Which version of Linux for a newb

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by DiverDn, May 3, 2007.

  1. DiverDn

    DiverDn Diver Down

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    With a lot of help from members of this board, I am building a new machine. I am going to put XP on it, but want to move my old machine to Linux.

    Which version would be best for me to install on a clean HD and for me to learn the ins and outs?

    Thanks
     
  2. ReyFufuRulesAll

    ReyFufuRulesAll Pantless Wonder

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  3. ReAX222

    ReAX222

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    I went with freeBSD and it's nice. I am dual booting, so I don't use linux often but it's alway there for when I want to play.

    If I could figure out how to get sound working and read my ntfs drives, I'd use it more.
     
  4. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    How old is the old machine?

    If it's not too old try Ubuntu 7.04.

    Download CD

    http://ftp.ussg.iu.edu/linux/ubuntu-releases/7.04/ubuntu-7.04-desktop-i386.iso

    This is also a live Linux CD as we;; as an install CD.
     
  5. DiverDn

    DiverDn Diver Down

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    How did this reply get ahead of my post since I started the theard?

    I've never had that happen before.

    did I reply to a different thread by mistake?
     
  6. DiverDn

    DiverDn Diver Down

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    It's about 7 years old, but I over built it when I put it together so I think it should be ok. 1gig ram, and a decent size intel processor.
     
  7. Blitzer

    Blitzer Cool Cat

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    KNOPPIX as it runs from the CD or DVD then it will go away as to allow you the use but not the hassle of multiple operating systems on your computer, during the evaluation.

    http://www.knoppix.org/

    Click on the American/British flag for English.

     
  8. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    I find Knoppix not great for hard drive installed systems.

    Another good modern Linux is Sabayon Linux. Get the 3.3 "Mini Edition" CD. The GVG version is huge and duplicates a lot of software.The CD doesn't take too long to download.It can run live from CD or be installed. Without 1 gig of RAM you can run just about anything Linux.As long as it's not too old for the hardware to be supported.I have a 7 year Pentium III that's going good but some newer Linux's won't install on it but most of the new ones will.

    Sabayon Linux CD download

    ftp://mirror.fpux.com/SabayonLinux-x86-3.3b.miniEdition.iso
     
  9. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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  10. dab

    dab

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    I'm running Debian Sarge on my Intel PII 333MHz laptop as I write this message. My "mainframe" is an AMD Sempron 1.6 GHz. I use my laptop as a remote keyboard/monitor to the bigger machine. With GNU/Linux a little CPU goes a _long_ way.

    I recommend Debain (knoppix/ubuntu) as with it you can operate a usable system with entirely _free_ software, yes Mr. Stallman free as in freedom, not as in free Beer ;). Redhat is another popular distribution with a wide support base but it arguably less "free."

    I advise you to avoid slackware and other such distros until you're comfortable with smashing your head against the wall. ;) Just kidding, you only have to smash your foot into the metal box to to get satisfaction...
     
  11. neeko

    neeko

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    Slackware 11, FTW!
     
  12. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    Thats the strangest thing I've ever seen...

    I'd go with Ubuntu, its always worked well for me. 1gig of Ram is plenty to run the normal gnome/kde desktops. Xubuntu isn't a bad choice at all though, if you really want something light. My laptop runs Gnome w/o issue, and 1.0ghz and 768mb of Ram...

    Its all gonna boil down to how hard your hardware is to configure though. If you can't get something to work, you'll likely move on.

    go over to http://distrowatch.org

    Most likely any distro in the top 10-12, will be OK.

    IGF
     
  13. grokdesigns

    grokdesigns

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    I use Kubuntu daily and find it very easy to use.
     
  14. STVA

    STVA

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    Being a nerd I can't let this slide. FreeBSD is different than GNU/Linux. They're similar, as BSD is unix, and linux is a unix clone, but they're not the same.
     
  15. Wingnut357

    Wingnut357 Killer Casual

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    Ubuntu, for sure. 7.04.

    I've got Xubuntu crammed into a p4 with 128 of pc133 ram.
    I'll switch back to Ubuntu once I get some more memory.
     
  16. DiverDn

    DiverDn Diver Down

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    It looks like I will go with Knoppix or ubuntu.

    Thanks for the help.
     
  17. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    Call it a “flavor,” not a version (it’s a *NIX thang).

    Ubuntu seems to be all the rage these days, principally because it’s perceived as being more “user friendly” than other flavors. That said, if your intent is to become “*NIX literate”, friendliest might not be what you’re looking for.

    Leenuks has come a very long way. Most installations are a snap – very “Windows-like” -- and most flavors are pretty accommodating of common hardware (drivers used to be a freakin’ nightmare).

    Right now I have a lovely Compaq Presario V2401CLwith 64-bit SUSE that runs rings around my 32-bit WinXP Sony Vaio VGN-SZ140. The only component not already working is the Bluetooth NIC, which I just haven’t gotten ‘round to addressing.

    It is truly amazing to simply plug in an SD card and see its contents pop up on the screen, just like Winblows autoplay function. No more of that “mount /dev/mmcblk0p1 /mnt” stuff.
     
  18. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    Knoppix is Debian based but isn't exactly Debian and since thelast released version of Knoppix Debian has gone through some major changes that if Knoppix is updated or even software added from Debian repositories it will break the system.

    Ubuntu is backed with more money than any other. The current release of Ubuntu is supported for 18 months.

    CentOS is based on the largest commercial Linux, Red Hat Linux. It may not be quite as user friendly but is very stable and has long term multi year support. It's becoming easier to use though and there is some but not all third party software available.
     
  19. GixxerSixxer

    GixxerSixxer Phil Deez Nutz

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    I'm using Ubuntu right now. I've dual booted my machine so that I can still use MS Money without having to run wine or VMware. I tried some of the Linux money management programs and preferred MS Money so I haven't left windows completely.

    I hear the latest version of Ubuntu is a bit unstable. Kubuntu has a number of issues. A guy at my work installed the latest Kubuntu and everything worked for 1 day then he lost his wireless and other stuff. I'm using Edgy right now without issues.

    I'm thinking of switching to Mint in the next few months. Mint will handle movies and other stuff without the licensing issues. Ubuntu can be modified to run the special licensing stuff but I've heard the Ubuntu is going to go to a pay service/support in the future. Mint is supposed to be a spin-off or Ubuntu that doesn't tiptoe through the proprietary stuff and will remain free.

    Mint is supposed to work fine with stuff from the Ubuntu updates, software. However, I'll need to play with it and see now that spring semester is over with I can play around with different OS's and not have to worry about losing data or having driver issues when I have a deadline.
     
  20. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    Kubuntu has more issues than Ubuntu. Mint is somewhere in between. The most stable version of Ubuntu is the LTS version but it runs very slow for me. I'm running Sabayon Linux right now. The most stable is the 3.3 mini edition CD not the DVD version. Software is easy to add it just takess a bit more time using Gentoo Ports with it.