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Trigger not getting any better Gen4

1139 Views 18 Replies 15 Participants Last post by  maestro pistolero
First off, this isn't a Gen4 bashing thread. I REALLY like the way the Gen4 feels and shoots in every way except for the trigger. It's not as smooth or as light as my Gen3 I traded in, in reality it's quite gritting and heavy. I've read about putting Gen3 triggers in but I can't seem to find those threads anymore. I just want my Gen4's trigger to feel like my old Gen3, then it will be back to Glock Perfection.
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Part of the reason that the Gen4 trigger pull feels heavier is that the angle at which the connector sits in the trigger housing was changed by 5 degrees in the heavier direction. A "dot" aka "Gen4" connector should bring the weight down pretty close to Gen3 standard weight.

Another reason the Gen4 trigger pull is heavier is the bump on the firing pin safety camming arm of the trigger bar. Some people have ground that bump down, but I wouldn't recommend modifying any existing part in your gun. If you do it, buy a spare and modify the spare that way if you have any problems with it you still have an unaltered one that will work.
Here's a video where Brandon401401 shows a trigger bar that he ground the bump off of mostly. I wouldn't grind it down all the way because it will leave a hole in the trigger bar, just a good portion of the way:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mj8Qt8ofCAw

And the third reason the trigger pull is heavier is that the kickup "sear" portion of the trigger bar that engages the firing pin lug was raised to have more engagement with the firing pin lug.

You can solve the last two I mentioned by using a Gen3 9/40 trigger bar, Glock manufacturer part# 357 for the smooth-faced trigger version.
 

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If you are carrying it for defense, I'd think long & hard before I altered the trigger. Maybe a drop in like a NY-1, but I wouldn't carry a trigger altered by grinding, it could lead to a lot of legal trouble if you were unfortunate enough to have to use your gun for defense.
Some may not agree, but that's my rule.
Frank
 

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In my last recert class earlier this year, it was mentioned that the "current" trigger pull on a typical Glock will probably be running in the 5 1/2 - 6 lbs range. Maybe a tad more in a particular gun.

Even though the Gen4 guns aren't approved for CA commercial sales (being a new model and not having a magazine safety), they're the models being promoted to LE/Gov users here.

Personally, since I happen to prefer my "working" 1911's have triggers running in the 5 - 6 lbs range, I don't have any issue with Glock triggers running in that range, either.

Trigger pull weight, in itself, can sometimes be deceptive, though. At least hard to determine by sheer "feel" when shooting.

I recently installed one of the newest sear housings in a M&P 40c (being a MA-compliant housing with the large sear plunger & spring) and was doing some shooting with it during a couple of range sessions, mixed in with some other guns. At one point, after having been shooting my G27 (not a Gen4), I switched to the 40c and found its trigger to feel noticeably lighter and smoother than the G27's.

I later checked the trigger pull of the 40c with a digital gauge and observed the new plunger & plunger spring had actually added weight to the trigger, putting the 40c's averaged readings up in the 7 - 7 1/2 lbs range (adding about 1 - 1 1/2 lbs to what it had previously exhibited in averaged readings with the original sear housing block). It just "felt" lighter and smoother than my G27's trigger. My 40 is in stock configuration, BTW. No aftermarket parts to improve the trigger.

So, a heavy trigger isn't necessarily going to be a "bad" trigger.

Trigger technique & control can mitigate the mechanics of the trigger to some extent. That's what of the things useful about frequent proper practice. ;)

I generally look to "improving" the shooter in most instances where trigger pull complaints arise. I'm not working with competition guns, though, just duty/off-duty/CCW weapons.
 

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On my Gen4 G35, I've tried the polishing job plus the following connectors and got little improvement: 3.5 ghost, "minus", "dot", and LWD 3.5.

Adding a Gen 3 trigger bar, didn't help much either, but interestingly the SECOND gen 3 trigger bar I tried got the trigger just to the point of useable. Both were polished identically.

But this 35/4 is still nowhere near as nice as either of my Gen 3 guns with only connector swaps. The trigger is just rough and hard. I have a Vanek classic trigger kit en route. I am hoping it will keep this G35 off of the auction block.
 

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Another reason the Gen4 trigger pull is heavier is the bump on the firing pin safety camming arm of the trigger bar. Some people have ground that bump down, but I wouldn't recommend modifying any existing part in your gun.
The bump rides on the slide. I polished the bump and it feels better.
I wouldn't grind it because it was put there for a purpose, to control how the ramp engages the safety. Without the bump it slides to the side.
 

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With the bump, it wants to move laterally but can't. This causes binding which contributes to the poorer trigger pulls of the gen 4 series.

Gen 3 trigger bars work perfectly well in gen 4 guns. The bump is a solution without a problem. You can see the engagement of the trigger bar with the striker safety by removing the magazine (and rounds!) and looking up through the magazine well. One of my Gen 3 guns has less margin of error than my Gen 4 gun with a Gen 3 trigger bar. But in all cases, there is plenty of engagement.

The Gen 3 trigger bar rides on the right side of the striker safety the same in both Gen 3 and 4 guns.
 
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