Glock Talk banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
18,795 Posts
FWIW, the Trigger Spring isn't the Trigger Reset Spring. It actually works against the reset process. The firing pin spring is what resets the trigger.

The Trigger Spring is the most frequent part on the Glock to break. Keep one and a punch in your range bag and you are covered for six sigma events when it comes to Glock failures. Or just change all your springs at say 20K round intervals. :)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
18,795 Posts
Thank you for catching that. I have no idea why I typed “ trigger reset spring” as I know that’s not what it is. I correctly called it just the trigger spring from that point on and in other posts...no idea where that came from.
I think we all do the misnomer thing when we are slamming along typing in a stream of thought, less focused on names than what happened. When I see it, I just point it out so the less informed maybe get a more complete picture. Glad you got it sorted.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
18,795 Posts
Thank you. So...is there a down side to this?
To me it is personal preference. The conventional trigger spring helps lessen trigger weight. When you put a NY trigger in, the tab on top presses on the underside of the cruciform creating a little drag on the trigger bar, so you not only don't have the help of the normal trigger spring, but have the added drag of the NY bit. A lighter spring in the NY trigger just exerts less upward pressure and feels more like a trigger without the normal trigger spring (less drag), a heavier spring in the NY trigger bit increases upward pressure, hence more drag.

The good thing about the NY trigger spring is without the normal trigger spring (that can break), you don't have as much countering pressure against reset, so reset feel is more positive, snappier. That means a lot to some people.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top