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What is dry sherry?

Discussion in 'Food Forum' started by Chevytuff19, Aug 2, 2004.

  1. Chevytuff19

    Chevytuff19

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    I was trying to make some Japanese clear soup and the recipe called for "dry sherry". I think it is a type of wine, but is that what it is actually called at the liquor store or is there a certain brand I should get or what?

    Or if someone has a recipe for the soup that doesn't require dry sherry, that would be good too.

    Thanks,
    Wes
     
  2. noway

    noway

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    dry is normally a term used in wines to establish it has no sugar or very little ( i.e full dry,etra dry , etc...... )

    Now instead of going to a liquor which most likely would not have a very good selection of dry sherry goto a fine gourment food/wine shop and head over to the cooking wines sections. Most liquor store that would carry sherry would carry a sweet sherry if it is for human consumption.

    hope this helps.
     

  3. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    I have always heard that you should only cook with wines you would drink. Is dry sherry an exception?
     
  4. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    Not IMO.

    Sherry is a fortified wine that originated in Jerez, Spain. Sherry is the anglicized form of Jerez. It was the wine in Poe’s chillingly macabre “Cask of Amontillado”. Curious that a Japanese recipe should call for it.

    Dry, pale sherrys (I’m presuming a pale wine is better suited to a clear soup) are called ‘Fino’. IMO, the best value in a Fino is the Elegante brand. Gonzalez Byass and Tio Pepe also are excellent brands but are pricier than Elegante.

    You can usually find a half liter bottle of decent Fino for about $10.
     
  5. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    Ok. I know very, very little about wines. I am debating on enrolling in a wine tasting class at the college next semester. I have began exploring our local vineyards as they are cropping up everywhere. For the most part, I like sweet reds and the others I haven't decided on yet ;g :)
     
  6. General Sherman

    General Sherman

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    Never cook with "cooking sherry".

    It is not sold as sherry for comsumption because it has so much added salt.
    It will alter your food.

    It is correct that you should cook only with what is suitable for drinking. Usually it is called for to add sweetness to the final food. I can and do usually substitute a sweet or flavorful wine such as chardonnay. If you use red wines it will turn your food red so I usually use a white wine.

    Yes the above description of the origins of true sherry from Spain is correct. The English are great sherry fans and own several of the famous houses.

    Port is a similar fortified product from Portugal.
    Madiera is another similar product from the Island of Madiera near the Canary Islands. Good stuff. Been there, tasted it. My favorite is "Rainwater Madiera".
     
  7. Ned Ludd

    Ned Ludd

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    Most likely the recipe was “Americanized” to substitute the more common (in America) “dry sherry” for sake. The Japanese commonly use sake in soup and mirin (sweetened sake) in sauces. If it were me I’d use sake and forget the fact is says sherry in the recipe. If the recipe uses a fish stock base, I'd use sake for sure.

    -NL