close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Whats your most memorable camping trip?

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by XD9SW99, Jun 25, 2003.

  1. XD9SW99

    XD9SW99 OOoooo Allah

    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2003
    Location:
    Sector 0-0-1, Earth, North American
    Just what the title says. Describe your most memorable/favorite camping trip you've ever been on. Details, please. :)
     
  2. lomfs24

    lomfs24

    Messages:
    2,388
    Likes Received:
    144
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2003
    Location:
    Montana
    I would have to say that it was my first year elk hunting. I went with my dad and a couple friends. It can get cold here in Movember but we were camping in a canvas wall tent with a stove. The stove was a home made wood stove made from a 15 gallon barrel. It was pretty cold out that night. I believe it was about -10 degrees with about 3 1/2 feet of snow on the ground.

    One of the guys that was with us didn't quite understand the concept of pitch wood, or wood with a lot of pitch or tree sap in it. Normally you only use a couple of small pieces to get the fire going. Anyway, he threw several large pieces in and pretty much filled up that 15 gallon stove. In a few minutes the stove was litterally cherry red and the door on the stove was banging as it was trying to draw enough air to burn.

    The tent flaps were buttoned wide open, and we were in the tent playing cards with our tee shirts on and still sweating from the heat.

    WHAT A TRIP THAT WAS!!!

    BTW I still didn't kill and elk that year.

    This is just one of many but that one was probably the most memorable.
     

  3. mpol777

    mpol777 Feral Member

    Messages:
    1,680
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2001
    Location:
    Cochise County, AZ
    Mine was leading a group of my friends on the Barnhardt Trail in the Mazatzal Wilderness a few summers ago. This is just southwest of Rye, AZ.

    I learned that when leading people who don't have that much experience with hot summer hiking, do a gear check of everyone before you leave. I did tell people that to bring enough water for the 2 day hike, but I should have checked to make sure that they had enough.

    After about 12 miles in with about a 2300ft ascent, we pulled off the trail to head to a water tank.

    Problem!!! Water tank was dry. I mean dusty dry. I dug a little, but no joy.

    PROBLEM!!! Thinking that we were closing in on a water source the more inexperienced hikers drank almost all of their water.

    BIG PROBLEM!!! Even then some were starting to show signs of dehydration. No way they could walk out.

    So myself and another friend left what supplies they needed and took about a cup of water each for the walk out that night. Then we drove into town, picked up a bunch of water and ice and got back to the base of the mountain. The next morning we dumped all gear except necessities and gallons of water. Then 10 miles back in to meet up with the rest of the group. They were nice enough to get at least 2 miles closer for us. We got everyone back into shape and split up some of the gear to lighten their loads. Then 10 miles back out.

    Trust me when I tell you that 44 miles, in two days, up and down a mountain twice, carrying gallon jugs of water, in the desert, in JULY, SUCKS!!!!!

    Like I said. Unless I've hiked with you before and know you have your stuff together, I check gear. Although after that experience not as many of my friends want to hike with me anymore.
     
  4. paynter2

    paynter2 It ain't over Millennium Member

    Messages:
    6,653
    Likes Received:
    1,462
    Joined:
    Apr 25, 1999
    Location:
    upper mid-west
    I spent two whole weeks in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area. That was a long time ago - most of the camp sites and trails weren't marked back then. We had a map, but had to search for the trails...

    One of my uncles was an Eagle Scout leader from S. Wisconsin. Every other year he'd take his Eagles to the BWCA for a couple of weeks of camping and canoeing. When I was 14 they invited me to go along. Most of the ES's were older by a couple of years - they were kids who just graduated HS or were going to be seniors.

    Uncle Ed brought enough guys so we had 5 men for every two canoes. It helped much on the portages and allowed each man to ride for a part of the day - enjoy the trip. Great fishing and some of the most beautiful country that you can imagine.

    This was really wild country back then - very few visitors. It's still very remote - but you can see other travelers now. We went the full two weeks without seeing anyone but ourselves. We were over 100 miles out at one time. Occasionally we'd run into a little cabin on some island. Apparently, someone had built them before the National Forest Service or Park Service bought the land. The owner was usually forced to sell but could maintain the rights to the cabin until they died. I don't know if they flew in or canoed - but how cool would it be to have a little cabin on a remote lake 100 miles from the nearest person?

    As we came out, the last day... If someone was going in and asked me to join them, I would have turned around in a heartbeat.

    I've been back a couple of time since then. But, I wasn't 14 years old then - the trips weren't the same. Still fun and serene and beautiful and relaxing... But, I guess you can really only make a trip like that one time.
     
  5. tjpet

    tjpet

    Messages:
    3,284
    Likes Received:
    1,910
    Joined:
    May 14, 2001
    Location:
    Utah-Idaho border
    Backpacked in for a 4 day mule deer hunt one time. We knew the area fairly well and took just enough water for 1-2 days figuring we could refill at a few of the local seeps. Well, the seeps had gone dry and we were without a supply of water. Not that big a deal as it was October in a Rocky Mt. state and cool during daytime, cold at night. If absolutely necessary we could always hike a lot higher and get snow.

    One friend had brought in two #12 size cans of pears. Although the fruit was tasty the juice, once slightly chilled, was indescribably good. We rationed it out over the last 2 days of the hunt and it got us by. I'll never forget the taste of that cold pear juice. At that point in time it was better then three fingers of George Dickel on the rocks with a splash of soda.
     
  6. Big Time

    Big Time Senior User

    Messages:
    1,008
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2002
    Location:
    Columbus, Georgia
    Mine was with the boyscouts 30 years ago,when I was still living in Ohio our scout troop went out west to Utah to hike the last 50 miles of the Morman pioneer trail,That was great!!!
     
  7. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Moderator

    Messages:
    16,904
    Likes Received:
    2,678
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2001
    Location:
    North-Central USA
    Bright Star '85, near Cairo, Egypt.

    They told us we were camping on the beach, but the water's edge was 180 Kilometers north of us.
    We took their word for it.

    GP medium tents (dark green), in August, in the desert, without tent liners. Now I know what a ball-park frank in the broiler feels like. The next morning, you'd wake up just before dawn, INSIDE your sleeping bag, shivering, in what you thought was a damp-San-Francisco-winter-type cold; my thermometer said it was a balmy 76 degrees. I still think it was lying.

    I lost 22 pounds in 5 weeks, but was better off for it. Also got to see Cairo/Giza and the Pyramids on Uncle Sam's nickel. The best time was at the end when we were breaking the camp down; they put us up at a 4-star hotel in town for the last few days. Every morning I woke up and saw what you see in the picture below.

    A memorable trip.
     
  8. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Moderator

    Messages:
    16,904
    Likes Received:
    2,678
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2001
    Location:
    North-Central USA
    Sorry; the original picture was too large.
    Here's a cropped-down version:
     
  9. NDGlock

    NDGlock OIF2, KFOR12

    Messages:
    1,509
    Likes Received:
    13
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2001
    Location:
    North Dakota
    Bob Marshall Wildnerness Area - Montana

    God I do love the mountains and wide open spaces. No wonder they call Montana 'Big Sky Country'.

    DJ, great pic!
     
  10. Ghosty

    Ghosty Free American

    Messages:
    619
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2002
    Location:
    America
    My most memorable/favorite camping trip?

    Its a toss up.

    Went camping last summer. Knocked up my wife. I don't think my little buddle of joy is ever going to let me forget it happened. ;f

    Also, when I was a foolish teenager (not that long ago ;f ), me and some buddies where camping out in some woods my parents owned. Of course, we were all drunk as circus monkeys.

    We had all the beer in those stryofoam coolers, filled with melting ice.

    Next thing we know, somebody comes driving up the hill, assured to be somebody's parents. So my buddy gets a really bright idea on how to hide the beer.

    He picks up the styrofoam cooler and <i>throws it in the tent</i>.;P

    Anybody here ever try to get a nights rest in a sleeping bag soaked in ice water in 60 Degree weather? ;g
     
  11. pizzaaguy

    pizzaaguy

    Messages:
    2,717
    Likes Received:
    2,775
    Joined:
    May 8, 2002
    Location:
    Central Florida
    1. Our annual 2-day 60 mile canoe trip down the Delaware river.

    2. Compass course/10 mile hike thru Valley Forge.
     
  12. lomfs24

    lomfs24

    Messages:
    2,388
    Likes Received:
    144
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2003
    Location:
    Montana
    This reminds me of a kegger that happened here in Montana on the Missouri River North of Lewistown.

    For anyone who doesn't know what a kegger is, there is usually a keg of beer, hence the name kegger, or large quantities of beer in canned/bottled form and/or other alchohol, held in a not-nearly-remote-enough location for all teenagers involved. Large bonfires bording on forest fire size are frequent.

    Anyway, this kegger is going on by the river. And as you might expect at a function like this the local County Mounty (Sheriff) shows up. He was going to take the 9 cases of beer. Everyone told the Sheriff that he would probably take the beer and share it with his buddies(which is not an uncommon practice here) then they all agreed that they will dispose of the beer by throwing it in the river.

    As soon as the Sheriff leaves everyone jumps in their trucks and head down river. All beer was recovered except one six pack.
     
  13. Michigun

    Michigun Miss Michigan?

    Messages:
    3,707
    Likes Received:
    15
    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2001
    Location:
    Michigan, USA
    I was 18 years old, fresh out of high school & it was my 1st real Michigan deer hunt. My brother & a few of his friends let me tag along as they headed up North for the gun season opener. We camped out in the middle of some state land where we never saw another hunter all week long. There were 5 of us shoved into a 2 person camper topper... We had 2 feet of snow & I had my Remington 700ADL 30.06... the guys told me that they were going to set me up on some power lines before hand & that I would be able to shoot up to 500 yards one way & 800 yards the other. I practised for months beforhand & was comfertable taking a shot out to about 400 yards... long story short, I ended up taking my 1st buck ever at about 10 yards as it snuck up the wooded ridge in front of me. All that time & money practicing & I ended up "point shooting" it because of the rookie mistake of having my scope zoomed all the way up to max power! When I pulled up my gun & looked through the scope, I was seeing fleas & ticks on his coat!

    A little advice: You can always adjust your scope power up when you find your target at further distances, (They won't see you.) but you may not have any time or get busted trying to adjust your power down when your target is standing in front of you...

    A lot has changed sense then & we don't go North/camp anymore to hunt. We all got tiered of going, not seeing anything & then coming home to shoot our deer in our back yards. I miss the camping, beer drinking, card playing & hanging out with the guys however...
     
  14. KeyboardCowboy

    KeyboardCowboy Pull my finger

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Location:
    Minnesota
    This one time... at band camp....
     
  15. CanyonMan

    CanyonMan In The Saddle

    Messages:
    5,712
    Likes Received:
    26
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2002
    Simply put......

    "Every outing that I have ever had with my Dad, or with my Son." My Dad has been dead now for almost 20 years, but i still remember all the things we did together, and all the good times we had, and all the things i learned from him, from tying fishing line knots, to the time he saved both our bacon in a very severe storm that came up on a lake all of a sudden like, and us in a 12' john boat.

    With my Son... All the trips we've had together have had their own special laughs, fun, and misery, and i wouldn't take all the money in the world for any of them...!

    Man, the outback, and family is what it is all about.
    That is just a 'small part' of what the Lord has given to us.

    Go enjoy it!


    CanyonMan
     
  16. TJ in PA

    TJ in PA Mistaken ID

    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2003
    Location:
    USA
    Twenty plus years of it in the Army! Need I say more?
     
  17. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Moderator

    Messages:
    16,904
    Likes Received:
    2,678
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2001
    Location:
    North-Central USA
    In 1992 (or was it '93?), I was stationed in Alaska, living in Fairbanks. A couple of friends of mine decided we should do a river trip to scout for moose season. We rented a couple of Army canoes w/motors, filled them with stuff, and launched into the Chena river right downtown.

    Took the Chena to the confluence of the Tanana, headed downstream about 20 miles, and turned UP one of the smaller unnamed tributaries. Went a few miles upstream before a logjam blocked further progress, so we set up camp.

    Knocked around in the swampy tundra for a few hours looking for moose sign, cooked a good meal, told some lies around the campfire, and turned in. Went the rest of the way to Nenana the next day, where we had a buddy waiting to pull us out and truck home. Lots of wild country, good friends, good food; all-in-all, the perfect weekend trip.

    The attached pic is looking downstream from the spot on the tributary where we camped; it's one of my favorite photos of Alaska.
     
  18. Clyde in CO

    Clyde in CO LOL WUT?

    Messages:
    2,055
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2002
    Location:
    the Springs
    Boy Scout freezeree.

    Clear, cold night about 10 below, having to warm ice cream up by a heater so we could scoop it.
     
  19. Nowhere Man

    Nowhere Man

    Messages:
    980
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 22, 2003
    Location:
    North Port, FL
    Remote camping in the Nicolet National Forest. One campsite on your own lake in the middle of nowhere. Near us is a swamp full of frogs that must have been in the "mating" mood. Noisy as he@@. ---

    I finally fall asleep when my wife nudges me as says "I heard it, I heard it". I ask her what she heard. She says. "I heard them say
    Bud - Weis - Er". Spent the next two hours listening to FROGS!!!!

    Great trip, we all had a blast.
     
  20. Dogbite

    Dogbite DNT TREAD ON ME

    Messages:
    3,031
    Likes Received:
    73
    Joined:
    May 20, 2000
    Location:
    Tennessee
    When i was a kid,mom,dad and i stayed in the Alaskan wilderness for 3 solid months.We made a small spike camp--it was great.We were flown in by bush plane,with our supplies.I grew up in the Alaskan bush,but this was the longest stay at one time.I still look at the pictures with a smile..