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Updated GSSF RO Guide Available

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by SARDG, Jun 25, 2012.

  1. SARDG

    SARDG

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    GSSF recently finalized and updated their RO Guide from the pre-2011, 8 page document to the now current 14 page document. There was an interim guide during the MajorSub Heavy Metal shakeup that was not officially released. Changes between the pre-2011 and the most recent, dated 04/01/12, are fairly significant.

    Some of the significant changes are listed below. For those who’ve never read any version, this may all be news. Some is generally covered in the rules; much is not.

    Of significance (and some are changes, some not):

    Page 3 (Squadding):
    The range officer will squad approximately eight (8) to twelve (12)
    priority-based entries per available stage set-up. New squads will be
    formed once the previous squad is down to their last one or two entries...


    [In the past, ‘excessive’ squadding numbers was defined as “12-16”]

    Page 3 (Reshoots):
    Reshoots. GSSF reshoot policies are much more lenient than those of
    other shooting venues. Everyone is allowed one “free reshoot” per
    stage. No matter the cause of a malfunction, whether bad ammo, “limp
    wristing”, or whatever
    .


    [The above more lenient reshoot paragraph reflects the changes being made and proffered during the 2012 Orlando match in February.]

    Page 4 (Reshoots):
    Range officers may grant reshoots in the case a non-recoverable scoring
    error is detected at the time scoresheets are reviewed and initialed.

    [This is not new, but should be noted.]

    Page 5 (Weather):
    Weather: If there is severe weather, GSSF will suspend or cancel the
    competition. As a general rule, if the interval between the “flash” and
    “bang” of lightning is 15 seconds or less, meaning that lightning is
    within about 3 miles of your location, competition should be suspended
    and all personnel should directed to shelters until the storm passes.


    [In the past, the ‘flash’ ‘bang’ interval was listed as 10 seconds and 2 miles.]

    Page 6 (GSSF Divisions):
    [Separate explanations regarding both MajorSub and Heavy Metal have been added]

    [A complete section regarding RO awareness of the differences in SubCompact, Heavy Metal, and MajorSub has been added including a paragraph better detailing the differences between MajorSub and SubCompact.]


    Page 6 (Reshoot Policy):
    IF THERE IS A MALFUNCTION FOR ANY REASON,
    INCLUDING RELOADED AMMO, “OPERATOR ERROR”,
    OR OTHER REASON
    , COMPETITOR GETS ONE
    RESHOOT.


    [‘Operator Error or Other Reason’ has been added here.]

    Page 7 (Sign-In Sheet RO – Squadding):
    Do not distribute scoresheets unless you are forming a new “squad” of
    approximately eight to twelve match entries. When not forming a new
    squad it is best to keep the supply of “blank” scoresheets out of sight
    and inaccessible to the competitors.


    [Again, reiterating a squad of up to 12 entries.]

    Page 10 (Start Positions):
    Start Position: Standing on the centerline of the target array, facing
    downrange in an accepted “ready” position. (Firearm held in hands with
    muzzle pointed into berm, no higher than parallel to the ground or lower
    with competitor’s forearms touching the torso. OR “Low Ready”; arms
    extended, gun pointing down at the ground at about a 45 degree angle.
    On start signal, gun is raised from the shoulders, not from the wrists.
    Prior to start signal, trigger finger must be outside the firearm’s trigger
    guard.


    [It needs to be noted here that there are two accepted ready positions and with ‘Low Ready’ the gun should point “down at the ground at about a 45 degree angle” and “gun is raised from the shoulders, not from the wrists.”]

    The complete document may be found here:
    http://www.gssfonline.com/pdf/range-officers/ro_guide.pdf

    -------------------------
    I can say that without a doubt, the two biggest single rule infractions – the ones most often seen – are ‘shooter starting with their finger on the trigger’ and ‘shooter starting from a disallowed ready position – frequently HIGH Ready'. Either one of these infractions saves several seconds per Division. Both combined… well.

    Kitty
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2012
  2. stak

    stak

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    Thank you for the notice on the update. I had not yet seen that myself. These are all beneficial changes.
     

  3. __jb

    __jb

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    Thanks for the RO rules update, Kitty...

    It reminded me about something I meant to ask about... Of the two acceptable starting positions, it seems that a large majority use the low ready starting position...

    I was wondering if the "forearms touching the torso" starting position might be better... It would give more of a chance to sight-in during the push out and also be more similar to a normal draw from a holster...

    Any thoughts?
     
  4. misunderestimated

    misunderestimated

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    Me personally use the compressed ready, Elbows touching abdomen as its a normal part of a draw from holster , Its more natural for me. Some times I may have a RO tell me to shoot from a low ready and I explain this is the other GSSF acceptable ready position would it be ok if I continue to use it. I have never had one say no to me yet.
     
  5. SARDG

    SARDG

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    My thoughts...
    The 'combat' ready (or whatever they're calling it today) was apparently introduced to GSSF around 2005. Before and since then the 'low-ready' has been acceptable.

    I'd say that the combat ready requires more muscle memory but shares movements with those required when coming out of a holster. LEOs and those who shoot disciplines where holster work is common likely prefer it.

    My issue as an RO comes when competitors (knowingly) s-t-r-e-t-c-h that 45 degrees in low-ready - some trying to start from 90 degrees, parallel to the ground - with arms extended. Some new competitors may not be familiar with the acceptable ready positions at all so a teaching moment by the RO is required. An orange or yellow cone or a painted orange X on the ground at the approximate 45 degree position can be used on each stage to reduce ambiguity and personal interpretation of the 45 degrees.

    A high-ready, and then coupled with a finger on the trigger is cheating and both or either should be corrected by the RO. 'Finger' violations may also inadvertently happen with new shooters - all the more reason for the RO to correct it. The most common safety violation in our NRA classes full of new shooters is 'finger'. Many new shooters seem incapable of keeping their finger off the trigger until the gun is on target and they are ready to shoot. Practice and muscle memory can correct that too.

    BTW, how does an RO catch 'finger' violations - by standing on the shooter's strong side AND watching the gun, NOT the targets. If a competitor shoots left-handed, the RO must move to that shooters left side. The Scorekeeping RO watches the targets during the shooting.
     
  6. triggerjerker

    triggerjerker

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    A high-ready, and then coupled with a finger on the trigger is cheating

    I have seen a few Masters starting at a very high ready.
     
  7. triggerjerker

    triggerjerker

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    Something that needs to be addressed is targets need to be hung correctly. A thrid of the targets I come across are on backwards. Painting a spot on the ground for the start position should be done a every stage to ensure a level playing field.
     
  8. SARDG

    SARDG

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    This is why the ROs must, know the rules and apply them equally and fairly. That is the most basic mantra for an RO. If we could get all GSSF ROs on the same page, at every match on the schedule, expectations would be that every shooter will be expected to follow the rules or expect to be corrected - and if blatently continuing with violations, be awarded a 10 second Procedural. Master shooters know better; ROs can work with new shooters who usually respond well. I look at intent.

    Woulda', coulda', shoulda'... yes; and there are printed guidelines for stage setup too. But it has been my experience that GSSF does not micro-manage basic stage setup AND many times the stages are already set by the time GSSF arrives on Friday mornings. The most important thing is that the stages are all set the same. GSSF stage setups are 'guidelines' and a great deal of latitude is given.

    GSSF ROs, being volunteers, are found with varying degrees of experience. For some it is almost muscle memory that puts the targets up facing forward. For others, that's the farthest thing from their mind. It's nice when everything is equal on a setup - but it probably shouldn't be a deal-killer for a shooter. If a competitor is out pasting, painting, resetting, they can watch for that on an ongoing basis. As a shooter, I watch new target placement; as an RO I try to review each new target that's placed on my stage.

    I also square them up with the target behind. If one target is clipped 1" to the right, and the next target placed on top again and clipped 1" (or even more) to the left, the shooter is presented with a target picture that is 2" wider than the original D-1 so point shooting to a far target can be problematic. 2" isn't a scoring difference between an A and a B of course, but can easily make the difference between a B and C hit - or even a D and Mike.

    And yes, it would be a simple matter for GSSF to throw some small cones in the back of the truck and bring those. Plan B of painting an X is an alternative.