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Value of "static address"

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by pascal, Jul 19, 2006.

  1. pascal

    pascal

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    Hey,
    Going to sign up for Bellsouth DSL and an option (for $14.99 ((a month))) is a static address. Ideal for home network, so THEY say!
    Will be eventually using on a WLAN. What does it mean and is it worth the expense?? Thanks for any insight into this question.
     
  2. ajkahr

    ajkahr

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    You only need a static address if you are going to be running a VPN back to your home or want to run some type of Inet server from your home. Even then, it's not 100% necessary.

    Go with the standard DHCP and GET A GOOD FIREWALL!

    Basically, if your traffic will be 100% outbound (you surfing the Net), don't get a static IP.
     

  3. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    A static IP isn't necessary if your only objective is to set up a home network. And, please don't take this personally, the fact that you're asking that question would indicate you don't have the geek quotient to make use of a static IP's unique assets. I'd save the money.
     
  4. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    ;) ;) ;)

    Obviously I'm mistaken, but I thought DSL was standard with a static IP? Isn't that basically a "Fixed" IP address, or am I confusing two different things?

    I know when I signed up for cable access, they tried hook me on a separate IPs because I told them I had 3 PC's and an XBox(I think it was around $15 each also). By then though, I'd read up enough on networking, etc, and knew a router would tackle any issues.

    You'll probably be fine w/o the static IP.

    IGF
     
  5. HVAC-TEK

    HVAC-TEK

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    Static address VS. Dynamic Addressing.

    This is simply two different ways that a network manager can distribute addresses. Both have good points and bad points. Both also have some area that it is primarily designed for.

    Dynamic addressing is the most common type of addressing. Dynamic simply means that your address expires every few days and must be renewed. This insures that the very valuable internet address is not being wasted on a computer that is not being used. It also makes it more difficult to abuse a system due to the changing addresses.

    Static addressing is simply a permanent address that does not expire or change. Static is used mainly by companies because the need to be able to find a specific location. For example an employee working from his computer at home is easier to connect to using a static address. Websites must use static addresses so that they can be located by the public. Imagine how difficult it would be if GlockTalks address changed every other day. It would be an update nightmare.

    Unless you telecommute by using a VPN, or run your own webpage/game server, you shouldn’t need a static address. As a matter of fact, having a static address could make you more vulnerable to troublemakers.

    K
     
  6. pascal

    pascal

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    you don't have the geek quotient to make use of a static IP's unique assets...
    I hold this truth to be self evident. Thanks for the answers.
    Now if someone can help with a dual boot W2K/Linux setup that works correctly with my computer.......................
    Thanks again
    pascal
     
  7. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    Do you have two hard drives in your PC or do you want to install Linux and Windows on one hard drive?I normally install Linux on a seperate drive.Before installing Linux I set the Linux drive as Master and the Windows drive is switched to Slave.when installing Linux I install the Linux bootloader on the master boot record of the Master(Linux) drive.Normally the Linux bootloader will recognize the Windows drive and automatically place the Windows option in the bootloader.This way the Linux bootloader doesn't overwrite the Windows boot loader on the Windows drive and I can dual boot both OS's.
     
  8. pascal

    pascal

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    Hello Washington,D.C.,
    I have a single 100gb drive. Ubuntu installed o.k.?? but it would not allow me to change the screen resolution from 640 X 480. So I tried an old copy of Fedora 2.0 over it. It did the resolution o.k but wouldn't see the soundcard, which old RH 9.0 did, but not the modem. Somewhere in the translation I squelched my operating system. When I manage to get W2K running again I give it another shot. Can you suggest a fairly easy distib that might see my hardware?? Maybe something I missed during the setups??
    pascal
    BTW Mille Graci!
     
  9. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    Okay,before you install Windows,partition the drive with a Linux CD.Make your Windows partition FAT 32 from the Linux CD as it won't have NTFS.You can reformat it in NTFS when you install Windows 2K.This will leave room for your Linux partitions without having to resize the Windows partition,which doesn't always work.

    Best hardware detection would be Mepis and PCLinuxOS.These are the easiest to install and use.The next Mepis should be released at the end of the month.The next version of PCLinuxOS is due sometime soon hopefully.The current version is getting a bit old but is a good one.The Ubuntu I tried is Xubuntu.Ubuntu doesn't have all of the plug-ins and hardware driver modules that Mepis and PCLinuxOS have pre-installed.


    Ubuntu is suppose to have long term support for the current version.The next version of Mepis will be based on Ubuntu.

    Blag Linux ia based on Fedora and Fedora doesn't work on my hardware very well but Blag does have the extras that are left out of the Fedora install CD's and is all on one CD.

    Updating the current Mepis has been causing a bit of trouble due to the changes in current Debian.The pre release of the next version is available.It seems fairly bug free and is Ubuntu based.I would say PCLinuxOS or Mepis would be the way to go.

    Now the fastest full featured Linux I've tried to date is an old version of Litrix.The sound doesn't always work but it has impressive speed for a complete desktop system.

    The newest Linux that impresses me is Sabayon.I am using the pre release mini version.It's based on Gentoo but may not be for everybody.


    Here is download link for the English version of Litrix.If your PC is newer than 2 or 3 years old it might not work.It is a bit dated.It's based on Slackware 10.0.It's a zip file.It must be unzipped before burning the CD.

    ftp://litrix.codigolivre.org.br/pub/litrix/Litrix-EX/Litrix-EX-iso/litrix-EX.iso.zip



    Sabayon CD link here


    http://www.lxnaydesign.net/downloads/RR4-Linux-3.0.RC1-miniEdition/RR4-Linux-3.0.RC1-miniEdition.iso
     
  10. pascal

    pascal

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    I think I'll have to wait until I get the DSL setup for the downloading. Currently hitting a brick wall with the reinstall of W2K. Can't get the install to run after an initial attempt. Will try that setup with Ubuntu and a blank partition for the windows. I shall return....
    pascal
     
  11. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    Dial up oky.Which Ubuntu do you have?The current Ubuntu 6.06 should be workable and is suppose to have long term support.
     
  12. pascal

    pascal

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    Yup, 6.06. I am thinking about swallowing my tongue as my attempts at partitioning are seemingly futile/ill-advised/wrong/horsehockey.
    pascal
     
  13. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    What I was saying about partitioning the drive ,is use the Linux install CD to partition the drive.Then install Windows 2K followed by installing Linux.
     
  14. pascal

    pascal

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    I managed to follow that far, it's the actual partitioning in Ubuntu that is causing me to search for my ColdSteel Trailmaster to end it's misery. Can't seem to figure out how to manually set it for hda1 as the FAT and making the unallocated 49.19GB into a boot/primary partition and a swap partition.
    pascal
     
  15. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    Okay.First you want to make only two partitions and none have to be bootable.You can use any Linux install CD for this it doesn't have to be the Ubuntu one.One of your others may or may not be easier.

    The first thing is to decide how much space you want each OS to have.Most likely larger for Windows.Make the Windows partition any FAT you can.You can change this later with the Windows CD.The other space only needs to be primary,Linux.Don't make bootable and don't have to make it ext3 and swap yet.Allow 1GB for swap partition.Just add this to how big you want Linux to be.

    When you install Windows 2K it will find the FAT partition and ask if you want it NTFS.When you install Ubuntu you can make file system and swap partition.It normally makes it bootable automatically during the installation.
     
  16. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    If your Linux install CD doesn't allow you to make a FAT 32 partition,then leave the space for Windows open or choose another parttition for Linux.Go ahead and install Linux.Log on as root and open a terminal and type "cfdisk" this will give you a good partitioning tool to format the windows partition.After installing Windows you can go again with the Linux CD if needed.
     
  17. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    When using cfdisk,delete the partition you want for Windows,this one won't have your Linux on it.Then choose "New",primary,Then choose "type" go through the numbered list choose the number that is FAT 32 or Windows.Don't make it bootable.Then choose "write".Answer yes and it will finish then choose "quit" then install Windows on that partition and you then make it NTFS with the Windows CD.
     
  18. pascal

    pascal

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    Hello Washington,D.C.,
    thank you for your perserverance. Couldn't get any linux I have to allow me to partitition properly. Finally managed to install NT4 on small partitions and then upgraded to W2K, which let me set up for 39 GB for windows and the rest for linux.
    If I give Ubuntu another install on the seperate partition, how hard will it be to remove for another distribution once I get it downloaded. Don't want to repeat yesterday's headaches. Thanks!!
    pascal
     
  19. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    How big is your hard drive again(I thought you said 100gb on another post)? 40gigs just doesn't seem like a lot for Win2k. I run XP, and have roughly 18gb of my 250gig drive in use (mostly due to a pretty large music/video collection). Linux should be able to run on a fairly small partition.

    If you really want Linux installed, I'd recommend picking up an additional hard drive on clearance. I found a 80gig hard drive on clearance online for around $40, partitioned it into into a 2gig swap, then made several 8-10gig Linux partitions. I've currently got PCLinuxOS, Ubuntu, and Mepis on that drive, and still have a few of the partitions left to try other versions of Linux should I ever get the itch..

    Good luck

    IGF
     
  20. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    Uninstalling Ubuntu shouldn't be difficult.Sometimes the Grub boot loader would cause problems when trying to overwrite it but this doesn't seem to be as much of a problem with recent releases.The Lilo bootloader doesn't have this problem.Grub and Lilo are Linux boot loaders.I wouldn't worry about it.Once you have Linux partitions it's easy to change.You can choose less of the hard drive for Linux and make it easier to get move space for Windows later.One of the very small Mandriva Linux network install CD's will even reinstall the Windows boot loader.This is not a huge download and can be done with dial up.