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Video How-to's

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by bohr, Feb 9, 2006.

  1. bohr

    bohr rm -rf /

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    Hi All,

    I was surfing a site that had video howto's. The video was a computer screen with a voice-over explaining what to do while illustrating it. Anyone know where to get software that does this?
     
  2. Furant

    Furant Millennium Member

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    Camtasia Studio will do what you want. There might be some cheaper solutions, but my company uses this frequently and it seems fairly powerful.

    Joey
     

  3. Jafo2001

    Jafo2001

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    Where I work, they use Macromedia Flash for doing these type of things. We have also used freeware solutions like screen capture programs then making an AVI that adds audio, but it is a much more "clunkey" solution than the comercial software.
     
  4. Blue59

    Blue59

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    There's a couple free ones, but they aren't "ideal".
    The best ones capture nearly-all video and sound automatically, and can edit and even recode the avi with a codec to reduce its file size. Some of the lesser ones will only capture the screen video, and don't do recoding.
    Here's one free one:
    http://www.wisdom-soft.com/products/autoscreenrecorder.htm
    -it captures the screen, but not the sound. It also doesn't have any editing capabilities, and the files are uncompressed avi, so they end up pretty huge. If you use this to capture a movie playing in Quicktime or RealPlayer for example, the uncompressed avi may easily be several times the file size of the original movie.

    Ideally (using the above free program) you would capture the video and the sound you wanted (using a prpogram like TotalRecorder, or if you have a Creative soundcard, they can usually do sound capture themselves). Then you would use a sound-dubbing program to join the sound with the video, and finally you would use a re-encoder with a codec like DivX to decrease the movie's filesize.
    Some basic free video-editing programs and info (for joining sound and re-encoding) are available at
    http://www.doom9.org/
    ------
    Also note--Windows supports DRM (Digital Rights Management) software intended to prevent users from making copies of media. So there are various ways of preventing you from recording your own computer's screen with any program. FOr most of these methods, there are ways to overcome them, but not all.

    Usually--for DVD-player programs (like PowerDVD), RealPlayer and Quicktime, you can just turn off the program's and your PC's video hardware accelleration, and then the video is the same but then captureable. Recently I tried to run Windows Media Player without any hardware accelleration and it wouldn't run right, only showing one frame every 5 seconds or so. So I dunno how you can capture that, but there is probably a way.
    ~