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Training Static/Moving & Carry Condition

1076 Views 3 Replies 2 Participants Last post by  Mas Ayoob
Mas, I have a few questions if you don't mind answering?

1. Have you found any drills more efficient than the El Presidente for self-defense purposes? Can you recommend any in particular to focus on?

2. When shooting on the move (again drill related) should you shuffle to the side, two hands on pistol while not crossing feet, remaining square to target.. Or walk/sprint to the side in a walking motion and turret your body? Do you risk the slimmer profile by providing a possible broad side shot? Or does it depend on whether or not you are wearing body armor?

3. Do you personally recommend against condition 3 carry with a Glock? I'm curious about your experiences as I've read comments from both sides I'd like to hear your take.

Thank you
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· KoolAidAntidote
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Answering in order:

1. There are lots of useful drills. Consider the 90-shot IDPA Classifier, drawn somewhat from Ken Hackathorn's excellent Hackathorn Standards. Also the FAST Drill, Dot Torture, and others you'll find at pistol-training.com, Todd Louis Green's outstanding site.

2. Depends where you have to go and how fast you have to get there. Avoid crab-walking and cross-stepping. Running toward your strong hand side, flowing from Isosceles into Weaver from the waist up gives you a good, wide range of movement with two-handed control; running toward your non-dominant hand side, you'll generally do better breaking free to one-hand shooting. If you have body armor, you want to keep the panels toward the identified threat as much as possible.

3. I don't recommend carrying anything you can't draw and fire instantly with one hand. None of us should be carrying guns that aren't drop-safe with a round in the chamber, since guns like any other tools can get dropped during strenuous activity. If the discomfort comes from a striker-fired pistol with short trigger stroke and no manual safety, consider NY-1 module and Cominolli retrofit thumb safety for the Glock, or go to a double action auto or revolver.

YMMV,
Mas
 

· Registered
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1. Thank you, I spent most of last year focusing on marksmanship including 25 yard shooting, Dot Torture, etc. I am looking into adding the speed element now.

2. Great explanation, I saw this run on pistol-forum and wanted to confirm the method.

3. Agreed, I haven't modified my trigger and carry condition 1 appendix. Would you recommend the NY trigger, does it make it THAT much safer? I am careful to insert slowly, point away from my body and use a custom Kydex holster. I've considered an external safety as well, but I am left handed so I feel that option is out with a Glock. If I decided I feel more secure having a safety I would probably go M&P9c or M&P9.
 

· KoolAidAntidote
Joined
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6,118 Posts
1. Thank you, I spent most of last year focusing on marksmanship including 25 yard shooting, Dot Torture, etc. I am looking into adding the speed element now.

2. Great explanation, I saw this run on pistol-forum and wanted to confirm the method.

3. Agreed, I haven't modified my trigger and carry condition 1 appendix. Would you recommend the NY trigger, does it make it THAT much safer? I am careful to insert slowly, point away from my body and use a custom Kydex holster. I've considered an external safety as well, but I am left handed so I feel that option is out with a Glock. If I decided I feel more secure having a safety I would probably go M&P9c or M&P9.
Giving a firm resistance to the trigger finger from the beginning of the pull, the NY-1 is intended to add an additional layer of safety in matters such as holstering, particularly when the shooter is under stress or distracted. Can't hurt.
best,
Mas
 
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