close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Turkey Dispersment?

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by duncan, Dec 24, 2002.

  1. duncan

    duncan Lifetime Member Millennium Member

    Messages:
    2,348
    Likes Received:
    75
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 1999
    Location:
    Seattle
    Good friend at church quietly asked me if I hunted turkey. He knew I do. bBen talking turkey hunting with him for years.

    Said he spotted a flock of 20 plus birds on him mother's property near Spokane WA. Yeah! Private property and it's his mom's place;)

    Maybe even a warm bed to sleep in!!!

    I'm going to confirm that I can take a hunt out that way in the spring. Buddy's a duck hunter but maybe some turkey for him?

    I've never gotten several months intell on birds like that. Do they travel more than a couple miles? thought they stuck to a territory unless a lot of hunting pressure moved them.

    What's the deal?
     
  2. CanyonMan

    CanyonMan In The Saddle

    Messages:
    5,712
    Likes Received:
    26
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2002
    Duncan,

    Hey Hoss, I can tell you that in almost 30 years of guiding,.... turkey, has been one of the greatest experiences.... I love it. Especially in spring. Let's look at some things here. (i got nothing else going on right now :)

    His "mom" has a flock on her land! That is good. But remember this. Usually the birds that are always seen on the 'same ole place, stay on the same ole place'. what i mean is this. I'm not saying they never wander around," they do. They will come off the roost in the morning,(and that could be on someone else's place, then they may feed or 'travel through,' your friends place on their way to another place.. make since?

    Or, they may 'roost' on your friends place, and still travel to another place to feed.... several senerio's here. (since i am not there), i'm sorta touching all the bases before i get to the point.

    In all these years, it has been my experience, that turkeys 'do not' change their roosting habits much, "unless," they are regularally,(sp), spooked from said roost spot, by men, or fury predators.

    So, this means good news for you, if this "has not happened there."

    Also, sometimes, they will change their roost habits, from winter to spring, but usually come back to approx: the same place 'each season change,'(given that food supply has not drastically changed). Also, they 'can,' sorta get a wild itch to just 'pop up' in said tree at evening if they have been doing some real heavy mating, and it is getting dark, and a long ways back to the normal roost.. and, if there is heavy hunting pressure, they can vanish like a puff of smoke... But, all in all, they will keep pretty regular habits, generation, after generation, for years, and years....

    If you can find the 'roost,' this is good. set up about 50 yards or so from it, in a real likely looking "landing spot," for when they will come off in the moring. Usually in a small open area, meadow, or small open grassy area, etc.. They will land there, and scratch, and peck around for a few minutes, then, they will slowly head for the food source, and do their 'mating thing,' for the day. If it is spring, and the 'peak' of the mating time, they will hang around a little longer after landing, and usually not stray to aweful far, and the gobblers will 'strut their stuff for the ladies... then they will move on.

    smaller jakes will most generally hang with the older hens, or in a small group among themselves, and the big boys will also run with like kind as well. (sometimes even with a hen or two tagging along).

    Kind of a bottom line for ya is this.. even if you do not find the roost... get out there before sunup, hoot like an owl..(you don't even have to be good at it), or buy an owl hooter, an let loose with it before sun up. The gobblers will "gobble" and give away their position to you. "head that way," quitely, and set up about 50/60 yards from them. (don't think they can't see ya), so be careful...

    get in some brush, and good camo, and if you can use a call, call very softly a couple of times, (no more), and not to often, and make it a soft purring/smooth yelping/clucking type combo. "don't over do it"! (do this, just as it is getting light).

    if you got decoys this will help.. if not, hang tight.. when you hear those wings flap, and they land.. wait a few minutes, and begin to yelp, and "cutt," if you have not done this before (i don't know), then,just at least give a series of yelps...remember, they "may" have hens in the same tree, or, on the ground, so they are more interested in them, than you.. (whom they cannot see).

    but, be patiently persistent, and lure big boy to you out of curiosity alone!....

    If they go "the other way," .. 'our method is this..'

    The, "cut them off at the pass method"... (or, stalking method). make a big, 'quite' circle around them, and set up, and call again. You will most generally bring at least one to you, with some patients. (remember, if you did this correctly, they will be walking right into you.. and they got great eyes for seeing even your pulse rate!).

    BTW..(this is all given that you are using a shotgun, or bow)..
    If using a rifle and scope, (where legal), you can pick one off from a greater distance, and ignore "some" of the above info.

    If all this fails.... wait till evening, set up 50/60 yards from where they were gobbling and roosting that morning, and then call again, about 45 minutes before sundown, again, 'do not over do it'.

    If you follow these very basic, and simple guidelines, you should get your bird.

    There are other ways as well, the 'walk around and call during the midday hours', until you get a "gobble," then head that way, set up call, wait, etc... . This is one of my favorites, and works great, if you do your part! Remember; this method can make or break you sometimes, depending on the country side your hunting in.

    Here in the west, where we have lots of canyons, and sage, and woods running in the bottom of the canyons, surrounded with tons of cactus and mesquite,and bolders, and tall hills with scattered cedar trees on them, visibility is greater, than say, the terrian of the piney woods of Tenn: (where i just hunted on my uncles for thanksgiving, for a big "Eastern" brand bird). So, nuturally, stalking methods will differ somewhat.

    I am confident, that if there is a flock on that land, (your friends), 'undisturbed', you will get a bird with these methods.... We do get 'far more technical', with some of our more 'difficut hunts'.. but the above info, has worked, on a basic since, for years, and we have "never" guided one person yet, that has not gotten a bird... (although, for some weird reason, every now and then I don't get mine! :(

    Can they change like the wind? YES!... but, "given the conditions are undisturbed", And you are on a patch of ground with regularally seen birds there... you should be confident, have fun, and get a bird.

    Well, HTH !!

    A jillion other ways, and situations... but, these will work for ya, without going into greater detail...

    Good hunting, have fun, and enjoy those drumsticks! :)

    CanyonMan
     

  3. duncan

    duncan Lifetime Member Millennium Member

    Messages:
    2,348
    Likes Received:
    75
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 1999
    Location:
    Seattle
    Thanks for the tips.

    I've almost always hunted public land "waiting" for them birds to fly down from the roost or catch them heading for food in the morning.

    But never a resident flock.

    Let you know in ther spring. Probably go up two days before season starts to get intell on roosting trees and so forth.

    Turky hunting in Eastern Washington State is a big deal and many farmers refuse to let Seattle hunters hunt "their" turkeys on their farms.

    Thanks.
     
  4. CanyonMan

    CanyonMan In The Saddle

    Messages:
    5,712
    Likes Received:
    26
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2002
    Duncan,

    Sounds like you are blessed to get that place then!
    we are fixed, as far as hunting land goes, and "all" private, always has been. But i do know that it is getting harder all the time for guys to get on good private land. It is usually, the guys that shoot holes in everything you got, and kill your calves, or litter up the land, or drive through your plowed fields, that mess it up for the 'real hunters."!

    Hope to hear a good report in the spring.

    Have a great Holiday my friend. be safe!

    CanyonMan