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What a gunfight sounds like

Discussion in 'Tactics and Training' started by TwinFourFives, Jan 24, 2010.

  1. TwinFourFives

    TwinFourFives

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    There is strong language in this audio. The "F-Word" is said a lot. It is the real audio of a gunfight that broke out between one armed man and 3 police officers.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEWHrr-btmA

    The lives of three Arizona police officers were threatened by an armed member of the Mexican Mafia. The suspect, who had fled from a traffic stop and nearly run down that police officer, had attempted to car-jack an innocent citizen and fled on foot as police closed in. As officers attempted to take the suspect into custody, a foot chase ensued. The suspect led officers over a wooden fence and into a backyard where he turned and opened fire on the three officers coming over the fence in pursuit. The resulting shootout between suspect and police was captured by an officer's digital recorder. No officers were injured during the gun fight. The suspect sustained a single gunshot wound to the abdomen. The suspect was convicted of attempted murder on police officers and was sentenced to 28 years in prison. ** Strong Language **
     
  2. golls17

    golls17 Lifetime Newbie

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    Pretty intense. You can't script that.

    Good presence of mind for the officer to call in shots fired while there's still bullets flying. I sure hope he was taking cover while making the call, then got right back in there...
     

  3. RonboF117

    RonboF117

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    I think this was a very interesting recording on a number of counts and I think it could be used as excellent debriefing material for both experienced and inexperienced officers.

    My caveats: I’m comparing this incident to training I’ve received or provided along with study and results of test or combat missions I’ve flown. I do not have all the facts of this incident and realize it is very difficult to have an accurate appraisal without visual and audio recordings combined for evaluation. My goal is to take this incident and make a teachable moment out of it so that we all may benefit.

    So as to not make this too long, one aspect I would debrief on this would be the breathing rate and tone pitch. The main officer in this engagement is out of breath (or at least a greatly elevated heart rate) and is usually yelling at a pitch higher than his normal (I suspect) voice.

    Disclaimer: I know if you are running and shots are being fired both of those are conducive to panting and yelling to be heard. However, in my observations I have found increased breathing rate and tone pitch to be indicative of less experienced individuals that have not been trained otherwise. It's a very normal reaction but can be overcome by specific training. The problem that you run into with elevated heart rates are loss of fine motor skills, auditory exclusion, and tunnel vision. These are all things you need in a firefight. Besides the detrimental effects it's imposing on your body; the increased volume level and high pitch can have an effect on those around you. As yelling, pitch level, and out of breath conversation continues, generally speaking, those around that individual will perceive the “yeller” to have reduced command presence and low situational awareness. Notice the timber, cadence, and volume at 1:20 and 2:20. It sounds like he’s been doing wind sprints. An increase in volume and intensity as well as swearing can make the other person really “sit up and take notice” if it’s not over-used. Think of anyone you know who is a screamer and you know that you can generally “tune them out” quickly. Compare the first officer to the other officer at 2:45 and the dispatcher at all times. In fact, the other officer even says, “Everybody slow it down a sec”. I think most would agree that the second two voices instill more confidence that the person talking has things in control.

    In the military the way we trained folks how to handle stressful situations was to create the situation, let them try on their own, and debrief it. We would then replicate the situation and show how a more experienced person would do it, and then debrief it. When you simulate and debrief things enough in the simulator and the actual jet, when things happen for real you revert to your training and just do business.

    Again, my goal is not to throw barbs at anyone but try to learn from other’s experiences as much as possible so that when we’re in tough situations the odds will be on our side.
     
  4. Sam Spade

    Sam Spade Staff Member Lifetime Member

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    Was DUSM Sam Gerard there? :whistling:


    Seriously, thanks for posting.
     
  5. TwinFourFives

    TwinFourFives

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    It was a real ear opener for me.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2010
  6. Sam Spade

    Sam Spade Staff Member Lifetime Member

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    :zipmouth:


    :cheers:
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2010
  7. tuna

    tuna

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    That was intense! Very glad to hear only the bad guy was shot.

    You can hear the LEOs breathing get very heavy after the threat had been diffused & the reality of what just happened sank in.

    Thank you to all the police men & women out there! Stay safe & shoot straight :)