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Ba-nan-nah-nuh
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's a c/p from another post:
(ibid) ......I'll agree and add that the Glock gen 4 dual spring RSA seems to be a great balance between light range 10mm and sub-nuclear Underwood loads.
.......... Let me get this straight - and I'm sure some of youse guys will correct my thinking here...... the 'dual-rate' spring is what I'm having trouble wrapping my head around here.


So - as I see it ..... the first part of the RSA - the lighter spring I'm talking about here ..... is it just for lighter loads?

Is the fact that the heavier-slash-secondary spring is for a hotter load?

OK - I'm sure that has stirred up a hornets nest - is the RSA being dual purposed - is this Glock engineering a spring that can swing both ways - and what's this do the the total travel of the slide?

I mean - if the load is light and the primary spring alone absorbs the impact - then the travel may not rack in a new round - because the slide cannot go past the initial impact of the secondary spring and it stops right there.......right?

I'm not playing with wildly different loads or power, and I know that my G20.4 just works - but I'm a little lost at this dichotomous concept.
 

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Where are you digging up any reference to a "dual rate" spring? It's not in your quoted text.

There is no such thing as a "dual rate" spring unless one spring bottoms out and turns the RSA into one whose spring force is now determined only by the remaining spring that still has some travel to get to full compression. That's not too useful, and neither spring bottoms out in a Glock captive dual spring RSA.

Because neither spring in a Glock dual-spring RSA bottoms out, both concentric springs compress during slide recoil. The amount of compression of each spring depends only on how far the slide recoils, not on the power of the load fired. The total RSA compression is limited by the metal stops embedded in the polymer at the rear of the frame dustcover. The metal stops are part of the front slide rail structure that's embedded in the frame polymer. If two different loads sends the slide into the stops, the springs will have compressed the same amount, regardless of load power factor.

The principle value of a concentric dual spring RSA is that it allows more effective spring turns in the fixed distance that the spring compresses than does a single spring RSA. More effective turns means less flexing of each individual turn as the whole RSA is compressed. Less flexing of each turn means longer life span in compression cycles before the spring's compressed force drops too low and requires RSA replacement. That's why dual-spring RSAs have a longer service life than single-spring RSAs. That's the main real and tangible value of the dual-spring RSA.
 

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MacGyver
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I love it when English majors try to analyze music theory, or plumbers diagnosing a medical condition.
 

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uhhhhhh, do we factually KNOW what each of the "spring rates" are for each spring in a RSA?
I look at the 2 springs working like a progressive spring in a automotive suspension.
Lighter spring starts to work, BEFORE the secondary heavier spring takes over.
 

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Ba-nan-nah-nuh
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
uhhhhhh, do we factually KNOW what each of the "spring rates" are for each spring in a RSA?
I look at the 2 springs working like a progressive spring in a automotive suspension.
Lighter spring starts to work, BEFORE the secondary heavier spring takes over.
That's what I think too. The second spring is so much shorter that it doesn't come into play until the longer spring is already 1/3rd compressed.

There's more to this design than meets the eye I think. I begin to believe that with light loads the secondary spring may not get compressed as much as it should.

If racking-in requires the slide to go all the way to the mechanical stop, that may not happen with light loads.

There's a hidden dynamic here, someplace.
 

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That's what I think too. The second spring is so much shorter that it doesn't come into play until the longer spring is already 1/3rd compressed.

There's more to this design than meets the eye I think. I begin to believe that with light loads the secondary spring may not get compressed as much as it should.

If racking-in requires the slide to go all the way to the mechanical stop, that may not happen with light loads.

There's a hidden dynamic here, someplace.
Pretty close to what i was thinkin as well. There is a reason why they do this.
I believe it is to cushion the recoiling effect in the timing length of the cycle.
Afterall, that IS one of the reasons why they adopted this type system... to make it shoot softer.
 
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