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Voltage fluctuations

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by Starvin, Feb 21, 2007.

  1. Starvin

    Starvin

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    Can small changes in voltage have an affect on a computer? Mine seems to go from 124V to 111.
     
  2. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    The computer power supplies are regulated to low DC voltages and small changes im the high AC voltage shouldn't matter.
     

  3. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    Most computer power supplies will handle at least 110v to 125v and usually even more variation than that.
     
  4. BilltheCat

    BilltheCat Quieter Cat Millennium Member

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    what he said, he is correct. That said if your power supply is not doing it'd job properly the voltage may sink below what you need. not likely tho.
     
  5. Blitzer

    Blitzer Cool Cat

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    What do you believe is causing such a variance?

    With the large of swing it sounds like your wiring is deficient, a 10% fluctuation is serious. It looks like it is time to have your electrical wiring checked! :shocked: ;)
     
  6. Minuteman

    Minuteman Jeff Gannon???

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    I agree. That's too much variation.
    Is there a high current device on the same circuit? Like a heater or air compressor?
    If you are drawing too much current on a circuit you could cause a voltage drop. This is easily fixed by placing the loads on different circuits designed to handle the load.

    For example, my freind had a portable heater, t.v., computer, stereo, fan, lights, and a small fridge all on the same circuit. Most of it on the same power strip.

    Then he asks me why he's having power problems.

    :upeyes:
     
  7. aspartz

    aspartz

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    Every time the fuser on my old laser printer (i got it used from Noah)starts, all of my UPSes on the same circuit get alarmed. Apparently the 1943 wiring in my house is not up the current draw.

    ARS
     
  8. Minuteman

    Minuteman Jeff Gannon???

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    In my experience older wiring is fine. Obviously you can't put huge loads on it.
    Usually the problem is that some one has screwed with it along the way. It is the modifications that are the problem, not the original wiring.

    Also we need good grounds. Old homes don't have that. You can drive a new ground rod to use as a signal ground. I do this for high end audio.
    Do not use a water pipe.



    :patriot:
     
  9. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    If it troubles you, buy a dual-conversion UPS. They're not that expensive (<$400) and come standard with a healthy dollop of peace of mind.