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Who's running Linux, what distro are you running and why?

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by Getwild2, May 10, 2006.

  1. Getwild2

    Getwild2 Mac Aficionado

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    I've dabbled in Unix/Linux a little at work and I thought I'd do a little more dabbling at home. I'm debating on which Linux distro to feast on so I turn to you... Right now I'm leaning towards Ubuntu 5.10 but I'm also considering SuSE 10, Mandrive LE2005 and Fedora 5.

    Any suggestions and why?
     
  2. Dandapani

    Dandapani

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    Fedora Core 5 (I'm an old RedHat guy, starting with RH 7. I've run RH7, 8, 9, FC3, FC4, and now FC5, it just keeps getting better).

    http://fedora.redhat.com


    Edit: sorry, forgot to add usage. FC5 is my desktop. I've made servers out of the old RH line before. FC makes good use of my proprietary nVidia mobo onboard peripheral with no added drivers.
     

  3. grantglock

    grantglock /dev/null

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    Fedora 2 and 5, used for DNS, and mail server for ISP.
     
  4. David_G17

    David_G17 /\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

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    fedora 3 and 5, but people keep saying Ubuntu is the best for learning Linux.

    if you use Ubuntu, just keep in mind that when you google stuff, and it tells you to use the "su" command to become root, you're supposed to use "sudo <insert command>". that's the only thing that really ticked me off about it (i think you can just "sudo su", but i never tried).
     
  5. KG4IDA

    KG4IDA

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    I'm running Suess 9.1 on an P3-866 IBM just for fooling around with.
    And for when I can't stand gatesware anymore.
     
  6. metallic

    metallic

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    My personal favorite is Gentoo. I used Debian for a number of years and found myself customizing it so much that it hardly resembled Debian at all after a while. Custom kernel, custom compiled software, etc. So I eventually just switched over to an entirely source based distro to better suit my needs. The thing that I love the most about Gentoo, however, is the init system. No more sym-link hell to add new services. It's very simple yet very flexible.

    But at work, I spend almost all of my time developing on our cluster of servers running Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS. The primary reason for going with RHEL was for support and Red Hat's clustering software. If our primary webserver goes down, the other webserver in the cluster completely takes over in less than 10 seconds. The same goes for the cluster of database servers. Now the only things I have to worry about is our T1 going down and our direct attached storage dying.
     
  7. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    RH 9 on one server, Knoppix live CD server on a few other machines that require no permanent storage, FreeBSD on a personal web server.
     
  8. Dandapani

    Dandapani

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    i will frequently do:

    sudo ksh

    (or use whatever shell you want)
     
  9. Getwild2

    Getwild2 Mac Aficionado

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    I've been doing A LOT of research for the past couple of weeks and I believe I've come up with my first Linux Distro. Ubuntu. Now, a few days have passed and I think I'm addicted (see avatar). :supergrin: I now cant wait for Ubuntu 6.06 (Dapper Drake) to be released sometime in June.

    Anyway, I'm loving life as this is exactly what I wanted! In the past I've played around with RH and Unix a little, and I do get some Unix exposure at work, but just not enough. My goal is to work towards FreeBSD and Gentoo but I must start somewhere, this will definitely make a great learning platform.

    Thanks for your help and suggestions guys!!

    Funny but sad story:
    I was in college and I wanted to learn more about this "Unix" that everyone spoke of. Well I had to wait until the next semester, so I was content with my Novell Netware classes (this was around 1997). I sat next to this clean-cut, middle-aged gentleman in class, very nice fellow. I soon learned that he was my Novell instructors understudy. Over the next few weeks we worked closely as he had a difficult time understanding certain concepts so I offered much assistance.

    Well the semester drew to an end and I was finally able to take my Unix class. The first day I walk into class and who is the instructor? Yup, the Novell understudy. :laughabove: Oh and he remembered me too!! :supergrin: He remembered me to the likes of an A in the class although I only showed up 3 or 4 times, did zero assignments and took only one test! :laughabove:

    In the end this ended up hurting me as I learned nothing. Had I actually "attended" class, did the assignments and took tests, I would not be in the predicament I am in now. :supergrin:
     
  10. Specks

    Specks

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    I'm currently using Gentoo on my laptop at work. I also have gentoo installed on my home computer but rarely use it.

    I started with linux in Redhat 8 and 9. A co-worker get me started with Gentoo. It's definately not a distro for beginners, but I don't feel I'm a linux guru at all. I relied alot on the co-worker for help on getting things installed and set up. I'm pretty confortable with Gentoo now, but I don't do anything fancy or special. Most of my work is done on HPUX systems.

    I've been tempted to break out and give other distros a try, but I don't have the time to tinker around. My wife feels I'm on the computer too much as it is. :)
     
  11. Dandapani

    Dandapani

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    I am a Linux (Unix) Guru and could never get Gentoo to work on my laptop. I started with the minimal system and couldn't get it to emerge. At some point, the "emerge" command just disappeared. I gave up. Fedora (and Mandrake) had no trouble installing on the same laptop (older one). I used to run FreeBSD but got tired of the desktop experience being so far behind Linux.
     
  12. Specks

    Specks

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    Installing/reinstalling gentoo on my laptop is a couple of day process. The online documentation is very important to follow. Gentoo has recently released a graphical installer that I've used only once, unsuccesfully. It failed after one of the programs it was trying to install had a bad md5 checksum. The installer couldn't handle finding an updated source package. Hopefully it will be better after a few revisions.

    Another thing is you really have to know your system's hardware. When doing an install, I use a generic kernel build that is pretty bloated, but most if not all things will work. After I have gone through a basic install and have X and a window manager running, then I'll customize the kernel which usually takes several attempts to get everything right.

    I'll agree, Gentoo isn't the friendliest distro, but I just love the portage packaging system. If there is a program you want, chances are it's already in portage and all you have to do is emerge it. I really like it.
     
  13. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    I've had Gentoo on a couple of PC's.They were older and slower but to compile Mozilla from ports it took 5 hours.I tried installing OpenOffice from ports and I got a message that OpenOffice doesn't normally work from ports but I could try it anyway.The message was correct.I let it run for 12 hours and got nothing but errors.

    I'm using PC-BSD now.I like the package management of Debian and I like the speed of Slackware.PCLinuxOS is interesting.It doesn't have any server software/packages, but it's good desktop system for Linux beginners.
     
  14. Specks

    Specks

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    Yeah, I've never tried compiling OpenOffice. I heard it takes over 24 hours. For packages that take along time there is usually the package-bin version (pre compiled), ie. open-office-bin, mozilla-firefox-bin, mozilla-thunderbird-bin. There really is no need to compile these yourself unless you need the latest and greatest or are a developer/tester.
     
  15. Trsnrtr

    Trsnrtr

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    I'm using Suse 10.0 and before that 9.x. I've also used Ubuntu which was OK. For a live CD, I've used Mepis and Knoppix mainly.

    I've been wanting to get a laptop and set it up with Linux but haven't got around to it yet.

    Dennis
     
  16. neeko

    neeko

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    For just messing around with I've been using the security distros starting with whoppix, whax, auditor, troppix and now backtrack.

    Have a gentoo on one desktop and netbsd on another.

    slackware was my first linux distro and still my favorite.
     
  17. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    Whoppix was one of the best.Troppix got in to some trouble over some included software.Whax was Whoppix based on Slax instead of Knoppix.Auditor and Whax merged to become Backtrack which seems to be stuck in beta development and getting a bit outdated.You should give Helix a try.
     
  18. neeko

    neeko

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    I love troppix for its 'out of the box' support for the atheros chipset.

    backtrack just released a new beta few days ago, final release sometime the end of May, hopefully.

    is helix up to date?
     
  19. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    The current version of Helix is more up to date than those others.I think the kernel is 2.6.14.Same as the last Troppix.I like Troppix too.I prefered Whoppix to Whax.I think Backtrack is having some problems updating things.I did download the latest version but I haven't done much with it yet.
     
  20. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    Having seen the last few posts, let me pick some brains here. I am currently using server-off-CD based on knoppix distro for demos and classes, but will need in a foreseable future to build workstations-on-CD, and will be free to choose any distro. I don't need cutting edge. Stability and a good, easy selection of networking tools is important. Since time I can spend building this is somewhat limited, the user-friendliness (although assume I am not a newbie) is important, so I don't have to pull my hair looking for missing libraries all over the net.

    What distro would you recommend for a project like that? Should I stay with knoppix?