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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

I'm new to this forum, and the happy owner of a 4th gen Glock 17. I've messed around with another brand of pistol before, and couldn't hit the broad side of a barn. Now after several years, I picked up a glock, since I wanted something that travels easier than my shotgun does. :)
I immediately discovered that it shoots much nicer than my buddy's Sigma (If I had only known!) I have a much easier time hitting what I'm aiming at, and quite a bit of fun.

I know this question has probably been asked and beat to death, but after extensive reading, I haven't found this broached in a manner that explains it well enough for me to grasp.

I only have about 300 rounds in the Glock so far (I've had it under a month) and have noticed that the more I learn on it, the further from the bullseye I am getting, though my groupings are getting more consistent. I feel that the biggest issue here is the trigger control, but wanted to ask the group.

Before I frame the specific question, I'd like to mention that my rear sight (factory) only has one notch on the side. I've read that there are multiple rear factory sights with notches to let you adjust for distance. I've been aiming using the "focus on the front sight - top of sights aligned to center of bullseye" method. Since I am shooting consistently low, but reasonably well grouped, is this a possible reason? I don't cover the point of aim with the dot, as some suggest (I'm assuming since I'm a noob, it's my fault, not the sights)

I've read everywhere that proper trigger control can be learned by dry firing. The philosphy being that if the sights jerk in dry fire practice, you botched the shot. I have practiced dry fire to the point to where the pistol is stable when I pull the trigger, every time. I'm not scared of the pistol when I shoot it So, my specific questions on the subject are these:

Can anyone describe the feeling and/or motion of a good trigger squeeze? "Being surprised by the shot" isn't really cutting it for me. some folks say to take up the slack first, which sounds like it's the opposite of "being surprised by the shot" I'd like to hear something a little more detailed about the sensation.

How long had you been shooting (in rounds shot or in time) before you felt comfortable knowing you had it down?
 

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Even after taking out the trigger slack, you can still be suprised by the break. Now this has worked for my wife and a few others. I heard my academy range master telling some other folks so I tried it on my wife..Trust me when I say spouses are the hardest to teach or coach..Anyway lets try it..

When you're at the firing line, Good sight picture and sight alignment, take up the slack and stop.

Now say in one long word while applying pressure to the trigger.

squeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeze untill the trigger breaks.

Hell I dont know if it will work for you but it has worked for others..Anyway give it a try and see what happens.
 

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You learn to shoot a Glock the same way you would get into Carnegie Hall.

Practice, Practice, Practice ! :wavey:
 

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TEXAS COWBOY
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You learn to shoot a Glock the same way you would get into Carnegie Hall.

Practice, Practice, Practice ! :wavey:
I couldn't agree more...Thats my story and I'm stickin' to it!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I agree 100% on the "teaching the spouse". I tried giving her some remedial lessons on motorcycle riding once... Good thing it wasn't a pistol :)

I'll keep up the practice.
 

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It takes more than just practice, it takes an outside trainer. If you already have a bad habbit then you are just practicing perfecting your bad habbit.

An outside instructor can see these bad habbits and correct them. As a wise man once said " Practice with a purpose" Perfect practice produces perfection.

Continue shooting with bad habbits and you're just wasting ammo.
 

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Transform & Win
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Hello Earthmapper, welcome to Glock Talk. :wavey:

If you haven't read this already, you will likely find some very useful information in the following Glock Talk thread:

Is there a "right" way to pull the trigger?

I also heartily recommend reading the chapter on Trigger Control from the Army Marksmanship Training Guide that is discussed by GT member Butch and others in the above thread.
 

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Your flinching, milking the grip or slapping the trigger. You need better grip (even grip pressure throughout the shot and with all your fingers) and smooth even compression of the trigger. When holding the pistol be sure your pinky is gripping with the same pressure as the rest of the fingers, and press back on the trigger smoothly.
 

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Man, I'm Pretty
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Dry firing is your friend.

When you dry fire pay attention. Mindless dry firing is as useless as mindless range shooting.

Do not let your sight alignment suffer.

Do not let your sight picture suffer.

Everything should remain relatively steady as the trigger breaks.

Follow through.

If the sights move when the trigger breaks you have a problem that needs to be fixed.

It might be any number of things but a quick search of the internet should get you a few suggestions.

When you go to the range have a plan. Work on specific problems or techniques. You don't have to shoot 500 rounds a week to be an excellent shot, but you do have to have a plan and the ability to stick to it.

Even the very best shots occasionally have bad things creep into their technique. When that happens they SLOW DOWN and concentrate on the basics of trigger control until they have restored proper technique.

Regards,
Happyguy :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the advice, everyone. I'll see what I can remember next time I'm at the range. I got a gripmaster for grip strength. I do it for 15 minutes here and there, but it's already made a difference in my ring and pinky strength. I figure if I can't correct it with the advice after a few more goes, I'd get a 3rd party involved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I took the NRA basic pistol course (a necessity for CCW). I didn't get to use my glock for the marksmanship component of the course, but everything they told me backed what you've been saying (obviously, right?) :)

I was habitually only grabbing with my index and middle finger and not applying the bottom until the squeeze (something I noticed after thinking about it during dry-fire this past week) It wasn't really making a difference during dry-fire but it was when I was shooting live. Also, I was going a bit overboard with the finger on the pad. they advised a bit more finger and I was right up and in the bullseye almost every time. (I had 2 strays that were 1/2 inch out).
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I just got back from the range. I had the first feeling of the "surprise break" today, where my awareness was so focused on maintaining sight picture and an even squeeze on the trigger that when the shot broke, it was a true surprise. It was only a few times out of the hundred shots I took, but it was there, and they were decent shots. I've decided that my trigger control has improved, but my bigger problem is involuntary flinch.

I purchased some dummy rounds and put two in each magazine. I didn't ask anyone to load for me, but distracted myself while loading the magazine, and that went a long way toward helping with the surprise. It very clearly showed that, while mentally I'm relaxed and having fun, my reflexes are still jittery. After the third magazine, the flinch was still noticable, but significantly reduced. The flinching was clearly pulling into a bottom left direction, btw. I would say it's nearly impossible to correct until you see with your own eyes using dummy rounds in live fire.

The difference is that now I'm shooting 2" groups at 15' (I'm still a noob) centered on the bottom center of bullseye on a 9" target, with the 2" being the occasional stray, and centered bottom quarter of outside on a 6 inch target. i'm finally confident with the idea of increasing distance.

My plan is to always be consistent on dry fire each day, and iron out the flinch with live fire mixed with dummy rounds.
 

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RetiredDinosaur
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I just got back from the range. I had the first feeling of the "surprise break" today, where my awareness was so focused on maintaining sight picture and an even squeeze on the trigger that when the shot broke, it was a true surprise. It was only a few times out of the hundred shots I took, but it was there, and they were decent shots. I've decided that my trigger control has improved, but my bigger problem is involuntary flinch.

I purchased some dummy rounds and put two in each magazine. I didn't ask anyone to load for me, but distracted myself while loading the magazine, and that went a long way toward helping with the surprise. It very clearly showed that, while mentally I'm relaxed and having fun, my reflexes are still jittery. After the third magazine, the flinch was still noticable, but significantly reduced. The flinching was clearly pulling into a bottom left direction, btw. I would say it's nearly impossible to correct until you see with your own eyes using dummy rounds in live fire.

The difference is that now I'm shooting 2" groups at 15' (I'm still a noob) centered on the bottom center of bullseye on a 9" target, with the 2" being the occasional stray, and centered bottom quarter of outside on a 6 inch target. i'm finally confident with the idea of increasing distance.

My plan is to always be consistent on dry fire each day, and iron out the flinch with live fire mixed with dummy rounds.
Most excellent!!!

Well done.....stay after it!
:thumbsup:
 

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Yep, get some snap caps and load them randomly into some mags and hit the range.

As far as trigger control, use the pad of your index finger and PULL (dont squeeze) the trigger straight back toward you as if the gun wouldnt work any other way. All the motion is done with your index finger and no other muscles in your hands or arms are moving. If you feel you are using your left hand to keep the sights on target then you are doing it wrong, left off the trigger and try again. Dont worry if you arent surprised when it goes off, I never am, not exactly a hair trigger we are dealing with.

Good support from a good grip and stance is also very important and can improve some of the flaws with poor trigger control. Its best to get them all right obviously.
 

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We are all trying to tell you the same thing, but each person's terminology is a little different, and that can be confusing.

You truly need to have a competent competition shooter evaluate your grip.

Take up the trigger slack, and then smoothly press the trigger to the rear of the trigger guard while holding the best sight picture you can. I say press on purpose: Others say pull or squeeze, but you really are not doing either.

A lot of shooters endorse the idea of having the 'bullseye' sitting on top of your sights. If you aim at the center of the bullseye, you really have no reference to tell you are truly aiming at the center. (You will have to be very good before it really matters)

I shot many thousands of rounds before I felt I 'had it down'. I am a Hunter Ed and NRA Pistol instructor, so I see the results of poor control on a regular basis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the encouragement everyone. I definitely don't have it down yet, but I am starting to feel like things moved in a positive direction!
 

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Welcome. Keep it up.
 
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