What cars of today will be “classics” in the future?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Rizzo, Aug 1, 2020.

  1. BarryR

    BarryR

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    Nothing...these kids today, some don't even want to drive RRRRRR what? If they do they want a Kia or something stupid like that. Most kids are at home sleeping or playing video games.
     
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  2. jmohme

    jmohme

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    Back in the day of the Model T, nobody thought those mass produced rolling death traps would ever be collectable either.
     
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  3. jmohme

    jmohme

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    laughing-pointing-emoji-11549891819px76kliytz.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2020
  4. M&P15T

    M&P15T All Hail King Kona

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    If we're talking cars of today, like 2020s, it's going to be a mess.

    The number of computers and sub-computers, little sensors and such, are all throughout cars. In the engine bay, under/in the dash, console, seats, trunk areas, everywhere.

    Mess with one of those things, and the others get angry.

    Then there's the air-bags.
     
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  5. Jonesee

    Jonesee

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    Do you think the Grand Marquis has the same cachet and historical significance as the Model T?

    Look at the current used market for the Grand Marquis. Then look at the collectors auctions markets and see how the Marquis is faring there. (they aren't).

    The Marauder is the model that has retained market value and has a desirability in the collection market.

    If you believe they will be collectable and their market prices will increase, their price is right. You should be buying. I wish you luck.
     
  6. jmohme

    jmohme

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    You do know this is the internet, right?
    Don't take things you read here so seriously.

    No I do not think that Grand Marquis is ever going to be collectable and even if I did, I would not go out looking to buy one.

    All I was saying, is it is sometimes it is a total surprise as to what becomes collectable.
    Many Model T's ended up rotting away under the old oak tree or in a barn somewhere, instead of being preserved for their historical significance or future collectors value. No different than an old plow that was no longer needed.

    A good example is something closer to home on this forum or older Glocks.
    Yes, the original G17 is a historically significant firearm and I won't criticize those that seek them out, but to me, it is just another Glock.

    I collect old toy steam engines. If you saw some of them, you whorl probably wonder why I have that old junk laying around.

    What becomes a classic is about 90% perception the owners
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2020
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  7. dbuck47

    dbuck47

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    I think you have to separate the exotics and high end domestics from the rest of the more plebeian but still interesting cars. The super elite Ferraris, Bugattis, etc will mostly be high $ items, but since they start in such rarified air to start with, it will be a long time and shorter return on investment. The Ford GT has and I think will continue to do well. The run of the mill Production Ferrari, Lamborghini, ( if you can call them that) will depreciate slowly and it might be 30-40 years before they are worth more than new.

    The 308/328 has only in the last few years become worth more than new, and isn’t much now adjusted for inflation. But in $ they are approaching and passing the 360 and 430 as those continue to gently depreciate. The modern Ferrari, like all modern cars are dependent on electronics that are supported for a limited time, after which restoration will be expensive even relative to that stratosphere.

    A properly restored Ferrari 250GT SWB is worth several brand new Bugattis, and a 250 GTO is worth several SWB’s. I don’t think there are any 250 GT‘s or GTO’s being made today.

    With the upper end muscle cars of today, it’s hard to say. A Hemi ‘Cuda or Shelby GT500 from 69-70 were probably only 25-30% more than a we’ll equipped GT or Mach I. Today’s top end versions are roughly double the regular model. I think in 25 years a pristine Hellcat or Modern GT500 that’s been driven just enough will bring a premium; normal mileage cars will just be used cars. They might sell for more than new, but not adjusted for inflation. All cars face the same issue; try to fix a Dell 360.
     
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  8. DukeNukem

    DukeNukem

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    It seems all trucks and suv’s have some sort of cult market following.
    I have always sort of wanted a marauder or v8 Tbird. Not as bad as I have always wanted a 1997 anniversary edition firebird with t tops and a stick. I have lusted after one of those since the auto show I saw one at when I was about 16. It’s hard to believe to me that the old Ltd and caprice wagons have become a thing. Or vans. But they have. So you never know what plebeian, boring ride of today is the one to park in the barn under a tarp.
     
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