Unrepentent Sinner

Discussion in 'The Book Rack' started by The Goose, May 27, 2005.

  1. The Goose

    The Goose

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    This is the autobiography of the hunting and firearms writer Col. Charles Askins. I grew up reading this guys stuff and developed a great admiration for him. He hunted all over the world, a great marksman with any type of weapon and a truly colorful individual. I picked up this book ready to love it. However, it is one of the toughest reads I have ever gotten through. The man is unrepentent alright. He is an unrepentent bigot, bully and generally nasty individual. His defenders have said that he was a great guy who came from a different time, but certain values are timeless and I just cannot agree.

    I can respect his truthfulness in relating an unvarnished history of his life, but that is about it. Be clear that I am a conservative, avid shooter and not in the least bit faint of heart, but this guy represents the kind of arrogant abuse of authority that is at the darkest heart of this country.

    He relates a story of when he was a forest ranger in the late 20's or early 30's and was responsible for an area adjacent to an Indian reservation. He goes out to get some Indians that he believes are butchering Indian agency calves and selling them back to the agency. He comes upon three of them butchering a calf and shoots all three of their horses, then goes and gets help and captures the three indians and turns them over to the agency. Howver, around the same time he describes how he kills Indian owned horses to feed his hunting dogs. Describing how he kills the horse then looses his dogs and guts open the horse for them to feed. He is incredulous when the horses owners, "greasy haired Indians", take issue with his actions.

    In other chapters he describes working the border patrol and again describes his joy in shooting down "greasers" who attempt to smuggle liqour over the border during prohibition. He also describes holding up a local bootlegger and stealing a gallon of home made shine so that he and his buddies can get drunk. When the bootlegger takes issue and fires a shotgun blast at him he recounts his anger and desire to kill the man as he empties his revolver at him.

    It just goes on and on. Algerians are "****s". Anyone who does not agree with him is cowardly, stupid and lazy. Other shooting competitors can't shoot, even if they best him. This is a man who literally killed people, especially non-whites, who violated even minor laws and yet bent or broke many laws to suit his desires.

    I have never been so disillusioned over someones true character before. I read the book, but was troubled throughout the reading. The fact that he is unrepentent is not admirable, but deeply disturbing.
    __________________
     
  2. RiverVan

    RiverVan FREEDOM

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    I have never read the book, however I have read other writes who feel the same way you do. Personally, no matter how great some of his life was he was a murder in my eyes. He shot people on numerous occasions for no reason, even when they were retreating, or unarmed.
     

  3. lowflash

    lowflash

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    Charles Askins made no excuses and never asked for approval or forgiveness by you or I. Askins was probably no more or less bigoted than a certain percentage of the population of that time period.

    His actions never culminated in prosecution of criminal charges against him. There would be little doubt in his Border Patrol career that his fellow officers gave tacit approval of his conduct. Supervising authority may have chosen to look the other way.

    As for his military career apparently his behavior was not negatively noted by superiors and appears to be within the bounds of accepted conventions. He was not of WestPoint but his accent to full colonel is not to be over looked in a post WII Army that was dramatically down sized.

    This is in no way to be construed has a defense of Askins.

    Askins is not to be praised but he is to be studied as a brutally effective practitioner in the art of lethal encounters.

    In closing no one chose to speak publicly about Askins dark side until after his death.
     
  4. V Creed

    V Creed Been there!

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    I have read "Unrepentant Sinner" several times, and liked it a lot. But I have to admit that it probably isn't something that liberal sheep would like.

    Charlie was my kind of guy. And his life story is a fascinating read.
     
  5. prairieviper

    prairieviper

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    People who commit criminal acts are not and will never be, "my kind of guy."
     
  6. V Creed

    V Creed Been there!

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    That's interesting, considering you are from IL, where otherwise lawabiding non-residents passing through with firearms in the cabs of their PU's are committing "a criminal act".

    Three weeks ago I went to my son's wedding in Chicago and felt like I was in a foreign police state. Leaving there was the only time I have ever been happy to pay road tolls.

    Any so-called "officer" who would enforce IL/Chicago type unAmerican gun laws isn't "my kind of guy". So I guess we'll have to agree to disagree about Charlie.
     
  7. prairieviper

    prairieviper

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    If your attitude when you were a police officer was to pick and choose what laws you enforced and you condone some of "Charlie's" actions that were described in his book,you wouldn't have been my kind of police officer either. Sorry you don't like our state but opinions vary. Maybe staying west of the Mississippi will cause you less stress in the future.
     
  8. V Creed

    V Creed Been there!

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    Are you a mindless robot-cop who enforces every law 100%, regardless of whether or not enforcement unjustly destroys the lives of good honest American citizens? If so, you need to understand what "zero tolerance" really is, namely, total control of the police by liberal politicians.

    Did I pick and choose which laws to enforce? Yes, and so did all the other cops I worked with. Why? Because we were more interested in JUSTICE, than abusive arrests. Of course, back then "zero tolerance" was still just a pipe-dream of liberal politicians, like your corrupt Governor.

    You can be assured that I won't be back in IL any time soon. The only reason I went this time was my son's wedding, and he he understands that I won't be back.
     
  9. prairieviper

    prairieviper

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    I guess I would wonder why, if you are a retired police officer, you would need a carry permit in Illinois or anywhere else. H.R. 218, the “Law Enforcement Officers’ Safety Act”,
    exempts qualified active and retired law enforcement officers from local and state prohibitions on the carrying of concealed firearms across state lines.

    I suppose we will have to disagree on what being a police officer is about. While far from mindless, I realize that law enforcement doesn't always result in justice. Still, it is not my place to substitute my judgement in lieu of the law or for that of the courts.

    In any case, good luck and enjoy your retirement.
     
  10. V Creed

    V Creed Been there!

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    I never said I was a retired LEO. I made what I thought was a lot of money in Florida real estate while a cop, and got out early. Retired at age 36 on my own money, not the PD's. Never regretted it.

    My beautiful, sexy, younger wife recently took an early retirement from her US Gov position and we've been having a blast ever since in America (not IL).

    All the best and watch your six! (And think about moving to America when you retire.) :cool: