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What's the secret?

Discussion in 'Food Forum' started by jawjaboy, Apr 3, 2006.

  1. jawjaboy

    jawjaboy Casual lead ho

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    What's the secret to getting pumpernickel(sp) bread dough to rise really well? mrs.jawja and I have have tried 3 times(in 3 day's) to make the bread. It is still remaining a little dense after cooking. HELP!
     
  2. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    I don't have a clue, but would you share your recipe? :supergrin:

    I have discovered that changes in air pressure and humidity effect my breads. Think that is a factor?
     

  3. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    It does several things (warm water, yeast, spoonful of sugar)

    If it foams it is alive and has started growing.

    Also you need regular flour in the mix to help it rise.

    Using some Gluten (in the baking isle) might help.

    You might let it rise three times , punch down twice bake on the third.
     
  4. noway

    noway

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    how about using baking soda?
     
  5. Garweh

    Garweh CLM

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    First of all: WEIGH EVERYTHING! Do not bake bread using volume measurements. Second: measure the water or liquid temperature with an instant read thermometer, ideally should be between 105 and 115 degrees. Third: proof the yeast as previously stated, be sure to let the yeast get a good head (as in beer) on it before you add the mixture to the recipe. Fourth: be sure to knead the dough as directed in the recipe, most doughs MUST be kneaded for 5 to 15 minutes or until "smooth and elastic". This is easiest to do in a mixer with a dough hook. Fifth: Allow to rise till doubled in size, covered with plastic wrap in a warm (~80-85 degrees) place. Sixth: Punch down with extreme prejudice! This redistributes the yeast and "reactivates" the yeast.

    This is how I treat most of my bread doughs in the restaurant where I am the "patissier" (pastry chef).
     
  6. VictorLouis

    VictorLouis

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    Some of the best pumps I've tried from the German deli are like short, squat, dark bricks. :clown: Slathered with mustard, and some favorite cheese or meat...good to go.

    Of course, if you're trying to make a true sandwhich loaf, that won't do.;)
     
  7. jawjaboy

    jawjaboy Casual lead ho

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    Thanks for all your responses. The yeast is getting foamy, water temp is good. We are using regular flour and rye flour, as per recipe. Have'nt tried gluten. I think our biggest killer is room temp. We have been trying this with the A/C set at our usual 73 degrees. We will try the bread again this weekend and I'll post the results. misskitty, give me a little time to get the recipe to you.
     
  8. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    in a slightly warm oven.

    Mine is electric so I turn it on and back off as soon as the elements heats up.

    This makes my yeast happy because it has a warm (not hot) draft free place to work.
     
  9. jawjaboy

    jawjaboy Casual lead ho

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    You read my mind lethal!! That was our plan!
     
  10. tavo

    tavo

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    Ditto on the weighing if you have a recipe that lays it out that way. One other thought: Are you scooping your flour right into the measuring cup, rather than spooning it in and then leveling it? That direct dig really packs it in, making for too much flour.

    I use the microwave to raise dough. Heat a cup of water in there for a bit and place the bowl in beside it. Warm, moist, no draft and you can preheat the oven at the same time.