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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would have loved to have the extra forward mass of a G48 but didn't want the extra length for carry. I noticed that when I put a TLR-6 light on my 43x it really softens the felt recoil. But I'm not sure that I want to carry all the time with the light and may even add a tungsten rod to add mass to the front end to get closer to the feel of a G48 and get some additional recoil control.

Can the tungsten guide rod help making the 43x less snappy and more controllable? Any idea how that stacks up against the DPM guide rod or if the DPM is superior as they are the same price?

TIA
 

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Two things.

Any extra “weight” on your pistol will proportionally assist in absorbing felt recoil.

The further forward this weight is helps to keep the “nose” down……

….. so hanging a light on the rail or a tungsten guide rod will help in reducing muzzle flip. So will a weighted stand/off device or a weighted ( slide on compensator).
It’s just a question of how much / if it’s enough for you.
 

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I don't own a tungsten guide rod for the 43/48, but I do have the DPM guide rod for the G48 (which also fits the 43 and 43X), and I can say there was noticeable reduction in both muzzle flip and felt recoil. I would lean toward getting a DPM. Tungsten is only reducing muzzle flip, the DPM doubles in that it can also reduce felt recoil, and the spring will also last significantly longer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't own a tungsten guide rod for the 43/48, but I do have the DPM guide rod for the G48 (which also fits the 43 and 43X), and I can say there was noticeable reduction in both muzzle flip and felt recoil. I would lean toward getting a DPM. Tungsten is only reducing muzzle flip, the DPM doubles in that it can also reduce felt recoil, and the spring will also last significantly longer.
You may have pushed me into the DPM. I can get one from optics planet which is semi-local. Unfortunately Glockstore’s return policy isn’t very friendly nor is their promptness or customer phone support.
 
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You may have pushed me into the DPM. I can get one from optics planet which is semi-local. Unfortunately Glockstore’s return policy isn’t very friendly nor is their promptness or customer phone support.
I see OpticsPlanet has the DPM for the 43 (also 43X/48) listed for $69.99, and that is probably the best price you could find for one of these. I think I paid $90-something for mine last year. They are very good and quite solid. I haven't had any failures from it. It can be a chore to get installed at first, especially the longer spring that comes with it, but once it's in there I left the slide locked back for a few days and then hand cycled it a couple hundred times to break it in, and it has been flawless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I just ordered a DPM. With store credit ships for $66. GS would have been almost $100 w tax and shipped for the tungsten rod.

I see OpticsPlanet has the DPM for the 43 (also 43X/48) listed for $69.99, and that is probably the best price you could find for one of these. I think I paid $90-something for mine last year. They are very good and quite solid. I haven't had any failures from it. It can be a chore to get installed at first, especially the longer spring that comes with it, but once it's in there I left the slide locked back for a few days and then hand cycled it a couple hundred times to break it in, and it has been flawless.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I see OpticsPlanet has the DPM for the 43 (also 43X/48) listed for $69.99, and that is probably the best price you could find for one of these. I think I paid $90-something for mine last year. They are very good and quite solid. I haven't had any failures from it. It can be a chore to get installed at first, especially the longer spring that comes with it, but once it's in there I left the slide locked back for a few days and then hand cycled it a couple hundred times to break it in, and it has been flawless.
Are you advocating for using the longer spring? How does one decide?
 

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Are you advocating for using the longer spring? How does one decide?
I would go with the standard weight/length spring. They give you a metal ring washer that fits in the slide, plus the guide rod and two springs in the package; one standard length and another longer one for extra power which is just a heavier weight spring. I have found the standard length spring to work just fine with all ammo including +P defensive ammo. Just depends what you want to shoot, if you intended to run a steady supply of +P or other hot ammo through it, the longer spring could be used but I really found it not necessary as even with the standard length spring there is still a noticeable reduction in felt recoil and snap with hot ammo. Most of what I put through my G48 is basic 115gr ball or JHP, and occassional 115gr or 124gr +P plus whatever SD ammo I have opted for, mostly 115gr +P gold dots or 124gr HST, and I find the standard length spring works fine.
 

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Glock was based around 124 grain 9mm NATO, specialized recoil springs aren't necessary. More training and a better grip possibly, but equipment, no.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

If you don't like the recoil of the 43X buy something bigger period, I like my 48 but Im buying a G19 because I feel that I can shoot better with the 19 period. small handguns are great for CC but in my case if ever comes the time to protect myself I want to be as effective as possible and to place rounds on target, small handgun are challenging to deliver that.
 

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I would have loved to have the extra forward mass of a G48 but didn't want the extra length for carry. I noticed that when I put a TLR-6 light on my 43x it really softens the felt recoil. But I'm not sure that I want to carry all the time with the light and may even add a tungsten rod to add mass to the front end to get closer to the feel of a G48 and get some additional recoil control.

Can the tungsten guide rod help making the 43x less snappy and more controllable? Any idea how that stacks up against the DPM guide rod or if the DPM is superior as they are the same price?

TIA
Won’t do a bit of good. The physics of recoil and muzzle rise cannot be overcome by a heavier RSA. Proper grip, and lots of practice, are the only reliable solutions. IMHO.
 

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The mechanical action of a semiautomatic handgun operates reliably within a set of pre-defined specifications and conditions. It is assumed by the manufacturer that the pistol will be operated within those specifications and conditions. When the pistol is operated under conditions outside of those intended by the manufacturer, or utilizing parts that are not part of the intended specifications, it is possible, if not likely, for the function of that pistol to become less reliable.

I am sure that many will recall the problems that the .40 Glock 22 pistols were having when equipped with weapon mounted lights. Now, I am no mechanical engineer, but it seems reasonable to consider that Glock rushed their .40 S&W pistols to market in an effort to beat Smith & Wesson to the punch. When looking at the model 22 compared to the model 17, it is apparent that Glock did little more than fit a model 17 with the appropriate barrel and a couple of small parts to accommodate the .40 S&W.

The result appears to have been that the .40 S&W has operating characteristics that are just enough different than those of the 9mm, that when a weapon mounted light was used on the .40 pistols, it could have a negative impact upon the reliable operation of those guns. Perhaps it affected the speed at which the slide recoiled, or some other minor change in the mechanical operation of the pistol, but whatever it was... it was a real issue that impacted a lot of users.

My point here, is that a pistol requires certain conditions to exist in order to function. When an end user alters the design of that pistol by changing out parts, or adding accessories, it has an effect on the mechanical operation of that pistol. Perhaps those changes still fall within the acceptable range of tolerances for reliable operation, but then again, perhaps they don’t. I personally agree with the poster who said that if the recoil characteristics of a particular model are not comfortable for you, it would be wise to select a different model altogether.

I am sure that the folks who designed the G43X are aware of the fact that it exhibits a bit more recoil than larger/heavier pistols, and that consumers would love for it to be a bit softer shooting. They likely explored the idea of adding heavier springs/guide rods, and other parts to help tame recoil, but through a combination of their testing/education/experience, they decided that the pistol functions most reliably with the parts they sent it out the door equipped with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The mechanical action of a semiautomatic handgun operates reliably within a set of pre-defined specifications and conditions. It is assumed by the manufacturer that the pistol will be operated within those specifications and conditions. When the pistol is operated under conditions outside of those intended by the manufacturer, or utilizing parts that are not part of the intended specifications, it is possible, if not likely, for the function of that pistol to become less reliable.

I am sure that many will recall the problems that the .40 Glock 22 pistols were having when equipped with weapon mounted lights. Now, I am no mechanical engineer, but it seems reasonable to consider that Glock rushed their .40 S&W pistols to market in an effort to beat Smith & Wesson to the punch. When looking at the model 22 compared to the model 17, it is apparent that Glock did little more than fit a model 17 with the appropriate barrel and a couple of small parts to accommodate the .40 S&W.

The result appears to have been that the .40 S&W has operating characteristics that are just enough different than those of the 9mm, that when a weapon mounted light was used on the .40 pistols, it could have a negative impact upon the reliable operation of those guns. Perhaps it affected the speed at which the slide recoiled, or some other minor change in the mechanical operation of the pistol, but whatever it was... it was a real issue that impacted a lot of users.

My point here, is that a pistol requires certain conditions to exist in order to function. When an end user alters the design of that pistol by changing out parts, or adding accessories, it has an effect on the mechanical operation of that pistol. Perhaps those changes still fall within the acceptable range of tolerances for reliable operation, but then again, perhaps they don’t. I personally agree with the poster who said that if the recoil characteristics of a particular model are not comfortable for you, it would be wise to select a different model altogether.

I am sure that the folks who designed the G43X are aware of the fact that it exhibits a bit more recoil than larger/heavier pistols, and that consumers would love for it to be a bit softer shooting. They likely explored the idea of adding heavier springs/guide rods, and other parts to help tame recoil, but through a combination of their testing/education/experience, they decided that the pistol functions most reliably with the parts they sent it out the door equipped with.
I appreciate the detailed information and take it seriously. The only issue I have in this is that it is Glock and in this case a 43x and 48 built on the same platform with many of the same internal components. The main exceptions seem to be the slide and barrel, which add mass to the front end of where the 43x leaves off. I would have to imagine that if both the 43 slide and 48 slide function equally well with the same parts, no difference in springs or (I think) the same guide rod, would the extra mass of a tungsten rod be any different and the extra ounces of the 48 slide/barrel over the 43x? I know that with a 1.3 ounce light has made no difference in function and only made the 43x a little softer shooting, and the reports of others who have had success with the DPM that it is worth a try.

I've said over and over that any time one introduces a 3rd party component it warrants extensive testing before being deemed reliable for carry. In my area, of all the guys I know that carry I know of nobody that has ever had to draw their pistol for self defense. Most of carry because it's better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it [though entities in power would have us not carry in places most vulnerable (figure that one out)]. I anticipate several hundred rounds with the DPM installed before carrying with it installed. The beautiful thing about Glock is that it is so easy and fast to swap parts, unlike something like a 1911 which is a pain to even clean.

I have the DPM coming from Optics Planet which will take it back if I don't like it, so it will get tested to make sure it was a decent investment. We'll see. Thanks again for the very well explained information.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

If you don't like the recoil of the 43X buy something bigger period, I like my 48 but Im buying a G19 because I feel that I can shoot better with the 19 period. small handguns are great for CC but in my case if ever comes the time to protect myself I want to be as effective as possible and to place rounds on target, small handgun are challenging to deliver that.
At this moment I'm ok with the 43x, especially with a TLR-6 on it, though the light makes it a little more uncomfortable for carry, though it does soften the recoil a bit. I don't really want a larger pistol, but at some point I may get one when I get bored. Maybe a G19, or a CZ P-10C or an Arex Delta M. I don't know. But at this time I want to see how something like a DPM might make the 43x a better all-around pistol, which is what I'm looking for without going bigger if possible. Will the DPM help? I don't know. If it doesn't it will be returned. But I'm the curious sort. We'll see.
 

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I appreciate the detailed information and take it seriously. The only issue I have in this is that it is Glock and in this case a 43x and 48 built on the same platform with many of the same internal components. The main exceptions seem to be the slide and barrel, which add mass to the front end of where the 43x leaves off. I would have to imagine that if both the 43 slide and 48 slide function equally well with the same parts, no difference in springs or (I think) the same guide rod, would the extra mass of a tungsten rod be any different and the extra ounces of the 48 slide/barrel over the 43x? I know that with a 1.3 ounce light has made no difference in function and only made the 43x a little softer shooting, and the reports of others who have had success with the DPM that it is worth a try.

I've said over and over that any time one introduces a 3rd party component it warrants extensive testing before being deemed reliable for carry. In my area, of all the guys I know that carry I know of nobody that has ever had to draw their pistol for self defense. Most of carry because it's better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it [though entities in power would have us not carry in places most vulnerable (figure that one out)]. I anticipate several hundred rounds with the DPM installed before carrying with it installed. The beautiful thing about Glock is that it is so easy and fast to swap parts, unlike something like a 1911 which is a pain to even clean.

I have the DPM coming from Optics Planet which will take it back if I don't like it, so it will get tested to make sure it was a decent investment. We'll see. Thanks again for the very well explained information.
Excellent point regarding the shared parts between the G43X and the G48. In light of that, I would say that you are most likely correct in assuming that the slight weight difference is unlikely to present a problem. I know that my G43X runs well as it sits, but have never fired a G48 although I would assume that those run well also. Perhaps the design of both pistols leaves enough wiggle room in the tolerances to accommodate some added weight without sacrificing reliability.

As for whether or not you’ll ever need to use your pistol for defense, let’s hope you don’t. Still, it is unwise to allow yourself to become complacent. I spent 20 years as an LEO, and although the vast majority of cops will never find themselves in a situation where they need their guns, I was not so fortunate. The fact is that nobody who ever needed their pistol, thought that they really would need their pistol...until they needed their pistol.

My experience changed my entire thought process regarding a handgun from looking at them as an awkward, mildly uncomfortable piece of equipment that I was required to pack around but unlikely to ever use, into viewing them as possibly the single most important item that I carried.

Even in retirement, I see my pistol as a “must have” item. I also see it more as my primary defensive tool, rather than as a backup piece because it is the weapon I am most likely to have in my possession if I need to defend my life. As such, I tend to do all that I can to ensure that my pistol is as reliable as it can be, and for me at least, that includes keeping it in its factory configuration.

Enjoy your G43X. It is an excellent handgun.
 

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Another vote for the DPM system.
I do not have any experience with the tungsten rod, but I use the DPM system in all of my Glocks now. When shooting 124gr +P rounds from the small G43 one-handedly, I can really feel the reduction in felt recoil and muzzle jump. (FWIW, I always use the longer outer spring in the G43.)

Another advantage of the DPM system is that one unit can last a long time and many rounds. In my experience, one DPM system in G43 can last up to 9K to 10K rounds, depending on how many +P/+P+ and NATO spec ammo you shoot. So, you are basically paying only 1¢ a round, which is not bad at all despite the seemingly very high “per unit” cost. I believe it should work the same way in the G43X.
 
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Can the tungsten guide rod help making the 43x less snappy and more controllable?
Replying to the OP, just to add some data:

Yes.

I had a G43X for about 600 rounds. It was pretty snappy, so I purchased a Tungsten Guide Rod from the Glockstore. Weighing both showed a net increase of 0.7 oz over OEM. Perceived recoil was softer, reducing split times. I ended up deciding the G43X wasn't a good match for me, so I ended up selling it.

Yes, it has an effect, but whether it's worth the cost would be up to the user and his or her perception of benefit. I do like the concept, though; I used a Tungsten RSA for my CO Glock 34 Gen 5 MOS in USPSA the last two years.

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