to reload or not?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by ggwash21, Feb 13, 2010.

  1. ggwash21

    ggwash21 Junior Member

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    I have pondering the idea to reload or not to reload. The reason being ammo around here either comes and goes before i can get it or they want $26 a box for american eagle ammo or cci blazer and thats for 9mm. I would also start reloading .223 and .308 which prices around here have went up.
     
  2. sigpro357

    sigpro357

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    It is about 50 percent cheaper to reload than buy the ammunition from a retail store. Especially if you reload handgun bullets utilizing lead slugs or plated bullets. Save the brass you collect and pick up brass from the range, and you will be set.
     

  3. ron59

    ron59 Bustin Caps

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    Sounds like you answered your question already?

    I can reload a SWEET 9mm round (147gr Montana Gold bullet over 3.6gr Solo-1000) which is 130PF yet still soft shooting.... all for $138 per 1000. It costs something like $220 for 1000 from Walmart. And that's the 100-count WWB box for $20.00. Which as you said, you can never find.

    Getting *in* to the hobby isn't cheap. I went with the Dillon 550B, and by the time I bought that, a good scale, tumbler, media separator, and other items, I was close to $800 easy. But... I can walk out into my garage and walk back in slightly over an hour later with 500 rounds, no sweat.

    But for me, I'm shooting competitively and go through an easy 2000 rounds per month, which I couldn't find (affordably), and now I'm saving $80 per 1000 I shoot.

    If you just casually shoot... you might could just hunker down a few more months as I hear signs that the ammo shortage is loosening up slowly but surely. But if you shoot a lot, I'd heartily recommend it.
     
  4. .45 guy

    .45 guy

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    Cost is just one factor. Startup for reloading can be a lot. Componet's have gone up since I started, (about a year and a half) It will save you money in the long run. One thing I see with people is the lack of info going in. They will get equipment there not happy with, to change it later and so on. Resaerch everything well now. If I may also add a personal note. Loading ammo is a hobby to me. I think it commands respect and comitment to learn. I'm still learning about load development and ballistics in general. It's a great hobby and a great way to save if you shoot enough. Good luck and don't hestitate to ask here. I'll let others recomend some reading material for you.
     
  5. ggwash21

    ggwash21 Junior Member

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    thanks a bunch I remember when 9mm was $6.99 a box...... if anyone has a time machine ill go back and buy a bunch for us all.... Anyways whats a good starter press? I was looking at a RCBS starters kit which had everything to start.
     
  6. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel

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    How much 9mm do you want to shoot a month/year. Also look at my sticky at the top of this section of the forum.
     
  7. dudel

    dudel

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    Get "ABC of Reloading" to get informed on the subject and the process. I find I don't save money reloading because I shoot twice as much. If you count all the "extras" that seem to accompany any hobby, the cost savings becomes a little cloudier. On the other hand, I have custom ammo pretty much when I need it. To me that's the biggest benefit.

    If you don't have the time, or your nature is such that you tend to be sloppy, and don't like to follow directions, then it may not be the hobby for you. Do you have space? Can you get time to work uninterrupted?

    Read the stickys above. They have lots of information. You can get in for for as little $200-$300. Components will set you back another $100 for your first batch (depending on if you have any brass saved up).

    It's not for everyone; but many find it an enjoyable hobby.
     
  8. jaybirdjtt

    jaybirdjtt

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    If you shoot CF rifle you really can save some $$. 9mm is a push if all you want to do is shoot at targets once a month, but if you want to duplicate some of the higher end SD stuff then, even with a 9mm, you should reload.
    Lee, I believe, sells a hand press for about $30. I've seen it in a post here and also on the www.midwayusa.com website. If nothing else, this is a place to start. Dies also, something to weigh charges, a scale and a measure although for everyday stuff, you can use a dipper if you spot check with your scale. Lee dies come with a dipper that gives you a specific measure of a specific powder. Just load what they recommend with the instruction in the box to start. Double check with the scale but a cheapie will do you fine for now. So, now you're good to go for $100. Range loads you can go with copper plated bullets vis-a-vis lead if you shoot a Glock.
    No need to get too experimental. Just try some basic stuff that works. Brass....start picking up stuff at the range or buy some used. For 9mm and 45 ACP, I am not too picky as I don't push it. CF rifle, I'd start with some new, high quality brass.
    Personally, I think it's a great hobby and justifiable because you will be saving so much $$ unless you really go crazy and then, it's still justifiable because it's a hobby!

    Best part, well........here in CA a law is passed where you'll have to show ID, register, and be limited on ammo purchases. Some cities you cannot even buy ammo on certain days. ***** the government! Load your own!
     
  9. dudley

    dudley

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    Another benefit other than costs, is consistency. If you are sighting in your rifle, you can develop a load, and never have to worry about resighting in your rifle, because you could not find your regular preferred ammunition. When you change from one branded box to another, your groups can be very different. Reloading gives you an opportunity to stock up on componets, and then you can load to your suiting.
     
  10. fredj338

    fredj338

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    You do save money, you do always have ammo when you need it, as long as you keep a good supply of components, you do have practice ammo that rivals match quality. You just have to access how much ammo you need & that dictates your equip. IMO.
    Time is money, higher volumn quickly cost more. Less than 150rds a week can easily be done on a single stage like the RCBS kit, about 60rds/hr. Upto 350rds/wk, I would look at a Lee turret, 120rds+/hr. BEyond that, a progressive is nice to have for 500rds/wk type of volumn. Most reloaders have way more press than they need. If you are shooting 500rds a month, you do not need a $1000 worth of Dillon 650 (but they are nice) or even the Hornady LNL.
    I've been rolling my own for so long it kills me if I have to buy a single box of factory ammo. Fortunately, that is onl SD/HD ammo or the occasional training class that requires factory.
     
  11. professor gun

    professor gun

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    I have three RCBS single stage presses, one that I started with in 1978 and it has never needed maintenance other than a periodic cleaning and replacement of the primer arm three times. My sons and I reload a large number of rounds and with us working together the three single stages work fine. I have been thinking of getting one of the Dillon progressives as I have heard a lot of positives from friends who own one.

    Before you load anything get a reloading manual (or two) and read their directions thoroughly.
     
  12. fredj338

    fredj338

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    FIrst thing I did when I started relaoding was ditch the primer arm. Get a hand priming tool, I like the Hornady, but the Lee is serviceable. Do all your priming off press. Not only faster but gives you more control over the priming operation.
     
  13. vafish

    vafish

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    Anyone who tells you that you save money reloading is lying to you. Just ask them to show you the savings account with the money in it.

    But, You will shoot a lot more for the same amount of money.

    One other thing people don't take into account when they tell you how much money you save reloading is the time you spend to reload. Time is money and if you could be out doing something to make money you would be better off working and paying for your ammo.

    I've been reloading for 27 years. I started reloading when I was 18 because it was the only way I could get handgun ammunition. Being under 21 I couldn't buy handgun ammo, but no one asked my age when I bought reloading components.

    I reload now because I enjoy reloading, because I can take my spare time and make good ammo, and because I can make a lot more ammo for the same amount of money. When I cast my own bullets with scrap lead I can reload .38 special for about 3 1/2 cents per round. Just the cost of primers and powder. That makes shooting my .38's about as cheap as a .22LR. That doesn't take my time into account that I spend casting bullets or sitting at the progressive press, but I enjoy those times.
     
  14. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel

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    It saves money per round. As you go deeper into the hobby you tend to spend more on the hobby. That does not mean you didn't save money per round. Equipment can be ammortirized over the rest of your life almost. Of course you could put the money into a CD and make a little money. Best thing to do if you really want to save money is to find a friend who will let you sit in some corner of his house and do nothing. Occasional rumage through his trash for food.
     
  15. roguedaddy

    roguedaddy

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    Tagged

    I'm in the same boat, trying to decide if I want to start reloading. I get 6 weeks off every summer so I certainly have the time. I have been thinking of starting in stages. I have been saving brass for about a year so I was thinking of buying a tumbler first then buy components, maybe prime some brass then finally go with a press. My biggest concern is the avaliblity of components.
     
  16. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel

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    Every day you wait delays the process and cost you money. Skip the tumbler. ORDER 10K primers and some Powder. Bullets are easy to get.
     
  17. HAMMERHEAD

    HAMMERHEAD

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    I don't know if I've saved money, but I like my ammo much better than factory ammo. I get better accuracy, more power or less recoil depending on what mood I'm in. Reloading 9mm may not be a big money saver, but reloading .38 Super, .38 Special, .45acp and rifle calibers sure is.
    I think the big questions are will you enjoy it and do you have the time to dedicate to it?
     
  18. PBKing

    PBKing

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    Saved Money? Yeah Right...lol
    Load , Test, experiment, practice,Go Outdoors,Go to the Range,Load some more,Go Hunting,Teach the Next Gen,Go to Walmart and laugh at the inventory and prices,Find a new load,test,practice Oh no, got a new caliber......
    What is not to like?
    If you are looking to save $10/k on the cheapest ammo you think you might get, handloading may not be for you. .02
    ETA It was a comfort going thru the recent ammo/component shortages and panic as a spectator.
    .
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2010
  19. GioaJack

    GioaJack Conifer Jack

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    Just as when buying a used car, the 'salesmen' have pointed out all of the upside points of the car, (reloading) but have neglected to point the rust the lies beneath the fresh paint.

    In reality, reloading can turn out to be the most expensive thing you ever do. Sure, it'll start out innocent enough, you'll spend a relatively small amount of money on equipment and to maintain domestic tranquility you'll go overboard asking the wife her opinion of how the loading bench should be constructed, where it should be located and what shade of curtains will best set off the bright red color of your new Hornady LNL.

    At first you'll limit your loading activities to those times when it in no way takes away from 'quality family time' and will smile cheerfully when informed that the loading equipment must be boxed up for three weeks while the mother-in-law comes for a visit.

    It all starts off innocently enough... but eventually the 'sickness' starts to set in. It begins by sneaking out of the bedroom after the oblatory conjugal services are rendered to size and deprime those last 300 .40 cal cases. Before long the marital intimacies are totally ignored in favor of playing with the newest progressive addition that now sits bolted to the bench next to its two counter parts.

    Past visits to Victoria's Secret to browse the latest in adult fashion are now replaced by sojourns to Cabelas in hopes of scoring a brick of primers and a pound of powder. The insurance deductible to fix the leaking roof is determined to be better spent on a RCBS Pro Melt casting furnace and you find yourself buying a new set of tires every month just so you can have them throw in a bucket of wheel weights with the deal.

    When you answer the phone it's a man's voice asking for your wife and you hand her the phone, telling her that it's her yoga instructor again and that you have two thousand .45 cal bullets that need to be sized and lubed. You never even notice that the centuries old baggy cotton yoga workout uniform has apparently been replaced by lacy black bra and panties but you have noticed that Dillon is now selling a newly designed cover for their 1050 machine.

    Eventually you're shopping for a divorce lawyer that finished higher in his law school class than your wife's lawyer but to no avail because ultimately your wife and her yoga instructor will be living happily ever after in your house enjoying half of all your stuff.

    Be careful with your foray into the world of reloading my friend, it can be the most expensive thing you ever do. Is it worth it... you bet your ass it is. :supergrin:


    Jack
     
  20. Randy from Kansas

    Randy from Kansas

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    Funny Funny Funny

    thanks GioaJack