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What's the deal with these dog rescue outfits and their crazy requirements?

Discussion in 'Woof Memorial Critter's Corner' started by KGBman, Mar 30, 2006.

  1. KGBman

    KGBman Not that KGB

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    Not all of them are crazy. I think a rescued dog ought to be placed carefully and get a great home. But I keep seeing these outfits that won't let you get one of their animals if you don't keep it in the house. I'm not talking about poodles or shnauzers, I'm talking about Golden Retrievers.

    I've had bigger dogs all my life and most of them did not want to be in the house. They'd come in and greet everyone and sniff around, but even when I tried to train them to sleep by my side of the bed, they'd get restless and want to be outside. It is obvious they preferred the back yard over the confines of the house.

    Some of the rescue operations even recommend crate training to keep the dog in the house while the people are at work all day. So being shut in a crate is supposed to be better for the dog than running in a big, fenced, secure back yard with grass, trees and other dogs to play with?

    I do not get it. :headscratch:
     
  2. sy2k

    sy2k

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    I feel your pain, KGBman.

    My girlfriend is adopting a Rhodesian Ridgeback puppy this weekend - age 9 weeks. We pleaded with them not to, but the Rescue went ahead and spayed the dog. We told them we'd spay her at a later age (like at least 6 months old) at our own expense, and offered to sign a contract to that effect, but...

    We had no intention whatsoever to breed her. They have their rules, but, to me, my concern was for the dog and her development.

    They've also become increasingly opinionated about every little aspect of how we're supposed to raise the dog. Everything from diet to how long she's crated to the stupid Gentle Leader and clicker training only, blah, blah, blah.

    We just want to get that pup away from the 'Rescue' now.

    Ridiculous. :burn:
     

  3. KGBman

    KGBman Not that KGB

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    Spayed at 9 weeks old!? Aw, come on, this is absurdity running amok! I thought they were supposed to care about the dogs.

    These have to be typical liberals who don't give any thought to the consequences of their folly, just whatever makes them feel good. We've wanted to rescue a Golden, but we're not playing these idiotic games. I've written to several of the rescue operations and told them as much, but they haven't got the time, inclination or intelligence to answer emails so far. Imagine my surprise.
     
  4. hangmans joke

    hangmans joke

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    agreed. i volunteer andwro kwith several shelters. alot fo them are way to hard and alot of times piss off intended folks who are there to adopt. but... i do agree with not leaving a dog outside ,and or chained up . its sad most of the adminstrators of these organizations are truly indeed nutjobs. i know from personal experience. i think the latest kicker for me was this one stipulation that they have vistation rights 4 times a year !!! thats total bs.

    hence thats why i now support less groups then i did. these folks are truly indeed liberal to the bone and do not see their actions as hurting the animals . but they try to do so much good it ends up hurting the animals.
     
  5. sy2k

    sy2k

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    Thought I'd update on the new puppy. She's healthy, confident and seems to have tolerated the surgery well and is recovering nicely. I wish it hadn't been done, but the pup will have a good home. It remains to be seen if there are any developmental problems...supposedly, the literature indicates that incontinence is a potential side-effect of early sterilization (doesn't seem to be an issue as the puppy sleeps >8 hours in her crate at night without issue), as is somewhat longer forelimbs.

    The liberal mind-set is to not trust anyone's judgement in making decisions for themselves. Hence, the restriction of personal freedoms and the increase in governance. Unfortunately, it is infecting everything, including pet ownership.

    Religion, Politics and Dog Training. Not fit for polite conversation! :soap:
     
  6. hman

    hman

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    In all honesty if you saw the problems through the eyes of the rescues maybe you would be more understanding.

    If everyday you had to go and see litters of animals that no one will ever care for. Old dogs that are matted malnourished abused or sick beyond repair, maybe then you would understand. These rescues take on a more active approach to placement. While I don't always agree with their methods or tactics they can do a much better job at making sure the animal is going to a good home.
     
  7. Akita

    Akita gone

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    There's all kinds of people in any 'profession'. Some nutty and some pretty sharp. I wouldnt want their job for any amount of money- and most of them do it for free.

    That said, I remember 1 group that was about to adopt out an adult cat until they found out that it was gonna be a mouser in a barn (country home, 200+ acres, etc). They allowed the cat to be PTS rather than let the family have it. The family had agreed to pay for neutering before pickup and treat it as a pet and everything- it was just going to be primarliy an outdoor cat(it had all its claws)- and these idiots thought it better to kill the animal.
     
  8. obxemt

    obxemt Chaplain of CT

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    I don't have any issues with "inside-only" requirements because I personally don't see the point in having a dog if it lives out back. That being said, I gave up on trying to deal with wacky wingnut rescue groups. I totally understand that they want good, stable and permanant homes for their foster dogs, but it's easier to adopt a child from Vietnam!

    I filled out two multi-page applications that wanted everything except a blood sample, before they would even talk to me. One was ignored; the other one met us then treated my wife and I like we were second graders.

    However, there's another rescue group locally that I have a ton of respect for. I'm trying to convince my wife to let me get a dog from them tomorrow. I actually think their requirements are a little lax and it seems like they'll adopt to anyone, but I'll deal with them or a government animal shelter before I fill out another application.
     
  9. obxemt

    obxemt Chaplain of CT

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    ...however the nutty-to-normal ratio is disproportionately skewed against rescue randy. :supergrin:
     
  10. eleckster

    eleckster

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    I just went through the adoption process. Most adoption organizations are goofy, have to live inside, why? I grew up on a farm and the dog preferred to be outside, except at dinnertime. It is hard to get my newly adopted border collie inside when I am at the farm. The closer to the big city the more liberal the people are. These people get all the financial support they need and can keep an animal indefinitely if adopters do not meat their far out expectations. I agree with the poster who said it is eaiser to adopt a child. Home visit for a dog, what the…………… These people need a dose of reality. I remember the economics lesson as a child of the cost of the vet, verses the cost of a calf. I went to a rural kennel and they were happy to let me leave with a dog, it saved them from using a Glock. I gota go chase my dog inside for the night.
     
  11. KGBman

    KGBman Not that KGB

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    Sorry, I do not agree. I have seen animals like this and I greatly appreciate compassionate responses that are also well informed responses. The rescue outfits that won't let me take a dog home are idiotic. They graded me down for having mine in a yard that my dogs obviously prefer over being in the house. They would not have graded me down if I told them the dog would be staying in a crate 9-10 hours a day while the family is at work. That's just stupid - no other word for it.

    All of the Golden Retrievers I have owned have strongly preferred being outside. I wanted them in the house, but they constantly went to the door and indicated they wanted out - not to relieve themselves, but just to run in the grass and lay under a tree in the breeze, the way God intended them to be. As for why anyone would want a dog if they were going to live out back - we still spend a lot of time together - but I don't have to shut them in the house to do that. We spend time together where they'd rather be instead of where some liberal wingnut thinks they should be.

    I'd stack any of my goldens up against any of those kept in a house and mine would come out on top in health, contenment and longevity. I guarantee it. The arrogant folly of these rescue operations is not understandable. To shut a large breed dog in a crate for one third of every day (or longer) is not compassionate and it is in no way preferrable to letting them run in a big, secure yard.

    sy2k - glad your pup is recovering from the abuse these loonies put her through. Hope you will enjoy a long relationship with her.
     
  12. Rad Dog

    Rad Dog

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    Liberal? Sounds to me like you are complaining about Free Enterprise at work. If you and your gf didn't like the terms and conditions specified by the rescue organization, you were free to get a dog elsewhere. Why didn't you do that?

    The motive of most rescue groups is not to place "liberal" lifestyle restrictions on adopters, but rather the Best Interests of the Dog. You are free to disagree with their policies, and you may occasionally be right. But these are people who know the breed, and in the vast majority of instances their guidelines that seem so arbitrary to you are appropriate and right.

    By definition, "rescue" groups have saved the dog from some bad situation, and they are doing their best to make sure that the dog does not end up in a bad situation again. They are usually quite good at that. I salute them and all of their terms, conditions and rules.:patriot:
     
  13. eleckster

    eleckster

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    The rescue agencies are not funded solely, or even in large part, by their business activities. I do not think that having no need to turn a profit is “free enterprise”. Do you think the rules would be different if they had to get buy on the cash provided by the placement of animals?

    So you salute the spaying of a 9 week old puppy?
     
  14. Rad Dog

    Rad Dog

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    The part that definitely was free enterprise was when the adopters chose to pay the fee and adopt the dog when they didn't like the terms and conditions of the adoption. They should have taken their money elsewhere if they didn't like the terms. Why didn't they???

    I can't speak re this particular instance, but my breed club runs a breed rescue, and the reason at least half of the adopters want resue dogs is because they don't want to pay the much higher price associated with buying a puppy from a reputable breeder. So these people want to get a particular breed on the cheap, and then don't want to honor the terms that are part of such a transaction.

    On the other hand, many adopters are taking a rescue dog out of the goodness of their hearts. They are usually far more willing to honor the terms of the adoption agreement into which they voluntarily entered.

    I'm not a vet, and can't say what is the minimum safe age to spay any particular breed. Sounds like it worked out fine in this case. What I can tell you is that in our rescue program, NO dog is placed, until AFTER it has been spayed or neutered while sill in the custody of rescue. If a puppy were deemed too young to safely spay or neuter, it would be kept in rescue until it is old enough.