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Were any of your parents old enough to see New Years 1910?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by SnowCajun, Jan 1, 2010.

  1. SnowCajun

    SnowCajun Old, no cure!

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    Were any of your parents old enough to see New Years 1910? You know at times it's really hard for me to imagine that if my father were still alive he'd be 103 right now, 104 in June, so he would have been alive New Years 1910. I doubt he'd have remembered it being just 3 1/2 years old, but still what a time to grow up, a time before cars were everywhere, before electric lights were everywhere, before indoor plumbing, TV, or even radio, and he remembers there being no cars in town, just horses and buggies, but Ford's Model T wasn't far off, I guess it just hadn't reached that far down south yet.
     
  2. 9jeeps

    9jeeps

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    My Dad, now passed. Would have remembered 1910. He didn't think we'd ever reach the 90's. I didn't think I'd reach the 90's!
     

  3. Zell

    Zell IrregularMember

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    Nope. Dad is 85 and mom passed away 13 years ago. She was just a year younger than my dad.
     
  4. sopdan

    sopdan

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    My parents are in their late 50's, grandparents in their late 80's. So no... but my great-grandmothers were the only ones left from their generation of my family while I was still alive. They were born in the late 1800s.

    One of them shared a nursing home room with a lady that hid under a stagecoach during the Jesse James Northfield, MN shootout. (she was a little girl at the time)
     
  5. ScarFace88

    ScarFace88 I swear I had something for this...

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    All of my grandparents were born after that so, no.
     
  6. Smashy

    Smashy

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    No, they were born in the '30s. But they've told me the stories of constantly running to the shelters as London was being bombed.
     
  7. bush pilot

    bush pilot

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    I had an uncle who passed away a couple of years ago, he was almost 100 years old. His father was born in 1868, that's only 3 years after the Civil War, damn.
     
  8. SnowCajun

    SnowCajun Old, no cure!

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    That made me think of something, my brother hired a live in maid to help my mother while she was recovering from a heart attack that lead to them discovering lung cancer. He hired a Japanese lady named Kiko and she was really quite a sweet lady about my mothers age, which meant she was born around the 1920's.

    The funny thing about my mother was because of Pearl Harbor she hated the Japanese, but she got along with Kiko, or at least tolerated her. My mom got used enough to Kiko that they would share a little drink together each evening after Kiko's work was done.

    One day I asked Kiko if she remembered much about WWII, that I didn't know her age and didn't know how old she was during that time or even if she was born then. She remarked that she was a young teenage girl, but she very clearly remembers the skies being filled with bombers she said, she remembers the ground shaking like an earthquake from the explosions of the bombs in the distance. She said that they were starving and her entire family had only a small jar of fried rice for all to eat at night and how hard it was to survive.

    My mother was aghast that I would have asked such a thing, but I didn't see anything wrong with the question, it's history, at the time I asked that in 1988 the war had been over 43 years. I actually felt sad for Kiko, she said she still had nightmares of the planes .. I guess that wouldn't be hard to imagine, I've never been bombed so I'm not sure how it'd effect me either, and by the end of the WWII those huge B-29's were carpet bombing huge areas with both regular bombs and incendiaries.

    Anyway you mentioned continually running to shelters and that made me remember her talking about that also! So many of these stories are dying off with people as they pass on with age, that's sad because it's part of history that we should learn from, a good view of what war does to everyone, not just the soldiers.
     
  9. majic man

    majic man

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    The only people I know that would remember that are my great-great aunt who is 103 and my great-great uncle who is 101. I have only met them a few times though. You don't see a brother and sister both live that long very often.:wow:

    Some of the stories you get to listen are amazing. Everytime I see my G-G uncle he tells me how he was walking on the same street that John Dillinger was on when he was shot. He heard the gunshots and saw all the comotion.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2010
  10. Glock-it-to-me

    Glock-it-to-me Catching liars

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    Close. My father who passed away in 2002, was born in 1912.
     
  11. kahrcarrier

    kahrcarrier FAHRENHEIT

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    Not precisely.


    My father was born in 1917. His mother was born in 1881. Still during the days of the Wild West...........


    During her lifetime people went from riding horses to riding jet aircraft and exploring space.
     
  12. Generalcarry

    Generalcarry NRA Member

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    Yeah, both of my parents had seen 1910.
     
  13. bassman-dan

    bassman-dan NRA Lifer

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    My father was born in 1898 and my mother in 1906.
    They are both gone now but it was very interesting to hear stories of what life was like in the early 20th century. Life was so different as to be hard to imagine.
    It has always made me wonder in what ways the world will be different in 50-100 years.
     
  14. byf43

    byf43 NRA Endowment Life Member

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    No.
    My parents were born in '23 and '24.
    Dad is 85, now, and Mom is 86.

    We didn't think Dad was going to be here at Christmas. Alzheimer's has taken it's toll on him, and he's going downhill, fast.

    It's a shame, really. He is a good man and a GREAT Dad!
     
  15. Rabbi

    Rabbi The Bombdiggity Lifetime Member

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    Yes, my legal Father, My Grandfather OBM, was born in 1909.

    The first job he ever had was working for a Civil War Vet.
     
  16. NanH

    NanH

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    My grandfather was born in 1887. He died in '79. Thinking about the range of technological advances he saw in his lifetime is amazing.

    He raced bicycles all over Europe, went into Russia to race there and knew there was major bad juju coming out of that country, started his worklife as a blacksmith in Germany, came here between the wars, got badly harassed about being German during the war, even though he was the one with the grapevines that kept those same neighbors drinking wine during the depression and taught all the neighbors how to plant a better garden. And before he dies, he sees a man walk on the moon.

    Now that's a life.
     
  17. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    My grandmother. She still lives alone. :faint:
     
  18. Annhl8rX

    Annhl8rX

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    My great grandparents weren't even around then.
     
  19. Buki192327

    Buki192327

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    My Dad, who passed in 1986, was born in May of 1905. My Mom, who passed in 1996, was born in May of 1910.

    All of my grandparents, were born in the 1880s and 1890s. 3 of my grandparents, were deceased before I was born.
     
  20. Palouse

    Palouse The Resistance Lifetime Member

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    My father was born in 1932, and his family wasn't able to get electricity until 1948 after the Obey River was dammed. He plowed with a mule as a teen, and they didn't eat anything they didn't raise or grow or trade for.

    My wife's g-grandfather here in WA, on the other hand, was farming with two 1932 McCormick Deering TD-40 tractors and had knob and tube in the house.