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video editing/laptop question

Discussion in 'Through-the-Lens Club' started by charlieschoice, Aug 23, 2004.

  1. charlieschoice

    charlieschoice

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    Apologies if this isn't the place for this question.

    I would like to edit and transfer my mini dv tapes to dvd.

    Could anyone explain to a computer idiot what type of laptop I should be looking for?

    My understanding is that a "desktop" computer would be a "better choice" for this due to it's storage capacity, but at this point in time, a "desktop" is out of the question.


    I currently have a laptop for work, but it's old and from what I've been told, won't have the "capacity" to handle any type of video "work".

    I've been told to call Dell and they can build me one, but honestly, I can't even figure out their website.

    If anyone can steer me in the right direction, I would appreciate it.

    Thanks
     
  2. Bdnbrck

    Bdnbrck

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    Video editing requires alot of power to do it efficiently. your best best is to look into a Laptop that is classified as a "Desktop Replacement" Meaning that it has most fo the features and hardware that a desktop might have, but of course in a smaller package. The Hp ZD series have had good reviews and are powerful like a desktop

    Laptops are always a litte behind the desktop in terms of power, so its unlikely that you will find one thats a direct replacement for a desktop, especially in the video card area.

    The down side of a desktop replacment is that they are usually larger, less portable, and heavier. They also use battery power like no other. According to most reviews some are only getting 100 minutes of DVD video on a full battery.

    This si the Spec for the ZD 7280US Remarkably powerful for a laptop but also $2600. Whats the budget?

    • Intel® Pentium® 4 processor (3.2GHz) with HT Technology
    • Windows XP Media Center
    • 1024MB DDR SDRAM
    • 80GB hard drive
    • DVD+R/RW and CD-RW combo drive
    • 17" WSXGA+ high-definition widescreen display (Brightview)
    • NVIDIA® GeForce™ FX Go5700 graphics
    • 54g™ integrated 802.11b/g wireless LAN
    • 5-in-1 digital media card reader
    • Remote control, USB TV and tuner
    • Personal video recorder
     

  3. charlieschoice

    charlieschoice

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    Bdnbrck

    Thanks for the info.

    Luckily my wife works as well, so $2700 is "workable" (although I don't want to think what I can buy at the gun shop for that amount).

    Can I ask, what is your opinon on the Mac version?

    Reason I ask is I have a good buddy in "video boating" and he highly reccomends the Mac for video work. My counterpart's (at work) wife works as a graphic artist at the local paper and she speaks highly of Mac as well.

    Can I assume (I know about that word) that the spec's you gave me on the ZD is where I want to be as far as "power"?

    Although I may be a computer idiot, my wife writes software, so if you can throw anything else out there towards me, I can have her decipher it for me.

    Again, thanks.
     
  4. Bdnbrck

    Bdnbrck

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    I've never used a modern Mac for anything so I couldn't comment. Last Mac I used with the original Macintosh, you know the square one thats a monitor and PC in one, with the 7" screen.

    Also, be aware of what exactly you want the laptop to do. If you truly just want a desktop that you can take every once in a while, then a desktop replacement might be for you. If you plan to take it on trips, in the car, etc.. then maybe something with more battery life might be up your alley.

    I did read this, this morning...

    Apple Computer Inc. has agreed to recall about 28,000 batteries used in its 15-inch PowerBook G4 laptop computers, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said on Thursday.

    The batteries, made by LG Chem Ltd. of South Korea, could overheat and pose a fire hazard to consumers, the CPSC said. Apple received four reports of these batteries overheating, though no injuries have been reported.

    The recalled batteries have the Model Number: A1045 and serial numbers that begin with: HQ404, HQ405, HQ406, HQ407, or HQ408. Batteries with the affected serial numbers contain cells that were manufactured by LG Chem, Ltd. of South Korea during the last week of December 2003 only, according to an Apple.

    A message posted on Apple's website urges owners to stop using the recalled battery and to order a replacement battery immediately. "If you continue to use your battery, do not leave it unattended and check for signs of overheating," the company says.

    Full details of the 15-inch PowerBook G4 Battery Exchange Program are now publicly available on Apple's website.

    Apple claims to have voluntarily initiated the exchange program and will provide eligible customers with a new replacement battery, free of charge.

    The company says that no other PowerBook or iBook batteries are part of the recall
     
  5. Wicked96SS

    Wicked96SS Typical Gun Nut Millennium Member

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    You have got to be kidding me... I currently use a Pentium III 900 MHz with 128 MB of RAM to do digital video editing... the only thing that is slow about it is when you actually have to render the video... The actual editing of the captured clips is plenty fast. The only reason you would need a faster computer is if you want to render the video faster.

    I am using Sonic Foundry's Video Editing Studio... works great, captures great, 2 video tracks and 5 audio tracks... Never had a problem working with it.

    Hardly need a TON of storage space for it, but it helps... I am sure you can get an 80 Gig drive in a laptop, if you really wanted to. Although I edited several video with a measly 40 GB... If you need to capture HOURS of DV, then you probably should invest in some sort of external drive if you still insist on going with a laptop. I have a 120 GB external firewire drive that works fine, but is expensive.

    I would really save yourself some money and not get a laptop... but if you are hooked on getting one, you don't have to have a super duper fancy one to get one that works... I would bet you could do it a whole lot cheaper than $2700.00, but then again, I don't keep up with laptop prices.
     
  6. podwich

    podwich

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    Video editing requires a decent CPU, good amount of memory (RAM), large enough hard drive, decent video card, as well as the requisite DVD burner that records in the format you want (DVD+R vs. DVD-R for the most part) and input port for the camera (IEEE 1394 aka Firewire for digital camcorders or an analog-to-digital converter for analog camcorders). You can do this on laptops, but it's a lot cheaper on desktops, hence the preference for desktops.

    The laptop listed above should do fine for editing IMO (you might want a bigger hard drive though-it'll fill up fast). You'd want to check to make sure it has the ports you need and that DVD+R will play on any standalone DVD players you'd want to use.

    The nice thing about a desktop would be that it'd cost about half as much for the same (or better) power. But if you need the small size, it's there if you spend enough.

    I don't know much about Macs.
     
  7. Bdnbrck

    Bdnbrck

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    Sorry if im trying to be a salesman... not my intention

    Laptops arent as easily upgraded as desktops. Most of the components are on board chipsets, meaning that the video and sounds chips reside directly on the motherboard.

    My feeling is that you should buy the best technology out at the time when considering a laptop, because once its functionality surpassed you end up with a paperweight. Better to extended that time, IMO.
     
  8. charlieschoice

    charlieschoice

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    Thanks for the input guys, I appreciate it.

    The one nice thing about this form of "information gathering" is I know you guys are not trying to sell me somthing.

    Let me be more speciffic on what I'm looking for.

    My "tapes" from my video usually are an hour long. All I want to do is "transfer" them from tape to dvd (in my terms, the cd thing that you play instead of the VHS). My limited understanding is that due to the lenght of tape, I need "alot" of memory to "store" it in the computer before I download it to DVD (or perhaps to edit it).

    I would however like to "title" the various "clips", and perhaps "rearrange" them as far as ocurrances or people.

    Wouldn't mind perhaps being able to play music with some clips as well.

    I bought a video camera last year after I had all of my parents super 8 film transfered to DVD by a company (it was well worth it for all the memories).

    Now I'm somewhat "hooked" on my Sony cam-corder, but everything I've recorded is on that "small tape" (mini dv).

    I'm not looking at getting into "professional video taping", but would like to be able to have alot of options when I "transfer" this tape to DVD.

    Again, thanks for the input, you've all given me a "starting point" to start looking.

    Bdnbrck, no, you didn't come across as a salesman:)

    Wicked96ss, what do you mean by "render the video"?
     
  9. RenegadeGlocker

    RenegadeGlocker

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    I use a HP Pavilion ze5270 (2.4 Ghz, 512MB-RAM, 40 GB disk). I paid $1200 for it 18 months ago, when it was pretty much top end.

    I hook up my Sony Mini-DV camcorder to the laptop via the Firewire port. I use Pinnacle Studio version 8. I can render 720x480x30fps no problem.

    EDIT to ADD:

    Here is a sample of what I can do:

    Suppressed Ruger

    Video is 720x480x30fps, 6 mbit data rate, 48 Khz Stereo sound. If you do not have drivers to play video, you may need Indeo XP for Windows drivers from Ligos
     
  10. charlieschoice

    charlieschoice

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    RenegadeGlocker, just so you know my computer "knowledge", the first thing that "poped" into my head as I was reading "720x480x30fps" was that you were talking about some really odd caliber's velocity;g

    Wicked96ss, the reason for a laptop is due to space for the time being. My wife works at home on the computer, and she has a "crapload" of things hooked up to the "main" computer. This computer was supplied by her company, and really isn't "set up" for any type of video work. Problem is that it's the only available space in the house to set up another computer, and there isn't any room.

    Although it may be just as "cost effective" to buy a small desk and buy a "desktop" computer for video editeting and put that computer in the bedroom. That's another possiblitly that I haven't thought of.
     
  11. Wicked96SS

    Wicked96SS Typical Gun Nut Millennium Member

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    Bdnbrck is right... if you are going to buy a laptop then you should get the best of what is available, just to keep it "more current" for longer... if you know what I mean.

    When I am talking about "rendering", usually up capture (put on the computer) clips of what you want to edit. YOu then edit it, and use a program (like video editing software) to create the freshly edited video into a format that you want.... depending on what you want to do with it (put it on the web, make a DVD, etc...).

    Have you tried calling around and paying for somebody to do that? There are several services out there that will do exactly what you want, and it woudl be cheaper than just buying a new computer to do it... especially a laptop.