by wire" system, so there are no cables attached to the control surfaces. They all have a servo, or electric motor moving them. Well, at about 200ish hours Cirrus sent them new servos to replace the old ones, they are better. I forget the time they had to replace them, I think it was something like ten hours. So they put these new servos on, and about a month later, they get new old style servos and a bulletin telling them to immediately replace them with the old style. A zero time compliance. I guess the way the servos are designed to work, is a oval off center cam, and it flexes to give the resistance. I guess they have a tendency to break, and you loose control of the plane. Kinda like what I think happened to the last Cirrus that slammed into the building in N.Y. There will be more to follow too. But I guess the Cirrus will be ok, after all, if the evidence burns up, who can really tell what exactly happened. I will never step foot in one of those planes, no thanks. It cements my idea of, why re-invent the wheel?
     
  11. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    +1

    That -- among other qualities -- is why the ONLY homebuilt I'd consider is a Van's.
     
  12. TKM

    TKM Shiny Member Lifetime Member

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    Just another ball of mud.
    Does Pazmany count?

    Ladislau Pazmany was a great guy, passed away about a year ago.

    He was famous for a 5/8ish version of the Storch and did a lot of great light aircraft and glider development and design.

    San Diego has a lot of GA greats, but Mr. Pazmany was only known to those who were "in the know". I still see the Curtiss and Ryan folks on a weekly basis but Mr. P was special.
     
  13. c6601a

    c6601a

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    Either you are an idiot or you hang around idiots; I suspect both. Cirrus is NOT "fly by wire" It is true that there are no cables going to the control surfaces, because there are torque tubes, just like in every Mooney since 1959 and several others.

    Looking through the ADs, there is AD 2001-25-03, that applies to a one-time inspection of the torque tubes for incorrect rivets. It has a 10 hour TIS requirement and was a grounding item if undersized rivets were found. Is that what you mis-read?

    As for a motor moving the control surfaces, it is part of the autopilot. Do you consider any airplane that has an autopilot to be "fly by wire?" Since I do not know the manufacturer of the autopilot, I could not research their ADs (they would be filed under the manufacturer, not Cirrus), so there may well be an AD for the servo motors as well.

    Frankly, if you are that clueless and that gullible that anyone can feed you a line of BS that you are willing to perpetuate (or you just make it up yourself), do your students a favor and turn in your CFI ticket. How many students have made fools of themselves and lost all credibility by repeating this line of BS in front of someone who actually knows the facts or can quickly check them up? What other rubbish have you fed them and what other crazy ideas have you instilled in their minds?

    Better yet, do the rest of us a favor and turn in all your certificates. A person that is that out of touch with reality ought not to be around airplanes, or guns for that matter.
     
  14. New

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    Well, I myself do not work on the planes, but I did take the word of the Tech who does work on the plane, and either HE explained it wrong to me, or I misunderstood what he was explaining about the control surfaces on the SR22. Wow, I guess I am human, and after you get over the whole structural integrity thing with the 20's and 22's, I guess that's a great plane :upeyes: .

    You are right, Sir. I will right away take all firearms all FAA ratings and my license to drive a motor vehicle as well and turn them in right away. I will attach a statement to all the agencies explaining how I have "lost touch with reality." I will explain that I have made a terrible mistake, and may have taken information from what I thought was a credible source and did not research it myself. My gosh, I hope they do not lock me up and toss the key, after all, I am human. But I guess that's just an excuse. As I know, you have never made such mistakes yourself, oh how I wish I could be just as s-m-a-r-t [email protected] you.
     
  15. Floodster

    Floodster Guest

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    Nah, you're just pretty ignorant on FBW systems. Anyone knows that FBW aircraft utilize hydraulic system pressure to move the flight control surfaces, be it rotor or fixed-wing. There is NO reason that ANY small general aviation aircraft needs FBW. FBW servos are hydraulic and VERY different from the autopilot electric/trimming servos (control motors).

    Ask yourself this... If you can waggle the control surfaces during a preflight and see the cockpit controls move... It ain't FBW. :upeyes:
     
  16. New

    New Guest

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    I usually don't pre-flight airplanes that I am not going to fly. Yes, I am uneducated on FBW systems, I have never flown an aircraft with a FBW system. I was simply taking information from someone who I though did not need a roll of T.P. to wipe his mouth after he was done talking. But yes, I did not research the airplane at all, I heard enough on the structural side of the plane for me to make my decision not to fly the plastic Cirrus.
     
  17. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    One Adam 12, One Adam 12, Thread Hijack in Progress, Code 1, see the man, dubya dubya dubya dot glocktalk dot com.
     
  18. c6601a

    c6601a

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    Your start by saying that you do not know much about the airplne, how your source is someone who needs TP after speaking, how you do not need to know about the airplane and then go on to talk about how the airplane has structural problems that only you seem to know about.

    No one is an expert about everything and does not need to be. No one is even knowledgible about everything and does not need to be. But everyone is responsible to know the limits of their knowledge. If you do not know, be quiet, rather than perpetuating BS. That was the point of my original post and I stand by it.

    Do you think you will ever get ANYcredibility or respect from anyone who has followed this thread? If you do this in real life and people catch on to you, do you think they will ever trust you? Do you think that the guy you gave a BFR to and told this story will come back next time? Why will he not tell everyone he knows to avoid you because "that CFI does not know what he is talking about"
     
  19. New

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    :laughabove:

    You are pretty funny. You know, I really do not care what people on this thread think of me and I am certainly not looking for credibility from a thread on the Internet.

    I know for a fact that the particular SR22 I have mentioned has had known structural issues, obviously not a big enough concern for the factory to be worried about, but you look around the OAT, you see cracks. You look in the back above the rear window (on the outside), you see a hole sanded out about an inch long and about a half inch deep.

    Yeah, as I said before I guess I WAS WRONG about the FBW. I never said that I was an "expert", just the little exposer that I have had with the Cirrus and bout how I came to the decision to NOT fly that airplane. If you would like to continue to persecute someone for something they are wrong about, you should mosey on over to the carry issues threads, you should find plenty to keep you busy.
     
  20. New

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    :laughabove:

    You are pretty funny. You know, I really do not care what people on this thread think of me and I am certainly not looking for credibility from a thread on the Internet.

    I know for a fact that the particular SR22 I have mentioned has had known structural issues, obviously not a big enough concern for the factory to be worried about, but you look around the OAT, you see cracks. You look in the back above the rear window (on the outside), you see a hole sanded out about an inch long and about a half inch deep.

    Yeah, as I said before I guess I WAS WRONG about the FBW. I never said that I was an "expert", just the little exposer that I have had with the Cirrus and bout how I came to the decision to NOT fly that airplane. If you would like to continue to persecute someone for something they are wrong about, you should mosey on over to the carry issues threads, you should find plenty to keep you busy.