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For those of you following my journey, I chose a NRA instructor who focused on point/intuitional self defense. The first class focused on what you would expect: safety, laws, situational awareness, laws, legal use of self defense, conflict avoidance, and other responsibilities of a gun owner.

The second class focus was on all the proper mechanics of shooting, stance site picture, grip and other thing people here know. One interesting aspect was the homework. The instructor called it "Super Slow" draw and presentation of the handgun and squeezing the trigger. I got some snap caps for that. And it was literally that. Make all movements as slow as possible and be aware of what you learned and your mussels. Do it until you are not thinking about it but in the moment. I thought this was very Zen of the instructor.

More to come.
 

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For those of you following my journey, I chose a NRA instructor who focused on point/intuitional self defense. The first class focused on what you would expect: safety, laws, situational awareness, laws, legal use of self defense, conflict avoidance, and other responsibilities of a gun owner.

The second class focus was on all the proper mechanics of shooting, stance site picture, grip and other thing people here know. One interesting aspect was the homework. The instructor called it "Super Slow" draw and presentation of the handgun and squeezing the trigger. I got some snap caps for that. And it was literally that. Make all movements as slow as possible and be aware of what you learned and your mussels. Do it until you are not thinking about it but in the moment. I thought this was very Zen of the instructor.

More to come.
Thanks for the update, sounds like your well on your way. Keep us informed of your progress.
 

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10mm Philosopher
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* * * Make all movements as slow as possible and be aware of what you learned and your mussels. Do it until you are not thinking about it but in the moment. I thought this was very Zen of the instructor.
Maybe it was, but we assume the above was a Freudian slip ... unless your instructor was actually serving up a shell fish known to impart erogenous tendencies, post-consumption.

;)

:LOL:

:ROFLMAO:
 

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For those of you following my journey, I chose a NRA instructor who focused on point/intuitional self defense. The first class focused on what you would expect: safety, laws, situational awareness, laws, legal use of self defense, conflict avoidance, and other responsibilities of a gun owner.

The second class focus was on all the proper mechanics of shooting, stance site picture, grip and other thing people here know. One interesting aspect was the homework. The instructor called it "Super Slow" draw and presentation of the handgun and squeezing the trigger. I got some snap caps for that. And it was literally that. Make all movements as slow as possible and be aware of what you learned and your mussels. Do it until you are not thinking about it but in the moment. I thought this was very Zen of the instructor.

More to come.
You’re wasting no time advancing. That’s excellent and wise. After awhile, when you feel ready, I’d suggest taking Tactical Response’s Fighting Pistol course. Two full days of training, 1000 rounds. The class is for novice through advanced shooters.

The company is run by James Yeager. Lots of folks dislike him, and you’ll begin seeing those opinions here in a few seconds. But I’ve taken the course twice. First time Yeager was out of town so his instructors taught it. Outstanding. Second time, a few years later, Yeager was present. He’s a force to be reckoned with, but the course was still excellent. It absolutely poured rain both days; we shot anyway. Yeah, outdoors.

I take a tactical pistol course once per year now; nothing has equaled Fighting Pistol.
 

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You’re wasting no time advancing. That’s excellent and wise. After awhile, when you feel ready, I’d suggest taking Tactical Response’s Fighting Pistol course. Two full days of training, 1000 rounds. The class is for novice through advanced shooters.

The company is run by James Yeager. Lots of folks dislike him, and you’ll begin seeing those opinions here in a few seconds. But I’ve taken the course twice. First time Yeager was out of town so his instructors taught it. Outstanding. Second time, a few years later, Yeager was present. He’s a force to be reckoned with, but the course was still excellent. It absolutely poured rain both days; we shot anyway. Yeah, outdoors.

I take a tactical pistol course once per year now; nothing has equaled Fighting Pistol.
Miss Jones,
Do yourself a favor and refrain
from attending any classes ran by James Yeager.
 

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Miss Jones,
Do yourself a favor and refrain
from attending any classes ran by James Yeager.
Your opinion, @Benton. Many shooters do not share your sentiments.

Told you the negativity would pour in. Miss Jones, do YOUR OWN research, then make your decision. You’re clearly capable.
 

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For those of you following my journey, I chose a NRA instructor who focused on point/intuitional self defense. The first class focused on what you would expect: safety, laws, situational awareness, laws, legal use of self defense, conflict avoidance, and other responsibilities of a gun owner.

The second class focus was on all the proper mechanics of shooting, stance site picture, grip and other thing people here know. One interesting aspect was the homework. The instructor called it "Super Slow" draw and presentation of the handgun and squeezing the trigger. I got some snap caps for that. And it was literally that. Make all movements as slow as possible and be aware of what you learned and your mussels. Do it until you are not thinking about it but in the moment. I thought this was very Zen of the instructor.

More to come.
Sounds like a great start though I don’t know why the instructor even introduced you to drawing at this early stage of your basic marksmanship training.
 

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Sounds like a great start though I don’t know why the instructor even introduced you to drawing at this early stage of your basic marksmanship training.
Correct presentation is a foundation that’s best taught early in conjunction with marksmanship basics. Proper grip on the pistol is a marksmanship fundamental and you obtain it while the weapon is still holstered. Proper presentation is also important to much of that which follows, isometrics, sight picture, posture, etc. The sooner you teach it the less likely a student has to unlearn a bad habit. In my experience most students can learn presentation and fundamentals of marksmanship concurrently without overload. Just one man’s opinion.
 

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I must have missed your choice of handguns from the other thread. What did you end up with, if I may ask?
 

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Training is good. I kind of jumped in at the deep end but later got some remedial work.

John Shaw's MISS was good but he is now only training AGEs (Armed Government Employees, military and police.)

Dave Elderton did a traveling class but I think he is only operating at his home range now.

The local PD did a series of classes for a while. The first was about what you get in those mandatory CCW training jurisdictions, but levels 2 and 3 stepped it up a good deal. It was a great community service, I don't know why they stopped.

I didn't get a class with Randy Cain of Cumberland Tactics, but he has a great reputation.
And there are a lot of others across the country.

Re James Yeager; I have not had a class from him but some years ago he was holding action matches of his own style. I thought him kind of full of himself but you could probably learn a lot.
Not to include sitting between targets photographing shooters from the business end.
 

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For those of you following my journey, I chose a NRA instructor who focused on point/intuitional self defense. The first class focused on what you would expect: safety, laws, situational awareness, laws, legal use of self defense, conflict avoidance, and other responsibilities of a gun owner.

The second class focus was on all the proper mechanics of shooting, stance site picture, grip and other thing people here know. One interesting aspect was the homework. The instructor called it "Super Slow" draw and presentation of the handgun and squeezing the trigger. I got some snap caps for that. And it was literally that. Make all movements as slow as possible and be aware of what you learned and your mussels. Do it until you are not thinking about it but in the moment. I thought this was very Zen of the instructor.

More to come.
Remember: slow is smooth, smooth is fast…

translation: focus on getting the fundamentals right, then build speed doing it right.
 
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