want a better Turkey? Brine it.

Discussion in 'Food Forum' started by lethal tupperwa, Nov 21, 2005.

  1. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    This will give you a moist bird.




    Good Eats Roast Turkey Recipe courtesy Alton Brown



    Recipe Summary
    Yield: 10 to 12 servings
    User Rating:




    1 (14 to 16 pound) frozen young turkey
    For the brine:
    1 cup kosher salt
    1/2 cup light brown sugar
    1 gallon vegetable stock
    1 tablespoon black peppercorns
    1/2 tablespoon allspice berries
    1/2 tablespoon candied ginger
    1 gallon iced water
    For the aromatics:
    1 red apple, sliced
    1/2 onion, sliced
    1 cinnamon stick
    1 cup water
    4 sprigs rosemary
    6 leaves sage
    Canola oil

    Combine all brine ingredients, except ice water, in a stockpot, and bring to a boil. Stir to dissolve solids, then remove from heat, cool to room temperature, and refrigerate until thoroughly chilled.
    Early on the day of cooking, (or late the night before) combine the brine and ice water in a clean 5-gallon bucket. Place thawed turkey breast side down in brine, cover, and refrigerate or set in cool area (like a basement) for 6 hours. Turn turkey over once, half way through brining.
    A few minutes before roasting, heat oven to 500 degrees. Combine the apple, onion, cinnamon stick, and cup of water in a microwave safe dish and microwave on high for 5 minutes.
    Remove bird from brine and rinse inside and out with cold water. Discard brine.
    Place bird on roasting rack inside wide, low pan and pat dry with paper towels. Add steeped aromatics to cavity along with rosemary and sage. Tuck back wings and coat whole bird liberally with canola (or other neutral) oil.
    Roast on lowest level of the oven at 500 degrees F. for 30 minutes. Remove from oven and cover breast with double layer of aluminum foil, insert probe thermometer into thickest part of the breast and return to oven, reducing temperature to 350 degrees F. Set thermometer alarm (if available) to 161 degrees. A 14 to 16 pound bird should require a total of 2 to 2 1/2 hours of roasting. Let turkey rest, loosely covered for 15 minutes before carving.
     
  2. Mild Bill

    Mild Bill Millennium Member

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    I'll never cook a turkey that wasn't brined first...

    Historically, by the time the dark meat is cooked thoroughly to the joints,
    the white meat is dry...
    Brining keeps the white meat juicy and more flavorful...

    You can count on that classic turkey flavor...
    It's especially noticable when you're snacking on cold leftovers or making sammiches...

    It's like, it's like; "damn!"....

    The frozen, not the fresh, Butterballs are pre brined... or at least treated similarly,
    so they'll save some time...

    ;c
     

  3. stooxie

    stooxie NRA Life Member

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    Right, brining is a good idea for the Tom/white turkey whose breat has been bred to be huge in proportion to the rest of the body. Yeah, you pretty much have to do something.

    However, if you have a wild turkey or heritage turkey you don't need to brine because the whole thing will cook properly in the first place.

    -Stooxie
     
  4. Mild Bill

    Mild Bill Millennium Member

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    I'm dying to get my hands on any wild game meat/bird...

    I've only eaten commercially raised stuff...

    ;c
     
  5. VictorLouis

    VictorLouis

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    After years of trying everything else, I'm convinced that a Reynold's Roasting Bag is THEE way to go regardless of what else you may do to prep your bird.

    That is, of course, UNLESS you're deep-frying.;f
     
  6. lonewolf28152

    lonewolf28152

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    A store bought turkey doesn't even come close to a wild turkey.
     
  7. Fungunner

    Fungunner

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    +1
     
  8. UTKEngineer

    UTKEngineer

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    +1 to Deep Frying turkeys. I'll never willing go back to baking the bird!
     
  9. Mild Bill

    Mild Bill Millennium Member

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    Wow...

    That's what they say about real Salmon too...
    I LOVE the colored farm stuff, but supposedly 'Copper River' and other wild types
    make that farm stuff, in comparison, taste like cardboard...

    Gotta get up to the Pacific Northwest...

    ;c
     
  10. dougader

    dougader

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    I've tried everything, too... deep frying, reynolds bags, etc... but brining the bird then roasting normally is the bestest, moistest turkey I ever et. I'll never cook a turkey again withtout brining it first.

    I've had some pretty tasty farmed salmon... but the wild stuff doesn't come with all the extra pcb's, ya know... ;)
     
  11. okla-lawman

    okla-lawman

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    I got two turkey breasts for Christmas. I got this brine recipe off of food network and did it. After brining I put them on my grill over low flame with lots of mesquite chips.
    Best damn Turkey I ever had. Most and tasty.......
     
  12. Glockdude1

    Glockdude1 Federal Member CLM

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    Yes don't forget to have a bottle of "Real Wild turkey" to go with the wild turkey on the dinner table..........

    ;N
     
  13. noway

    noway

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    Glockdude what time is dinner ;)

    Wild turkery and a wild turkery (alcohol ) on the rocks is a good dinner companion.

    If you want a good turkey try the deep fryer. HMMM hmmm hmmm ! good!!
     
  14. Glockdude1

    Glockdude1 Federal Member CLM

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    noway,

    I will have the bird out of my turkey fryer at 7pm sharp. Hope you like it a little spicy. I use a Creole butter recipe. I fry with peanut oil. The bird is juicy and falls off the bone.... ;)

    ;N
     
  15. sx-al

    sx-al Go Canes! CLM

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    +1 for brining the bird.

    I tried both the foodtv recipies. One for the traditional oven bird w/ the citrus. The other was the BBQ w/ honey brine. Man they were pretty good. For someone who has never made a turkey, I had both come out nice and juicy.

    The butter rub on the skin really does the trick w/ browning.
     
  16. FlaChef

    FlaChef Steyroid

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    basic brine is brown sugar, kosher slat, water. Just expand the ratios given for how much you need.

    from there get creative, I love to add some booze, JD or J.Bean. Herbs depending on flavor profile you want.


    brining is also useful for large cuts of pork, brisket, and duck