Velocity questions for 9mm

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by XDRoX, Feb 20, 2010.

  1. XDRoX

    XDRoX

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    I just bought a chronograph so I could actually start seeing what my rounds are doing. I'm very excited.

    But I know nothing about speeds, what good ones or bad ones are.

    Could someone please give me the low down on what I should be looking for. Are there dangerous levels at the high or low end? Any info would be great.

    Thanks
     
  2. Kentucky Jelly

    Kentucky Jelly

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    A chronograph is a load development tool. Not a check tool for if your load is safe or not. I am not sure what you load for, or what you are trying to accomplish with your loads. What made you purchase the chronograph?
     

  3. Boxerglocker

    Boxerglocker Jacks #1 Fan

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    Depends on the bullet you are using, you willl need to cross check with your manual data. Velocities are always listed.
    A 124g 9mm FMJ at 1200+ FPS is considered NATO velocity (+P) just as a point of reference.
    You really need to set a goal as to what you are trying to accomplish first, that being said provided you are within the safe published data range for a particular powder and bullet. Then at that time can you "play around" with different charges and/OAL to see what the effects will be on the chrono. Just make sure to watch for pressure signs on your spent cases closely if your pushing them close to max.
     
  4. rg1

    rg1

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    The most important thing is to NOT shoot your chronograph! Depends on what you are looking to do with your 9MM loads. A soft shooting load with 115 grain bullets would start around 950 fps and go up to around 1200 fps while 124 grain loads would be at 950 to 1150 feet per second. A 124 grain load at about 1050 fps shoots nicely in all my 9MM's. Also depends on the bullets you load whether they are lead, plated, or jacketed. Accuracy and 100% reliability are most important as well as safety.
     
  5. redstar

    redstar Live to shoot

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    As a rule of thumb, I load a 4 inch barrel to velocities not to exceed 1080. With a 124 gr flat nose, these cycle properly 99% of the time. I sometimes load to +p standards, but still do not cross 1160 with bullseye.
    Keep in mind you get different velocities with different guns and barrel lengths.
     
  6. XDRoX

    XDRoX

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    Thanks for the info Boxer:wavey:
    Are certain velocities more accurate than others? Should I be checking if my velocities match those in my manuals?
    It seems like right now I'm just "shooting in the dark."
    I have a bunch of different loads that I've tried, but I don't know the velocities that they are shooting at.

    Any other pertinent info would be great.
    Thanks
     
  7. XDRoX

    XDRoX

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    This is just the stuff I was looking for. Thanks guys, and keep your posts coming. I appreciate your knowledge.
     
  8. XDRoX

    XDRoX

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    Some more info if it helps.
    I'm loading with WST and Unique.
    115gr and 124gr TMJ RN.
     
  9. Kentucky Shooter

    Kentucky Shooter NRA Life Member

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    You need a good manual to get see what velocity to be expecting from your loads----then chronographing will see if they are in line with what they should be doing. The chronograph is most useful for spotting abmormalities. If you see an abnormally high velocity, you will know it needs investigated.

    I like to chronograph my rifle loads and plug the velocities into the Lee Shooter program. The ballistic calculator will allow you to calculate points of impact at whatever ranges you desire.

    You will enjoy your chronograph----every shooter needs one.
     
  10. redstar

    redstar Live to shoot

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    There is no such thing as an accurate velocity. All guns shoot slightly differently, and all shooters shoot differently, therefore unless you are putting your gun into a ranson rest, you would never know.
    Your best bet is to invest in a good scale and make sure you are throwing the correct powder weight. Sort brass by head stamp, size for length, set and lock dies, measure powder correctly, and seat bullet to correct length, and even low velocity will become accurate to the shooter.

    Give us some details as to what you are shooting, what powder you are using, and bullet including weight and shape.
     
  11. Zombie Steve

    Zombie Steve Decap Pin Killa

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    If you don't check what the barrel length was in the manual's test data, you'll drive yourself crazy. Make sure you're comparing apples and apples.
     
  12. Kentucky Jelly

    Kentucky Jelly

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    What are you looking to get out of your reloads that you are not getting now?
     
  13. fredj338

    fredj338

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    THis is very true. I had a friend buy a Chrony. He was tying to get the vel. in his manuals & overloading his 9mm, because he couldn't match the vel. in his G26! Very important to look at the data/book test platform & then your own pistols bbl length. Subtract roughly 50fps per inch & you should be in the ball park. A chronograph won't measure pressures, but you can see when pressures are increasing, like seating bullets deeper, as all things being equal, vel=pressure.
     
  14. Boxerglocker

    Boxerglocker Jacks #1 Fan

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    This is the key.... you can't get to where you want to go, unless you know where it is you want to be...

    The gun (barrel length) is very important as are the bullet, powder, OAL, etc. Like previously stated the chrono is just a tool to gather more data... in my case and many others it's assurance that a particular power factor is met specifically in the arena of gun games.

    For instance, my 124g FMJ loads with TG all chrono at 1050 fps consistently out of my G34, right at 130PF. In my G17 however they drop to about 128PF due to the shorter barrel length. That drop in PF may or may not necessarily be a factor depending on the match. But if I know I'm going to shoot the G17, I strive to use slightly bumped charges to make up for it and keep me in a safer range to make PF barring otherside conditions such as temperature and humidity.