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What A Group Of Very Clueful Folks Carry

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My take away regarding the online survey is that a population of certified instructors were asked their opinion on various characteristics including what they actually use. I took it as a reference and take it or leave it survey.
I did not interpret as an agency buyers guide or even a selection recommendation to the public or students.
Even though it could be useful to someone looking for ideas etc.
Personally using a 9mm Glock or M&P with 124 Gold Dot or HST and a handheld light seems like pretty good system for any private concealed carrier or home defense system at a cost effective price.
 

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I've met or have known my fair share of instructors were could probably be considered well informed. The majority of them were LE instructors, but now and again I came across some who also taught outside/commercial classes.

While it might have sometimes been of occasional passing interest what some instructor might be carrying, it wasn't of any real significance or interest to me. Instead, I was primarily interested in how well they could use whatever it was they were carrying. That hasn't changed.

Over the years of seeing different age groups (generations, if you'd rather) come through ranges and classes, I noted that the choices were often influenced by the backgrounds and work experience of the instructors.

The "age of plastic" could still mean someone who may have formerly used 1911's or revolvers for work, of course, depending on their age and experience, but it often started to mean that they were simply new enough to being instructors that they'd only really experienced using one or another of the current crop of plastic pistols.

I've seen my fair share of newer LE firearms instructors who simply weren't at all familiar with 1911's or revolvers. The lingering presence of some TDA (DA/SA) pistols in the LE field was as close as some of them had ever come to SA or DA triggers, and not everyone was comfortable or seemingly well experienced in those.

I've had some less experienced firearms instructors look at me weirdly when I opined that there's a difference between being experienced "enough" (with a particular gun make/model/caliber) for the specific agency or student/staff group you're responsible to help ... versus being a firearms instructor well versed and experienced in using a variety of handguns that might be used in both duty and off-duty roles by the people you're helping train and qualify. (Kind of like so many newer LE instructors want to be rifle instructors, but give scant attention to learning to run/teach shotgun.)

This is where I suspect (hope?) that private/commercial firearms instructors might still have some more leeway (or at least interest) in what they're willing to learn themselves, and make themselves able to teach to others.

Equipment choice is either a personal matter (for any number of possible reasons), or a professional matter (issued equipment, policy restrictions, etc). If someone is looking to an instructor for guidance or suggestions, hopefully that person understands the reasoning being used by the instructor, and can decide for themselves whatever has influenced the instructor is of any particular significance or relevance to them, as students. I've certainly helped other shooters (as an instructor) when they were using different equipment/weapons than me, and if it worked for them, it worked for me. ;)

Whenever I've been asked for advice in selection of off-duty weapons, I always tried to take the familiarity, training and experience of the person into consideration. I listened to their preferences, and asked questions to try and gain some insight into why they had those preferences. I also tried to let them try examples of their preferences on the firing line (if I or another instructor owned them, or we had any in the training inventory).

Naturally, sometimes a little live-fire can change someone's mind, and then it was a matter of finding out why they suddenly changed their minds, and going forward from there.

It probably helped that I owned/carried 3 of the major pistol duty calibers, including a variety of pistols in standard, compact & subcompact sizes, and still used/carried revolvers and 1911's.

I didn't shill guns or calibers, nor expected anyone I was responsible to train to emulate my choices or preferences. My choices, and reasons, might have little relevance to any particular guy or gal asking for suggestions. It had to be about, and for, them. ;)
The decision to utilize weapon or hand held light sources needn't be a mutually exclusive one.

Aside from the pile of broken parts from different weapon lights I watched grow on our armory bench, and the occasional problems experienced by owners/users, the subject of weapon lights can be one which is more than a little variable when it comes to the LE instructors I've known, and with whom I've worked alongside. (This includes some instructors who also served as swat or other special enforcement firearms instructors outside of their "regualr" LE instructor duties.)

Hanging a light on a pistol is a bit different that using one on a slung long gun. The holster has to either accommodate the pistol with the light attached, or else the user has to have the time and ability to retrieve the light and attach it after drawing the weapon from the holster.

Drawing and holstering with a light attached may present a difference in technique for some users (holsters, type of light and how it changes the configuration profile, etc).

The use of weapon lights means the light is only able to be ON when the weapon is drawn ... but there are any number of possible situations where a cop may not have determined drawing his/her weapon is reasonable and appropriate (or within policy), yet, but he/she still needs to illuminate something. That's obviously the purpose of a hand held light, right? If you've already got that hand held light in your non-dominant hand, and are actively using it, and then decide it's necessary to draw a weapon ... you either have to continue using the hand held unit, or take the time and manipulative effort to secure it (or drop it?).

I've seldom seen a LE firearms instructor (I've personally known) who regularly used a weapon-mounted light on-duty, who also carried a light mounted to their off-duty weapon. The handful of times I've seen one try it, it was the bulk of the concealment holster which eventually seemed to cause them to change their mind. They'll often carry a small hand held light, though.

Another issue regarding weapon-mounted lights is learning when and how to utilize the light spray, without sweeping something that's not been clearly identified as a threat which is going to be shot.

Then, there's the issue of training sufficient to help prevent hand/finger confusion from occurring under stress, causing an unintended trigger press instead of a light switch press/activation. Training issue.
Now THIS is a man with whom I would like to train and whose advice I would consider.
 

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And just who were and are these "clueful" people to whom he is referring? Does he provide a list of names and credentials?
They're 100 of the Rangemaster certified instructors. The list includes some very good names. John Murphy, Mike Green, Karl Rehn, Tiffany Johnson, John Johnston, Melody Lauer, John Hearne, Lynn Givens, Tom Givens, Lee Weems, among others. I believe Claude Werner, Tamara Keel, Chuck Haggard, and Sherman House are all Rangemaster Certified as well. And, obviously, John Correia.
 

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I always looked at it like this. There are people I'll point a flashlight at and people I'll point a pistol at. They ain't necessarily the same people.
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
yeah....I'll stand my ground on "impactful", as the "usage" in that link indicates. We had a perfectly good word in "effective" before we started using the word "impact" incorrectly. But yes, as words get misused, they do indeed work their way into the dictionary as languages "evolve".
This is one of my pet peeves. Our language has been butchered and bastardized in recent times. It is sad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
Survey population is rangemaster certified instructors that self-selected responded to the online survey.
One additional item of interest to me is that the respondent preferred hand held lights vs. hangun attached lights.
I was surprised by this too. I thought more would carry WML.
 

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I'm not hep with the modern vernacular. Take "preventative" (sic). It's appearing on dictionary sites simply due to common illiteracy.

When I hear it, I usually interrupt and say "There's no tit in preventive. Actually it's tat, but I'd rather say tit."
 

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I'd never carry anything else.

Did Tom have a brother named Eule?

"Ever eat a pine tree? Many parts are edible. It's crunchy, nut like flavor reminds me of wild hickory nuts."
 
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