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Water heater drip

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by meathead19, Aug 15, 2012.

  1. meathead19

    meathead19

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    I just noticed this nice drip, almost a stream, coming from inside the copper tubing.

    The dishwasher is on, and has kicked on the water heater. The water coming from the tube is hot.

    It has stopped as dishwasher has finished.

    Is this normal? Please tell me yes....I don't really want to buy a water heater right now.

    Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2012
  2. MARKDANIEL

    MARKDANIEL

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    No it is not normal but it is an easy fix. Buy a new safety pressure valve turn off water supply to water heater run some hot water until no pressure remaining in hot water tank shut off faucet that you drained pressure out of remove pipe and change valve
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2012

  3. meathead19

    meathead19

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    but there's a warning.....and it's a gas water heater.

    OK...called whirlpool.

    He said it's normal if a little puddle forms as it's condensation b/c it's gas.

    It's out of warranty, as of Jan this year and made in 2006. So, it should be good for atleast 10 yrs.....2016. Fingers crossed.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2012
  4. HerrGlock

    HerrGlock Scouts Out CLM

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    It's not normal. That's a leaking overflow valve. Easy fix, as stated above, but it does need fixed.
     
  5. Viper16

    Viper16

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    The seat on the relief valve is probably gunked up or once it was relieved it never reseated.

    The reason for a professional to reinstall is because of the code for running the drain pipe (it must never be reduced and can only be increased in size) and the valve has certain relief settings (depending on valve you have to relief pressure and sometimes temperature) whether it be relief @ 50 PSI or at 50 PSI and/or 175F etc..

    You also need to pay good attention to the capacity that the relief valve can relief. I believe if it is just pressure relief, then you if you match the pressure relief and the capacity (in BTU/H) to the existing, and only install the drain size to match the outlet port of the valve, you will be fine.
     
  6. gigab1te

    gigab1te

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    It probably is your valve. There is no way condensation from the flame is going out that pipe. You can probably live with it, but you really, really, don't want to be around if that valve goes. At a minimum, make sure the pipe runs outside! If it was me, I'd replace the valve or hire a handyman to do it.
     
  7. meathead19

    meathead19

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    given a quote to replace the valve......$110.00

    Sound reasonable?

    He said it would take about 45 mins.
     
  8. RC-RAMIE

    RC-RAMIE

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    I brought one at Lowe's last weekend $16 took about 30 mins to change if you have the tools.

    $110 for house call, labor and part I would say not bad.
     
  9. Adjuster

    Adjuster

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    Mine was dripping just like yours. I drained and flushed out the tank. I worked the pressure relief valve lever several times to loosen any stuck dirt. I then took a garden hose with sprayer and forced water up into the relief pipe while working the lever to back flush the valve. Worked perfectly and no more leaking.



    /
     
  10. TheExplorer

    TheExplorer

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    It is an easy fix, that price is reasonable if you don't feel comfortable. They're not made like they used to be and most plumbers will tell you 10 years is the life expectancy. Anything after that is borrowed time. Having gone through a burst at 12 years I can tell you it is a big mess. If that doesn't work, you may need an expansion tank. They have recently been boosting the water pressure for the extension in my neighborhood and I had to install one.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2012
  11. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    I'm not even sure if 10yrs is their expectancy. Most of them are crapping out right after their 6yr warranty expires. I've sold so many 10yr warranties, that the customer got a new heater on, it's almost like getting a 2 for 1 for the customer (10yr usually runs about $180)
     
  12. meathead19

    meathead19

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    I do have a well saver expansion tank & no water when I push valve.

    Just worked the valve couple times. & had gunk come out first time.

    Other 4 times were clear.
     
  13. Viper16

    Viper16

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    Expansion tanks are only to expand the hot water in the line once it is heated. You really need a pressure reducing valve after your main meter. This will prevent any spikes in pressure to cause things to rupture, and will lower the pressure in your home so you do not prematurely wear out valves in your home, such as faucets, toilet valves, and solenoids in your dishwasher, icemaker, and clothing washer. I have about 80PSI static but running it drops to 60PSI, and the soft seats on my valves dont last near as long as they should because of the high pressures.
     
  14. TheExplorer

    TheExplorer

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    You're right, but many homes don't have a second valve. My neighborhood's pressure is already fairly low and would be down to nothing if one was installed. My whole neighborhood was poorly designed and they refuse to replace any pipes so the first phases of homes get pressure spikes.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2012
  15. davew83

    davew83 hhhhhhhhmmmmmmm

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    If you need to get it fixed I can get it done tomorrow or Friday, shoot me a PM if you want. I am in Greenville also.
     
  16. Whirlpoolwaterheater

    Whirlpoolwaterheater

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    Sorry to see you're having problems! Can you contact me directly so I can help?
    www.whirlpoolwaterheaters.com/help
    Thanks! ~ Chris
    American Water Heater, authorized licensee for Whirlpool Water Heaters