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Trigger control problems on stock glock pistols...

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by Laramie In MT, Mar 4, 2010.

  1. Laramie In MT

    Laramie In MT

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    I have been regularly shooting handguns now for about 7 years. Up until about a year ago, my shooting has revolved around target practice and practicing with my carry guns. I was confident that I could put bullets where they needed to go.

    Now, I'm pretty involved in USPSA/IDPA and multi-gun. These matches have really helped to exposure the flaws in my shooting technique.

    Seems that I am having problems with trigger pull. I feel like I have a strong grip, good stance etc, but after shooting a modded glock the other day, I came to a conclusion.

    A buddy had a CCF frame lower with a G34 slide/barrel. He also did a 3.5lb trigger, polished a few things, shorter trigger reset, etc.

    So at the plate rake with the CCF34, I was able to nail every plate, first shot. It was almost too easy.

    Then I would switch back to my stock G22 and unless I was using complete concentration to not yank or slap the trigger, I was missing a few plates on the first shot.

    My thought is that with the stock G22, the trigger pull is more than the modified 3.5lb, there's more resistance, and on that more resistance, I'm jerking the trigger and this is affecting my point of aim, thus causing me to miss shots.

    I know most will suggest dry fire practice, but I'm not sure the best way to go about it, what targets, distance, etc.

    Any help greatly appreciated. :wavey:
     
  2. ronin.45

    ronin.45

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    The lower pull weight on the CCF34 definitely makes it easier to shoot. I would also check which backstrap he had installed. He could have the flat backstrap on it which may fit you better.


    Dry firing is the best way to improve your trigger pull without the distraction of recoil and noise. You can do it any where. It doesn't require a target or any distance at all. The key is to make sure there is no ammo around so you are completely safe. Just line up the sights on a doorknob or something and concentrate on pulling the trigger smoothly back without disturbing the sights. If you do this enough you will notice a big difference next time you go to the range. You can also practice releasing the trigger just enough for it to reset instead of taking your finger off the trigger completely after each shot.

    Good luck.
     

  3. Butch

    Butch RetiredDinosaur CLM Millennium Member

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    Are you using the reset?
     
  4. HK Dan

    HK Dan

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    As your shooting career progresses you'll become less and less dependant on a light trigger pull, provided that you work on becoming less dependant. Some folks think that going out and shooting 1000 rounds makes them a better shooter; it doesn't. Unless you think about what you did and change it up, you're just getting 1 round of experience 1000 times.

    So, yes, dry fire will help, butonly if you think about it, change it up, use new techniques, andfind what works. Your goal should be to break the shot without moving the sights, period.

    Do that in isolation. Don't add in a draw, a reload, and 3 target transitions--just work on the trigger. Certainly you should do those things in dryfire, but work the skill in isolation for the majority of the session. Top it off with a lil "mini stage" if you like. The same session will work at the range when you go live.

    Finally, the reason why you hear so much heed given to dry fire practice is simple; it works. You can do 10 times as much work as you can at the range. So, yeah, we're predictable...<g>

    Dan
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2010
  5. fuzzy03cls

    fuzzy03cls

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    Maybe I'm a freak...Dry firing does nothing for me. I need the gun to go bang to get the feel. I need the noise, I need the full experience. I've tried dry firing on different guns & it just doesn't work for me.
    So with that for me live firing many rounds is what helps me with trigger control.
     
  6. Butch

    Butch RetiredDinosaur CLM Millennium Member

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    Problem is that the recoil and 'bang' keep you from seeing if you are pulling the trigger without moving the sights or not.


    What part 'doesn't work'? Or does that just mean you find it boring (like most training drills)?


    Live fire is good and certainly needed, but dry fire helps perfect your trigger control, and done right, it helps to learn to use the reset. If any shots are going more than a few inches low and/or left of your point of aim, dummy rounds should come into use during training for 'ball and dummy' drills.
     
  7. hikerpaddler

    hikerpaddler

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    Dry firing does work. If it doesn't, you're either very advanced and hitting everything anyway, or you're not doing it right. Shooting at a high level with a stock glock takes practice.
     
  8. mdehoogh

    mdehoogh

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    How can I learn to use the reset without a recoiling slide to push the trigger forward? Currently, I'll dry fire and then rack the slide a half inch or so to reset the trigger and dry fire again. Should I just hold the trigger down, rack the slide then slowly release to find the reset point or is there another way of doing it?
     
  9. Njanear

    Njanear Nagant-ophile

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    Yep. That's what I do.
     
  10. FillYerHands

    FillYerHands you son of a

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    Learning to shoot Glocks using the trigger reset rather than slapping the trigger was the biggest single breakthrough in my shooting, ever. I owe a debt of gratitude to the AMU sergeant who was RO at the GSSF match, who showed me what I was doing and how to feel the reset.

    Dry firing is boring for me sometimes, but I have learned to embrace boring. Read Mastery by George Leonard.
     
  11. Butch

    Butch RetiredDinosaur CLM Millennium Member

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    Exactly, but get 'back on target' prior to letting the trigger move forward to the reset point.
     
  12. ipscshooter

    ipscshooter Mostly IDPA now

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    A few thoughts.

    The lighter trigger helps. Also the longer sight radius.

    The 34 is a 9mm and 22 is 40. CCF gun is likely heavier.

    I have a 22 and a 34. While they both have 3.5 lb connectors and $0.25 trigger job, the trigger on the 34 is slightly better. I can shoot the 34 better than the 22. By better I mean faster and/or more accurately. I attribute it to the trigger, longer sight radius, and the little bit of added weight out front.

    Also, consider that in your mind you know the 40 will recoil more than the 9. You could be subconsiously aniticipating the increased recoil and flinching just a bit. Sometimes if I am switching guns around I catch myself doing it, even though I have shot 10's of thousands of rounds of 40 and 45, and 44 mag doesn't bother me. My guess is if you just shot the 40 you would do better with it. It could be the switching is playing with your subconcious. I'm pretty sure it happens to me.

    Forgive my rambling. Hope you sort it out.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2010
  13. Palmguy

    Palmguy Boom.

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    Dry fire practice is invaluable.
     
  14. dragonmalice

    dragonmalice

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    I've found using a laser during dry fire practice is also useful. I have about 25 feet to work with in my basement - even at that range, the laser clearly shows movement when the front sight seems to be stable. You also see exactly where the shot would have gone.

    On the flip side, it could lead to watching the target rather than the sights during live fire if you over do it.
     
  15. Ryobi

    Ryobi SummertimeRules

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    Correct hp. The failure cycle is to 1. shoot poorly 2. try every gimmick you can to help you shoot better (finger on front of guard, polishing, rubber grips, etc.) 3. still not shoot well 4. conclude without any clue whatsoever that your gun just "isn't very accurate".

    To win, realize that the glock is very accurate, and very easy to shoot well for skilled individuals. Dry fire is a good way to start building your skills towards being a good shooter. Mods are fine for a range gun, but they aren't necessary to shoot a glock great, be it paper punching or combat shooting.