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I do. I had a stainless 2 3/4" Ruger speed six that I bobbed the hammer on and put in a set of Wolff springs and my brother did a trigeer job on it and I carried it with the standard skinny factory grips and a Tyler T-grip adapter and that gun was only a little larger than a newer Ruger SP-101 but held 6 rounds instead of five.
 

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Depends on the gun. If the rest of the gun is SMOOTH, yea... but if adjustable sights, safes, etc... no.

956728


Notice my S&W 2 inch 64 on the right... bobbed hammer and everything else slicked up so no snagging. And the Speed Six on the left... I do have a DAO factory Ruger hammer if I wanna do the same thing to it.
 

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Most if not all the centerfires, 627s, 327, 386, 686, 625s. 646, and 686 SSR I play games with are bobbed. It's been argued the reduced mass is conductive to good ignition of the primers. I run Federal and make sure they are well seated or reseated. Also run longer firing pins and not had any problems. My trigger pull is around 5 pounds with the cut down hammers, a little more than bobbed but along the same lines. For rimfires I leave them alone but have been tempted to try a couple of C&Ss hammers for rimfires.
 
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I do. I had a stainless 2 3/4" Ruger speed six that I bobbed the hammer on and put in a set of Wolff springs and my brother did a trigeer job on it and I carried it with the standard skinny factory grips and a Tyler T-grip adapter and that gun was only a little larger than a newer Ruger SP-101 but held 6 rounds instead of five.
Did you carry this firearm?
 

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For a concealed revolver, I only want DAO without a hammer spur. Anything with SA capability ought to have a hammer spur, in my mind.
Agree. Good on a pocket JFrame, or a DAO hammer auto. DA/SA? I want that spur just in case.
 
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I have some spurless hammer pistols because they came that way, but back when I was issued a 5903 I eventually replaced the standard spurred hammer with a spurless one (authorized, as an armorer) since I have enough flesh in the web of my hands to suffer hammer-bite on many pistols. I think I also installed one on a late production issued 4566TSW I briefly carried, for the same reason. That was back in the late 2000's, and memories fade.

I owned a factory spurless SP101DAO for many years, but the only bobbed/spurless revolver I presently own is a S&W 37DAO, which was part of a short overseas contract run (800 units?) that ended up being canceled and released on the commercial market. It was produced DAO, using a factory bobbed hammer on the older Airweight 37 frame.

 

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Yes, but not on a daily basis because I lived in Los Angeles at the time and couldn't get a carry permit because I was neither a politician or a celebrity.
Sooo, you do believe in modified weapons and in this case triggers?
 

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Sooo, you do believe in modified weapons and in this case triggers?
Yes, unless it's a Glock. The Glock factory trigger with a pull weight of around 4.5 pounds is the right balance between safety and ease of operation and messing with the trigger can cause all kinds of problems.

Ruger single actions are never as good as smith and Wessons right out of the box and need work to make them usable for DA only use and are never modified to pull weights lighter than 4.5 pounds otherwise you would have reliability problems with ignition. A DA revolver's pull weight can be as much as ten-eleven pounds and it doesn't hurt in terms of safety to dial that back a little. I've even put reduced power springs in my Airweight Smith and Wesson humpback bodyguard which is DA with a shrouded hammer and it is 100 per cent reliable. I rarely fire it single action but it has that capability.

I also see no need to modify the trigger to make a bobbed hammer gun DA only if you never fire it single action since it's so hard to halfway cock the hammer with the trigger and then catch it with your thumb to make a single action shot.
 

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I fully understand the reasons for doing it, speed of access etc, but to me they just look unfinished. When I see a photo of one my first thought is always.. "Where's the hammer spur..?".
Each to his/her/lizard creature/non-binary gender/Vulcan own I guess..
 
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Yes, unless it's a Glock. The Glock factory trigger with a pull weight of around 4.5 pounds is the right balance between safety and ease of operation and messing with the trigger can cause all kinds of problems.

Ruger single actions are never as good as smith and Wessons right out of the box and need work to make them usable for DA only use and are never modified to pull weights lighter than 4.5 pounds otherwise you would have reliability problems with ignition. A DA revolver's pull weight can be as much as ten-eleven pounds and it doesn't hurt in terms of safety to dial that back a little. I've even put reduced power springs in my Airweight Smith and Wesson humpback bodyguard which is DA with a shrouded hammer and it is 100 per cent reliable. I rarely fire it single action but it has that capability.

I also see no need to modify the trigger to make a bobbed hammer gun DA only if you never fire it single action since it's so hard to halfway cock the hammer with the trigger and then catch it with your thumb to make a single action shot.
Notions, opinions and beliefs. :)

I once had MagNaPort do their Duty Tune action package on one of my many Rugers. In that case, a Service-Six. (Yes, it was an approved modification for me to have done, in no small part because it was done by a recognized expert company in gunsmithing.) In my phone conversations with them they were firm in their conviction that the reduced power mainspring they installed was fine, and really needed to appreciate the full extent of the package, but when it comes to carry weapons I like to err on the conservative side of caution. ;) I immediately replaced the lighter spring with the factory spring when it returned. Very nice smooth and precise carry-up and trigger ... but now I didn't worry about the errant hard primer, or unexpectedly having the gun dropped into something that might impede the way the parts worked and the hammer's fall.

When I got my first Airweight rated for +P (original 642-1 rated that way), The head armorer at my agency talked me into trying some different rates of reduced power rebound slide springs (he didn't recommend reduced power mainsprings for carry weapons, and he's the one who had to approve any modifications done to issued and off-duty weapons).

The lightest of the rebound springs resulted in repeated failures of the trigger to recover (and the action had been inspected and nicely deburred by him). The middle spring occasionally produced some failures-to-recover, but not nearly so many. The heaviest of the reduced power rebound springs couldn't be made to result in any failures-to-recover at the bench, or out on the firing line. So, it was what I used for the next several months, as I was re-honing my DA revolver skills and burning through some cases of ammo.

Then, came the day out on the firing line, when I was running some hard and fast drills, that my finger outran the trigger's recovery. Repeatedly. All that range work had restored my DA revolver skills to the point where the heaviest of the lighter rebound springs simply didn't keep up with my trigger finger for as fast as I could stroke the DAO trigger. Hmmm. Back to the bench ... and back in went the stock (lt blue painted) rebound spring. Then, back out to the firing line and repeating all the fast drills.

Lo and behold, I could outrun the DAO trigger recovery, no matter how fast I tried. Then I realized that the trigger pull didn't feel any different in the pull weight. Guess all that trigger time and range work had made the lighter rebound spring a moot point, after all. :)

On a side note, the head armorer ended up installing one of the lighter rebound springs in his personal S&W Model 342 AirLite Ti .38+P, because he couldn't get it to fail-to-recovery when he was pulling the trigger in that particular gun. Now, whether the lighter powered rebound spring might offer enough less power to let that snub's trigger recover if/when the action got gummed up or contaminated? Hey, his gun, his call ... and his responsibility to shoulder in any adverse situations that might occur (since he'd been the one to approve it for himself :) ).

Now, notwithstanding the variable (and acceptable) range of trigger pull weight tolerances Glock has listed in their armorer manuals, for all the different connector, trigger spring and FP spring combinations, as approved ... the stock guns and their triggers are fine for "gov work". It often makes me chuckle how many shooters nowadays seem to be spoiled by lightweight trigger pulls in the 5-7lbs range. Sure, S&W revolver SA triggers could be great at 3 - 3 1/2lbs, but their much heavier DA/DAO triggers "built character" (and required a certain minum of hand/finger strength, especially while making accurate DA hits under stress :) ).
 

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A lot of S&W revolver enthusiasts probably never realized that the company had spurless hammers for all their spurred hammer revolvers. They just didn't typically list them in their parts lists, just like they didn't list all the over-size hands in the lists. Backroom parts available for special work requested and projects, so to speak.

Of course, back in the days of machined hammers, the number of such parts probably varied and wasn't great. Those were the days when machined hammers involved the use of 7 different hand-operated machines to make a hammer. Hell, I didn't learn that bit of trivia until I was taking a revolver armorer course and the instructor, the head of training at the time, was discussing some of the interesting bits of trivia he thought students might find interesting. :) Since he'd formerly worked at another gun company where he'd machined (and serialized) custom SA revolvers from billet stock, I listened to him.
 

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Yes, unless it's a Glock. The Glock factory trigger with a pull weight of around 4.5 pounds is the right balance between safety and ease of operation and messing with the trigger can cause all kinds of problems.

Ruger single actions are never as good as smith and Wessons right out of the box and need work to make them usable for DA only use and are never modified to pull weights lighter than 4.5 pounds otherwise you would have reliability problems with ignition. A DA revolver's pull weight can be as much as ten-eleven pounds and it doesn't hurt in terms of safety to dial that back a little. I've even put reduced power springs in my Airweight Smith and Wesson humpback bodyguard which is DA with a shrouded hammer and it is 100 per cent reliable. I rarely fire it single action but it has that capability.

I also see no need to modify the trigger to make a bobbed hammer gun DA only if you never fire it single action since it's so hard to halfway cock the hammer with the trigger and then catch it with your thumb to make a single action shot.

Lol, welp, whether it be a revolver or a Glock most need assistance and I appreciate around a 4.0# pull. I have yet to experience any factory piece that fills the need.
 

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I don’t like bobbed hammers. Or even “Commander” style hammers on autos.

I carried a Ruger SP101 for years and I have had a Taurus 85 Total Titanium for a long time. I’ve never had a problem carrying either of them with a regular spur hammer.

I like being able to cock the hammer and de-cock the hammer with ease and confidence.
 
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