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Top 10 passwords

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by Blitzer, Jun 25, 2006.

  1. Blitzer

    Blitzer Cool Cat

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    The Top 10 Most Popular Passwords

    Nearly 8 in every 1,000 people use either "password" or "123" as their password, according to a survey by the British Web site Modern Life Is Rubbish: News & Views of the Modern Interweb.

    Why is this important? Read the list below. If you use one of these passwords, change it immediately. It's far too easy for a computer criminal to breach security and invade your personal e-mail or other domain. A strong password is your first defense when it comes to protecting your private data.

    Top 10 passwords:

    1. 123
    Would you protect your bank account with a PIN number this simple and easy to replicate? Come on, be more creative. At least add a word before or after it.

    2. password
    You may think you're clever choosing such an easy to remember password, but the problem is that almost 1 in 250 people do the same thing!

    3. liverpool
    This list is based on a British poll, but the lesson is the same. In this case, "liverpool" could be the name of the city or soccer team. Either way, don't use your hometown or favorite sports team as a password.

    4. letmein
    Let me in! Let me in! It's the modern-day equivalent of "Open Sesame!"

    5. 123456
    It's always wise to use one or more numbers in your password, but choose an order that's not quite so predictable!

    6. qwerty
    Cute! But don't use it. It may be that when you have to type something in that blank space for the password, you look down at the keyboard hoping for inspiration and see the first six letters on the top row. The problem is too many other people do the same thing.

    7. charlie
    Choosing the name of a loved one is commonly done and easily guessed by anyone who knows you. Honor your loved ones in some other way!

    8. monkey
    It's a mystery as to why "monkey" is such a popular password, but it could be that it contains six letters (typically, this is the minimum number required), is easy to remember and is easy to type.

    9. arsenal
    This is the name of a popular soccer team in England, which probably accounts for its presence on this British list. But the lesson still holds in the United States: Don't choose Giants, Cowboys or Ravens either! Sports teams are ubiquitous passwords. "Arsenal" may also be popular because its first four letters are a four-letter word.

    10. thomas
    Yet another first name! Choosing a password is not like naming a child.

    What is the ideal password? It should be easy for you to remember, but hard for others to guess. Choose a password that is at least six to eight characters long and includes a combination of letters and numbers, such as: 12hat93rxh. Do not use your birthday, name, screen name or other obvious words or dates that someone else could guess. If you've ever told anyone your password or you've had the same password for more than a few months, it's a good idea to change it. A new password gives more security.

    One more tip: Make sure you keep your password written down in a secure place so you won't forget it!


    http://channels.netscape.com/tech/p...a-h-02&name=fte/top10passwords/top10passwords

    :shocked: :freak:
     
  2. ChuteTheMall

    ChuteTheMall Wallbuilder and Weapon Bearer

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  3. Davegrave

    Davegrave Dapper Dan

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    I'm password obsessive. No one will ever guess them, but they're all easy to type and for me to remember.


    I like to try to choose passwords or names that I can type with only 1 hand, because then it looks cool if someone watches you log in.

    :)
     
  4. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    Actually, many studies have shown that machine-generated or meaningless passwords are far from ideal. Many users not being able to remember them write them down on a sticky and post them under the keyboard, monitor, etc.

    Of the non-bio schemes (retina scan, etc), probably the most optimal (or close to it) are the ones generated using token cards or a combination of token card+password selected by the user.
     
  5. Sgt. Schultz

    Sgt. Schultz Annoying Member

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    If you speak a foreign language you could use some obscure phrase or slang comment and always include random upper and lower case characters and spaces. I found that these are harder to hack and easier for the user to remember.
     
  6. nickg

    nickg

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    i just use my American Express or VISA number as a password. no one would EVER decipher that for illegal purposes!!

    :upeyes: :supergrin: :supergrin:
     
  7. grenadier

    grenadier

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    Other common passwords:

    1) asdf or some other variant, such as asdfjkl;, asdf1234, or something otherwise equally silly.

    2) Using your username as the password as well.

    3) Using your real name as the password...


    Now, I can understand if someone might have difficulty remembering the passwords, so use this generator:

    http://www.winguides.com/security/password.php

    Presto. Easy to remember.
     
  8. MikeG22

    MikeG22 CLM

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    Passphrases are a better way to go. Just as easy to remember but super hard to guess. You could use something like "ilovetosurfglocktalk24x7" Nobody would ever guess that, it won't ever be in a wordlist/dictionary attack, and it's simple to type.
     
  9. malkore

    malkore

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    smart password creation ideas:

    1. minimum of 8 characters
    2. should contain at least one numeric character
    3. should contain at least one upper-case alpha character
    4. if allowed, should contain at least on symbol character


    When I have to generate strong passwords, I look around my office. for example, there's a silver coffee mug here.

    so i start with "silvermug" that's 9 characters.
    SilverMug - now it has a couple of upper case letters
    Si1v3rMug - now we have some numerics

    If I could do a symbol I'd go with
    S!1v3rMug -- that's gonna be a pain to crack with a password generator because it has no real significance, is 9 digits long, and contains a lot of variables.
     
  10. HVAC-TEK

    HVAC-TEK

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    As a security person, I can tell you that nothing really matters. A fifteen year old kid can get on the net and get a password tool that will crack any password.

    The question is how long it will take for the software to breach it. Your goal is to make your password secure enough to take over one day of 'solid hammering' to crack.

    You want at least eight characters.
    No words (password tools focus on words first)
    MiXeD UppEr aNd LOWeR casE
    Alpha numeric, which means add numbers.

    This is known as a 'strong password'

    This is a simple start.

    Consider a pass faze. This is nothing more than a password sentence.

    For example(looks around desk)

    "made in china"

    A strong pass faze of that could be........M@d31nCh1n@

    made in china
    M@d3 1n Ch1n@
    M@d31nCh1n@

    password
    P***w0rd
    p*****word
    (odd the *** are edited in by the glocktalk server. The characters i was attempting to use were '@ for a'and '$
    for S' Maby it thought I was swearing?)

    Besides strong passwords, you can use account lockouts to thwart password cracking programs. This causes your computer to 'lock you out' if you fail to type in your password a 'preset number of times'. Once locked out, a manager must reset you. (Or you could set up a timer. For example, three wrong then lock out. Reset after 45 minutes.)


    Just a few thoughts

    K
     
  11. ateamer

    ateamer NRA4EVR

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    Qwerty1!
     
  12. Aaron Heist

    Aaron Heist

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    Eh.

    There's a reason I keep 90gb of rainbow tables.
     
  13. sharpshooter

    sharpshooter Member Millennium Member

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    That's great! Sorry boss, I've still got another 37 minutes before my computer will allow me to log in. Darn, that's the fifth time I've dont that today. Hey, are you done with the sports section? :)