What bow for a noob...

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by glock 19z, Nov 10, 2005.

  1. glock 19z

    glock 19z Supreme Member

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    I'd like to get into archery, and of course bowhunting, and am wondering what a low cost, but functional, bow would be. I've looked at the Dick's Sporting Goods website, but is there anywhere else or any other bows I should consider? What price range? Thanks, guys.
     
  2. f1b32oPTic

    f1b32oPTic R4d104c71v3

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    their parker bow packages look decent
     

  3. TScottW99

    TScottW99 NRA Life Member

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    I agree with the Parker suggestion. I bought a Parker last year, a Parker EZ Draw and love it. Great bow. They sell packages that come with arrows, sights, rest and quiver to get you started.

    I would suggest finding a bow shop and trying several bows on for size though. They can get you set up right.
     
  4. A_Swede_17_1911

    A_Swede_17_1911

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    You could go check out your local proshop. I would look for a bow that is forgiveing. In flaws with your shooting form. Something things to look for are the brace height, look for something over 7 1/2". This is the length between the grip and the string measured in a straight line at a 90 degree angle from the riser. Also look at a bow with a longer axle to axle length. This is the length between, the cams, wheels or eccentrics on the bow. Look for something that is 35" or longer. I wouldnt worry to much about the let-off ratings, just look for something that is 65% and above. An Archery Proshop is a great place to start, since they are very knowlegeable.

    Dont get to caught up in how fast a bow is, if your really worried about just getting started, and learning. Faster the bow usally the more expensive they are. I started out with a Browing Ambush, It had something like a 38" axle to axle lenght and a 8" brace height. It wasnt fast, it shot great, nice and smooth and I could get exellent arrow groups, were I couldnt shoot more than two arrows in to a target at 20yds without the risk of shooting off a nock. Browning quit making that model, but it was a a solid bow with good proven technology, and it wasnt expensive I paid under $200.00 for the bow. Compared to some that go for over $700 or more.

    I know shoot a Bow Tech Patriot, and its amazingly fast, and accurate. Also know your draw length a pro shop would be able to help you determine your drawlenght, and find the bow that would be a god fit for you.

    Also, what do you plan or using your bow for are some questions you should think of. If hunting out of a tree stand a shorter bow is usally more convient, and doesnt get in the way. The shorter bow is not as forgiving as on that is longer, in general. So you might have to look at what you need to give up on one area to gain in another.

    I like the Martin bow, they have some good solid technology, and bows in all different price ranges. Also Bow tech makes and awsome bow along with Mathews, but they are expensive, Hoyt makes great bows as well again they can be spendy. Im not to familar with the Jennings, and Bear bows. I know alot of people like the Parker bow that they own, so that would be one worth looking at.

    I also suggest shoot as many bows as you can get your hands on, some just feel better to the indvidual, kinda like a handgun or shotgun to other people. So good luck and have fun, and welcome to the sport.
     
  5. Frank in Montana

    Frank in Montana

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    Used to hunt with a traditional recurve when I was a kid as thats all we had. As the years passed I had to have a compound. They ended up being heavy, high maintenance and well........not traditional. With the sights, and releases,etc a heck of a lot easier to kill that deer though.
    Went back to a traditional recurve, no sights, just instinctive shooting. Bowhunting then started to mean something to me again. More of a challenge.

    Before you get seduced by the Dark Side go to a pro shop and try a recurve. You may like it.

    FN in MT
     
  6. punkture

    punkture

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    +1. Compounds are to bowhunting as inlines are to muzzleloading.
     
  7. Z34Lee

    Z34Lee Rush is Right!

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    My first and current bow is a PSE Nova. PSEs relatively cheap and it's worked well for me. I got a setup with the quiver, sights, and the rest of the gadgetry for about $300. Now that I have more money, I've been tempted by other bows, but the advantages of those don't seem to outweigh the added cost since I have no problems with mine and it's only a few years old.
     
  8. JKG

    JKG

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    I shoot traditional as well. Although not for everyone, its something to consider. It may take you longer to shoot well, but the simplicity really gives you a different perspective on archery.

    If you like to still hunt, a longbow, recurve, or even primitive bow is much lighter than a compound. No sights to align, releases to fiddle with, etc. Stickbows *can* be quieter than a compound too.

    Given what I just said, I shot a Matthews bare bow and it was awesome. Quiet, fast, and accurate. I'd like to get one, but I can't deal with sights and releases, so I'd go Nuge style...

    If you want some good reading and advice go to an archery site:

    http://www.bowsite.com/biggame/section.cfm?gameid=2

    http://www.bowsite.com/bowsite/tf/lw/threadsx2.cfm
     
  9. king catfish

    king catfish squirrelwhacker

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    I went the opposite route. I got a PSE Stingray that is super fast, 28" axle-to-axle, 70-lb draw weight, all the wrong choices for a beginner. It is small and light and unforgiving (and ultrafast, did I mention that?). It hits like a sledgehammer, but it took me a while to shoot it well. After two years of practice and two seasons of hunting I shoot consistent 5" groups at 50 paces. I don't think I'd try a shot on a real deer at farther than 40 paces. (Unfortunately, I have not yet had a deer come that close. Perhaps this year.)

    The moral of the story is, get what you want/like, and be willing to put in the time to use it well.