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What dies to use for .223 in a progressive press?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by cysoto, Apr 13, 2014.

  1. cysoto

    cysoto Gone Shooting!

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    What die set do you guys use for .223 Rem reloading in a progressive press? I'll be using mixed brass and shooting this ammo in a carbine class where we won't be shooting past 75 yards so I don't need the resulting ammo to be super-accurate but it does need to feed very consistently.
     
  2. CarryTexas

    CarryTexas

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    I use the RCBS X-Die. Follow initial sizing & trimming it allows you to reload without trimming.

    I use Hornady dies for bullet seating due to the alignment sleeve.
     

  3. Hoser

    Hoser Ninja

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    Dillon carbide resize and Redding seat and body die.
     
  4. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    I guess I'll ask... Which 'progressive' press?

    If you are running a 650, for example, you can probably afford the Dillon power trimmer and a separate toolhead. So, you size and trim in one pass (about 1400 cases per hour) and reload with a different toolhead (about 800 rounds per hour).

    OTOH, there are less expensive ways to do the trim operation but they are MUCH slower. I have the RCBS X die but I haven't used it. Even with that die, you still need some way to trim the brass after the first sizing. Since you only need to do it once, a slower method will be fine.

    Richard
     
  5. Taterhead

    Taterhead Counting Beans

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    I have RCBS dies, including the X Die. To use the X feature, you must initially trim to 1.74". Then you use the X mandrel to keep the brass from growing. The issue I have with it is that you need to have some way of knowing what has been trimmed in that manner before you use the X feature otherwise you can buckle the shoulder. My range has a lot of 223 pickups, so I am always getting brass that's not mine in with the lot.


    I've tried coloring the case head with a sharpie, but that gets tedious. In the end, I've just stopped trying to deal with the X feature.


    I am looking at the RCBS competition seater die to replace the regular seating die that I use. They have a new one with a bushing like Redding dies. I like how it has that window thingy for placing bullets. 55 gr .224 bullets are small.
     
  6. dkf

    dkf

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    I use the SB X die for sizing. The decapper on it is frail though. The RCBS seater die that comes with the set sucks IMO so I use a Lee.
     
  7. RustyFN

    RustyFN

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    I use the Lee pacesetter die set for 223 on my progressive.
     
  8. steve1911

    steve1911

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    I use the Dillon carbide dies.




    1911club#410
     
  9. CarryTexas

    CarryTexas

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    I just sit in front of the TV and mark them by drawing a ring around the primer. When I come home from the range I just sort them. Not a problem for me.
     
  10. Taterhead

    Taterhead Counting Beans

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    Funny. I did about 500 like that recently. Shot a bunch of them at the range. Found a nice haul of range pickups then absent-mindedly put them in the tumbler together. Sharpie worn off, and back to square 1.
     
  11. PCJim

    PCJim Senior Member

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    Lee dies.


    For marking purposes to keep from having to prep brass that I had previously prepped, I lay the loaded ammo out on the bench and drag a Sharpie across the bottoms. Single line is enough to let me know what brass is mine. I also try to remember to use the UTG brass catcher. When I remember it, there is no confusion as to what brass was mine.
     
  12. fredj338

    fredj338

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    I am using the RCBS 'X' dies in my 550B. I like only having to trim once. I shoot my ammo in 3 diff AR, all are GTG.
     
  13. dkf

    dkf

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    I use the Caldwell catcher on my AR. It works well on the bench but is kind of a pain when moving and shooting. Picking up brass is a pain.

    I don't do it on my brass but I suppose you could take a triangular needle file and make a small mark on the back side of the rim to designate already trimmed brass. The mark will not come off in the tumbler.
     
  14. kostnerave

    kostnerave

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    I use Lee carbide dies on all my rifle reloads. The money you save spend on a Possum Hollow Kwik case trimmer. A great tool for the price.
     
  15. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Too much work. I just Sharpie the case heads. If I find any non marked brass, it goes in the unprocessed bin.
     
  16. cheygriz

    cheygriz Venerable Elder

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    I wasn't satisfied with the Dillon dies in .223 so I switched to Redding Pro dies. Big improvement.