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What's the difference between formatting FAT32 vs. NTFS

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by sjfrellc, Jul 16, 2006.

  1. sjfrellc

    sjfrellc CLM

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    I have a new 250mg Western Digital My Book essential drive. Reviewers have posted this comment about the drive:

    "If I had to find fault with the drive, I would like to see NTFS formatting from the factory, but FAT32 makes sense for most users and an NTFS reformat doesn't take that long."


    What are the advantages of either format?
     
  2. sjfrellc

    sjfrellc CLM

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    Never mind. I found the answer.

    This Western Digital drive is preformatted as a single FAT32 partition for compatibility with all Windows operating systems.
    The FAT32 file system has a maximun file size of 4 GB and cannot create partitions larger than 32 GB. Windows XP users can overcom these file size limits by reformatting the drive to NTFS using the Disk Management utility.


    So it only took a couple minutes to convert to the NTFS.
     

  3. HVAC-TEK

    HVAC-TEK

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    Also Fat file systems have no security features.

    NTFS supports encryption of data using the Windows EFS tool.
    Supports compression
    Supports the new "Dynamic disk" style of drive partitioning.

    Fat and Fat32 are both older Windows/Dos based File systems, but they are both still useful for many things.

    K
     
  4. fastvfr

    fastvfr Ancient Tech

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    The main difference is that Win95/98/SE/ME can't write to an NTFS drive.

    XP can write to both.

    I keep a 20GB FAT32 partition on my USB external HDD so I can run data off an old machine, add a larger HDD and format it and then run the data back onto the machine from my drive.

    Other than that, I never use FAT drives. NTFS is far more robust, IMHO.
     
  5. Brass Nazi

    Brass Nazi NO BRASS FOR U!

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    W2K can write to NFTS too. I am sure most of you know that. I am just staing it for those that do not know.
     
  6. Brass Nazi

    Brass Nazi NO BRASS FOR U!

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    fastvfr,

    I use a raid five setup at work. How does raid 0 work for you on your home PC?
     
  7. fastvfr

    fastvfr Ancient Tech

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    It works great!

    That's my gaming rig, and I loaded Windows and the game files to that.

    The other drive has data archived as well as a few different Linux distros installed.

    The RAID0 makes for quick boot times, and game startups aremuch faster since it helps prevent data bottlenecks from slowing in-game performance due to drive access times.

    If I had to do it again, though, it'd be a SATA-RAID. I happened to have a spare 120GB PATA WD on hand, so I just got another one and paired them when I reformatted.

    If you want to try it, let me suggest that you research the drive's MTBFR. Your butt is sort of hanging out (2x the chances of drive failure, statistically), so having a hot-swappable HDD on hand is never a bad idea.

    And backup, backup, backup. To an external HDD, of course. :supergrin: :rollsmiley: :supergrin: