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Tree damaged in blizzard. Will homeowners insurance cover it?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by NickC50310, Dec 23, 2012.

  1. NickC50310

    NickC50310

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    So i have a large tree in my backyard that was severely damaged in last weeks blizzard. No property damage has occurred yet but it will if the tree is not taken down in the correct manner. Since this is storm damage wouldnt my homeowners insurance cover the clean up? The estimate i have so far says 2k to bring it down.

    posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire
     
  2. gjk5

    gjk5 Pinche Gringo

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    clean up: yes, very likely so.
     

  3. Resqu2

    Resqu2

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    After a twister hit my sister-n-laws house and took out/damaged a bunch of trees her insurance payed to have them all cleaned up and removed. Can't see why you wouldn't be covered to?
     
  4. meathead19

    meathead19

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    Negative.

    Sucks, I know. Call your agent for verification.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2012
  5. JDennis

    JDennis

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    I am thinking not. Without property damage it will not be covered.
     
  6. NickC50310

    NickC50310

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  7. sjfrellc

    sjfrellc CLM

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    Hazard insurance won't pay if damage was not done to you home or valuables.



    http://blog.insure.com/2011/03/14/help-a-tree-fell-on-my-house/



    Help, a tree fell on my house!
    by Barbara Marquand under HOME INSURANCE
    Falling trees are among the common hazards you could face as a homeowner during snow and ice storms, but the ins and outs of insurance coverage depend on the situation.

    Generally, standard home insurance doesn’t pay for damage to trees, shrubs and other plants from a storm, according to the Property Casualty Insurers Association of America (PCI). But it does cover damage a falling tree causes to structures that are covered under the insurance policy.

    Here’s how coverage would work under the following scenarios:

    A tree in your neighbor’s yard fell over and broke a window in your house. File a claim under your home insurance policy. It should cover the damage and the cost to remove the tree.
    A tree in your own yard fell on your detached garage and damaged the roof. Standard home insurance covers detached structures. The damage and removal of the tree would be covered under your policy.
    A tree on your property fell on your neighbor’s house and caused damage. Your neighbor should file a claim under his or her insurance policy.
    A large branch fell on your roof but caused no damage. Generally, home insurance would not provide coverage for the tree or the cost to remove it.
    Your car was damaged when a tree fell onto your driveway. Comprehensive car insurance would provide coverage. Unlike liability insurance, which pays for damage you do to others when you cause a car accident, comprehensive coverage is optional. It pays for damage to your own vehicle from causes other than car accidents, such as vandalism, natural disasters, collisions with animals and theft.
    PCI says if your home sustained damage from a falling tree, report it to your insurance agent as soon as possible to settle the claim quickly and accurately. Always keeping safety in mind, do what you can to protect your property from further damage or theft by making emergency repairs to cover openings, and keep receipts for anything you buy. Submit those to your insurance company when you make the claim. In addition, take photos of the damaged property as part of a complete inventory, and don’t throw anything away before checking with your insurance company, PCI advises.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2012
  8. meathead19

    meathead19

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    You said NO property damage in your first post.

    If you want, call obongo for some of his stash....he's got some left I'm sure.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2012
  9. NickC50310

    NickC50310

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    Lmao! One of my democrat friends suggested the same thing in jest. Ill call the insurance company and see what they say.

    posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire
     
  10. NickC50310

    NickC50310

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  11. meathead19

    meathead19

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    the joys of home ownership. :wavey:
     
  12. JDennis

    JDennis

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    Just throw something under the tree like a dog house and get the branch to fall the rest of the way damaging the dog house.:supergrin: But I was never the one that suggested it haha
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2012
  13. jay-bird

    jay-bird goin' broke

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    Take photos and video. Prove it was storm damage. Call your agent. Can't hurt to ask - or at least go over your options.
     
  14. meathead19

    meathead19

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    Keep us posted. I'd like to know what they say.
     
  15. Hines57

    Hines57 Simple Member

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    No, has to damage a covered structure. House, garage, fence, pool etc.
     
  16. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    That's pretty much my understanding.
     
  17. NIB

    NIB

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    You would think that an insurance company would pay less to remove a tree that could cause a larger sum of monetary damage in the future. That is not always the case.
     
  18. Officer X

    Officer X

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    Hope you don't have State Farm

    During Sandy, a co worker had a very large tree get partially uprooted in his yard and it was hanging over his house. It looked like it could come down at any time and the angle potentially put his neighbor's house in jeopardy too. Tree company gave him an estimate in the $3,000 range to remove the tree, as I said, very large, hanging dangerously over the house.

    State Farm informed him they would not pay for it as there was no property damage. If the tree were to fall and cause damage to the house, they would send an agent out but until then he was responsible for it.

    He is looking for another insurance company now.
     
  19. Hines57

    Hines57 Simple Member

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    Why should an insurance company pay for it? It didn't damage anything. Are they responsible for fixing things that may damage the home?
    State Farm should have told your neighbor now that he sees that he has a problem, he better get it fixed. If he doesn't they will probably deny any damage that he may have from the tree falling.
     
  20. Rotn1

    Rotn1

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    We just went through the same thing here north of Philly from "Sandy". The State Farm adjuster explained that if the tree had damaged the house or a structure you would be covered. Tree's damaged on their own with no colateral damage..... he said no.

    There may be a grey area as to where taking down the tree WILL prevent future damage to the house.
    You will argue it will be saving them money. They will argue it is your job to mitigate and avoid future damage.
    Good luck.