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Venison question....

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by Cuse93, Oct 18, 2003.

  1. Cuse93

    Cuse93

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    Guys, I had a deer out all night in the woods I couldn't find til morning. Was out for about 14 hours in 50 degree weather and some light rain. Deer was very bloated when I found it and obviously stunk a little. But when I gutted it it looked fine. Still warm inside and blood flowed right out. Cut it up and meat looks and smells fine. Any rules of thumb I can use? What do you guys think? OK to eat? I'm pretty sure it is fine but this is the first time I've been unable to recover a deer until the next day and I tend to be a little paranoid. Thanks in advance, John
     
  2. Dadburn

    Dadburn Millennium Member

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    Just my opinion but I would let this one go.Being bloated and stinking would scare me away.
     

  3. DWavs

    DWavs Moderator Moderator

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    I agree.
     
  4. Skyhook

    Skyhook

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    An exception to the 'cologne leave it alone' rule.
    Bloated means a lot to us and vultures... it's the vultures' turn... Road kill in the woods.

    Helluva way to end a long trail, though. Better luck on the next.
    You care to tell us how come that one managed to drag itself all over town for that length of time??? How was it hit?
     
  5. vafish

    vafish

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    50 degrees is a little warm to leave it out all night.

    But I'll disagree with the above posts. Most of the smell and gas/bloating was from the intestines. If you can stand the smell of the meat it can't be too bad. Like any wild game (even domesticated animals really, but I like a rare steak) make sure you cook it well. Sure there is probably bacteria in it, but cooking it well will kill the bacteria. Be sure to take the usual precautions when handling the raw meat and don't prepare any other food on the same surface the raw meat was on until you disenfect it.

    I've had several deer that I shot which were gutted faster, but the meat was out in the same temperature for at least that long and I'm still here to talk about it.
     
  6. Cuse93

    Cuse93

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    I had 2 deer do this to me this weekend. The first, a decent 6 point I never found sadly enough. Ran down in a swamp. The second one (the subject of this post), was a big doe that spent the night out because I couldn't find it.

    Here is what happened:

    This was a muzzleloader hunt in Maryland. I hunt with a TC Black Diamond and good bushnell 4x scope. 2 pyrodex pellets and this year I switched to 240 grain copper hollowpoints (made by TC). They are the most accurate bullet I have ever shot out of the TC with groups of about 3" at 100 yds... and very flat shooting.

    Well....let me tell you how disappointed I am with these light sabots. Both deer were shot inside of 35 yards. I had a rock steady shot on both of them. Both ran like they weren't even it. And both NEVER BLED A SINGLE DROP OF BLOOD. It was pure luck I found the doe the next day. It was almost 300 yards from where I shot it. Right through the middle of the rib cage. The exit and entrance wounds were the size of a dime. Zero bullet expansion.

    As I said I never found the buck but I can only surmise a similar hit and situation. Unfortunately the buck ran into a swamp so I had no chance of finding him.

    Now mind you, I missed the heart and lungs on the doe but it got everything else in there and passed center mass through both rib cages. You would expect that a bullet would leave a decent exit wound with that type of hit wouldn't you?

    I've shot many deer with rifle and shotgun in this same spot... missing the heart and lungs but never have had a deer go more than 100 yards with a shot like that and always having a great big messy exit wound creating a blood trail I can follow.

    Next year I will definitely be switching bullets. Maybe a big 300 grain barnes expander or something but these light, hard, copper sabots were very disappointing. Very accurate, but very poor performers in my opinion.

    Sure, sure, I should have hit the heart on both of them at that range but I need to confess the god damn deer were both so close that you expect if you hit em in the chest with a 50 cal. sabot at that range they are going to drop. Didn't happen. Definitely a learning experience for me.

    I'm glad I found the doe because I was beginning to think I might have actually missed the deer completely.

    Moral of the story, shot placement should be considered critical regardless of the range or the weapon.
     
  7. skfullgun

    skfullgun

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    Well said,
    I had a similar situation with 150 grain, 30 cal. Remington Core-lokt bullets about 15 years ago. I hit a doe right in front of the shoulder (about 100 yards) and she never missed a step. I saw dirt kick up fifty yards behind her. I fired again...same thing.

    Long story short, she laid down after about 15 minutes and died in the field. Zero bullet expansion. Both bullets hit just in front of the shoulder and went through soft tissue with minimal damage.

    Shot placement is everything.