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what would you eat if you had to grow it?

Discussion in 'Survival/Preparedness Forum' started by RWBlue, Mar 16, 2008.

  1. RWBlue

    RWBlue Mr. CISSP, CISA CLM

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    Pulled from another thread, but worth it’s own thread.

    mitchshrader “what would you eat if you had to grow it?”

    I am working on my answer, but don't have a complete picture, yet.
     
  2. boarsblood

    boarsblood

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    Corn, soybeans, tomatoes, peppers, pumpkins, etc.
     

  3. Nakkie

    Nakkie CLM

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    Corn, taters, soybeans, fava beans, green beans, peas, beets, summer and winter squashes, truck crops like the leafy vegetables and herbs. Also an oilseed crop like flax or canola.
     
  4. justcor

    justcor

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    Why Solyent Green of course. :supergrin:
    [​IMG]
     
  5. RWBlue

    RWBlue Mr. CISSP, CISA CLM

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    One more thing, how much property would it take?
     
  6. BigFatDog

    BigFatDog

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    Corn, beans, beets, carrots, kale, spinach, broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, tomatoes, strawberries, apples, pears, brambles, peppers, squash...

    Am I the only guy on here who subscribes to Backyard Poultry? :)

    http://www.backyardpoultrymag.com/

    ETA: Well if stuck in my city house... I'd leave out the brambles & asparagus. I've already got the apples, pears & herbs in my kitchen garden. We do kale in front beds in the winter now. The rest of the raised beds, currently housing roses, azaleas and hedge plantings would be converted to foods stuff. Except for the old english climbing roses. I'll still keep those for jelly. I'd be using that square foot method that you dislike RWBlue. I would estimate around 1500+ square feet. I'd likely replace the back grass with 3 sisters plantings for even more production. That's corn. beans & squash btw. Grown together on the same mound.
     
  7. Nakkie

    Nakkie CLM

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    Do you mean to totally feed one person for a year on a diet of things you grow yourself?
     
  8. RWBlue

    RWBlue Mr. CISSP, CISA CLM

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    I didn't think the question through, but that is a good definition.



    As far as the square foot method, I disagree with certain parts. I think certain parts will only work while we have society.
     
  9. Nakkie

    Nakkie CLM

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    Are you talking about the part where you get to harvest the produce you grew before everyone else helps themselves? :supergrin:

    PS - I think about 1750 s.f. (700 linear feet of 30" spaced rows) in corn will roughly support one person for a year.
     
  10. Peak_Oil

    Peak_Oil

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    That's my big survival prep, growing and raising all the food I need/want for myself and family, year after year. I'm just getting started with a little container gardening in the city to learn something before we move to the sticks.

    So far, I've got essentially a spice garden, an orange tree, and a dozen strawberry plants.

    Eventually, I want to buy my beans and rice, and grow the peppers, tomatoes, onions, garlic, lettuce, rosemary, thyme, and a million other things. I'm really excited about it and looking forward to it.
     
  11. RWBlue

    RWBlue Mr. CISSP, CISA CLM

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    Lets say you crucify the first person, and everyone decides to stay away.
     
  12. Akita

    Akita gone

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    /////
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2008
  13. Nakkie

    Nakkie CLM

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    Don't let the scarecrow drip on the garden. Just a health concern.
     
  14. Grayson

    Grayson

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    I like taters, and carrots, and cucumbers...squash...I don't like raw onion, but like it cooked with stuff...

    My mamaw grew a few cukes in a hanging flowerpot a while back, hadn't seen that before. She used to have a BIG garden, but at 90, she just don't have the get up and go anymore (at least PHYSICALLY).

    Wish I could go back in time and pop my younger self on the head and tell me to get in there with her and LEARN it...

    I think I'll be helping my cousin garden this year. Short of me patrolling with my 870 and those S&B rubber buckshot I got, any good ideas to keep the deer out?
     
  15. BlackhawkFan

    BlackhawkFan

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    Whatever I can grow indoors. Tomatoes, Serranos, Garlic, Onions, Green Beans, Okra.... Stockpiling carbs, Pintos, Dried Peas.

    Won't cultivate any part of my acre because doing so will draw attention to myself. Also, having an outdoor garden means I'd have to cage the garden to keep out the birds and rabbits.

    I like the idea of growing flax, but I suspect it takes a lot of land.
     
  16. glockawakka

    glockawakka

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    Dandelions. You get a nice mix of everthing in them. flowers, greens, roots and seed. easy to grow, hardy, grow just about anywhere, and fast too.

    Tomatoes and variety of hot and sweet peppers, onions (probably scallion or ramps), berries,

    Wish I could grow kelp but thats a pipe dream. I could harvest seaweeds but never done it so I wouldn't put too much stock in it.
     
  17. Ronnoc

    Ronnoc

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    Mostly what I do now, tomatoes, peppers, herbs, cucumbers, squash, zuchinni, potatoes, lettuce, grapes, peaches, plums. If I can get my garden to work right, cabbage, onions, eggplant. Radishes seem to work well. I have blackberrries, but they are not good producers.

    I have plenty of acorns, those things are everywhere.
     
  18. sniper4x4

    sniper4x4

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    every year we have the following

    onions
    russet taters
    sweet taters
    green beans
    tomatoes
    carrots
    celery
    rubarb
    okra
    cucumbers
    bell peppers
    banana peppers
    jalapeno
    sunflowers

    Im sure there is more that I am forgetting.
     
  19. Mikeyboy

    Mikeyboy

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    I grow Almonds, Tomatos, Cucumbers, Snap Peas, jalapeno and bell peppers, pumpkins, and I'm trying corn this year. I really like sunflower, but so do all the critters in the neighborhood.

    Also I'm going to buy two apple trees to go with my Almond trees. Home Depot are selling Dwarf apple, cherry and peach trees for only $20 a pop. Just make sure you read up if you need pollinators or not. Apples you do, that is why I'm getting a pair.
     
  20. GlockSupremacy

    GlockSupremacy Recycle Kids!

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    then we make him food too! taste better than corn, that for sure!